£11 million boost for IT in dental hospitals

An extra £11 million will be allocated to dental hospitals across England to fund new IT systems that will support the training of dental students, the Department of Health has announced.

The funding is part of a joint initiative by the Department of Health, NHS Connecting for Health and the Dental IT programme board.

As well as training future dental care professionals, NHS dental hospitals and associated dental schools research ways to improve oral and dental health and provide specialist clinical services for patients.

Deputy Chief Dental Officer, Tony Jenner said: ‘This extra funding reinforces the Government’s commitment to supporting dental hospitals and expanding the dental workforce.

‘The NHS now has over 4,000 more dentists than it did in 1997 and we have increased the number of undergraduate training places by 25% to ensure we have more dentists in the areas of the country that need them the most.

The £11 million will be divided between each of the 10 trusts that applied for funding.

The trusts will have responsibility for using the money to train dental students in the use of clinical computer programmes that they will use in practice. IT systems may include:
• Core applications under the National Programme for Technology, such as Patient Administration Systems, N3, Choose and Book, Picture Archiving and Communication Systems and access to the NHS Care Record Service
• Clinical dental systems
• Resource management
• Support for the teaching of students

The 10 trusts receiving allocations are:
• South Birmingham PCT
• University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
• Guy’s & St Thomas’s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
• King’s College Hospital NHS Trust
• Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust
• Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust
• Central Manchester and Manchester Children’s University Hospitals NHS Trust
• Barts and The London NHS Trust
• Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
• The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

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Junking the junk food ads^

Fewer children are being exposed to junk food adverts on TV, according to a new report published by the Department of Health.

And spending on child-themed advertising has decreased by 41% since the beginning of 2003.

This fall is most notable in TV advertising that fell sharply in 2007 with a drop of 46 per cent compared to 2003. In particular, there was less child-focussed advertising for confectionery, fast food restaurants, non-alcoholic drinks and cereals.

Child-themed advertising spend fell overall (from £103 million in 2003 to £61 million in 2007) – despite an increase in the annual spend on food and drink ads. However, this varied across all media:
• TV – 46% decrease in 2007 compared to 2003;
• Press – 42% increase (national and women’s magazines) in 2007 compared to 2003
• Radio, internet and cinema – a combined increase of 11% in 2007 compared to 2003.

Of the types of food being promoted there was a fall in 2007 compared to 2003 in those foods high in fat, salt or sugar being advertised:
• Fast food – 71% decrease
• Confectionery – 62% decrease
• Non-alcoholic drinks – 52% decrease
• Cereal – 37% decrease
• Dairy – 4% increase.

The report, Changes In Food And Drink Advertising And Promotion To Children, shows the prevalence of advertising to children by the food and drink industry.

It sets out details of an analysis carried out for the DoH on advertising across all media to children from January 2003 to December 2007. The report will form a baseline against which future child-themed advertising can be measured.

Public Health Minister Dawn Primarolo said: ‘A third of children in the UK are either overweight or obese – so it’s essential that we help our children make healthy choices in what they eat. The food and drink industry has a huge role to play in this.

‘I am pleased that there are now fewer ads on TV that are tempting our children into bad eating habits – but we must keep our eye on other types of media. I hope that the industry will continue to play its part in reducing the exposure that children have to the promotion of food which is high in fat, salt or sugar.’

This report is part of a raft of measures taken across Government to tackle the difficult subject of child obesity. The £372 million backed Government strategy ‘Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives’ published at the beginning of the year, made it plain that children’s diets are proportionally worse than adults. The future of children’s health is of particular concern.

Government schemes such a 5 A Day, Healthy Start, Healthy Schools and the School Fruit and Veg Scheme aim to promote healthy eating and the increased consumption of fruit and vegetable consumption among young children, their parents and carers.

Change4Life, a new national movement launches this autumn before a major publicity campaign starts in January. This movement will help people throughout England to live healthier, more active lives.

The Government has also been working with Ofcom and the Department of Culture, Media and Sport on reviewing the effectiveness of the current restrictions on food and drink advertising to children.

They are currently conducting a review to look at what industry is doing to improve the nature and balance of food promotion.

The Ofcom review is expected to be published by the end of this year.

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Dental professor among UK’s top 100 influential black people^

Salford University’s Dean of Health and Social Care Cynthia Pine joins footballer Rio Ferdinand, Formula 1 driver Lewis Hamilton and author Zadie Smith, on the Powerlist 2008 – Britain’s 100 Most Influential Black People.

Professor Cynthia Pine, the first woman to be appointed dean of a UK dental school since the first one opened in 1859, was recognised for her outstanding achievement as a black role model.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown described the Powerlist as ‘a celebration of the achievements of 100 remarkable people – a testament of what can happen when talent meets opportunity in our country today’.

She has been Executive Dean of Salford University’s Faculty of Health & Social Care since September 2008 and is consultant in Dental Public Health at Salford Primary Care Trust. In 2006 she was appointed CBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours for her services to dentistry.

As well as charity work raising educational attainment in children, Professor Pine also works with the World Health Organization to address inequalities in children’s oral health.

She said: ‘It is an unexpected honour to be included among so many distinguished people. It’s particularly important in these challenging times to realise the strength and breadth of achievement of black people across the country in so many walks of life.’

The Powerlist 2008 comprises 50 male and 50 female talented black leaders.

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YouTube slammed for DIY dentistry videos^

Britain’s teeth have become the latest victims of the credit crunch, with more people resorting to discount treatments, DIY disasters and dubious dental advice.

Many patients are putting their health at risk by getting amateur advice from YouTube rather than a qualified dentist.

That’s according to Dr Prav Solanki, founder of www.cosmeticdentistryguide.co.uk.

‘Our dentists have reported more cases of people turning up with damaged teeth and gums after trying to do their own teeth whitening,,’ says Dr Solanki.

‘YouTube is full of home whitening advice videos, such as people showing how they brush hydrogen peroxide straight onto the teeth. These get a five-star rating but are irresponsible and dangerous.’

Dr Solanki says that botched homemade fixes and poor application of over-the-counter treatments account for an increasing number of patients seeking expert advice to make good the damage.

‘The credit crunch means people are trying to save money, but you have to draw a line,’ he says. ‘Some over-the-counter products are fine in principle, but without the expert guidance of a dentist, you could be causing damage that will cost you more in the long-run.’

‘Anyone considering dental procedures can get free advice from our panel of online. The Cosmetic Dentistry Guide can also put you in touch with your nearest cosmetic dentist. When it comes to whitening, the message is simple: don’t try this at home.’

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Sheffield dentists rewarded for preventive care^

A new strategy with the focus of preventing dental problems among children is be introduced in Sheffield, according to a report at www.yorkshirepost.co.uk.

Dentists in the city are being invited to sign a new contract that will encourage them to carry out more preventive work.

The changes are part of NHS Sheffield’s Dental Health Commissioning Strategy that outlines how services should be run up to 2011.

Key changes will come into force in March next year, when the current three-year dental contract comes to end.

The director of dental public health for Sheffield, John Green, said the current dental contract was very ‘activity focused’.

He said: ‘It focuses on treatment, which can be a bit of a problem, so at the end of the three years there is an opportunity to revisit it all and focus on other things, such as prevention, to try and stop teeth going bad in the first place.

‘There would still be recognition for carrying out treatment such as extractions and fillings, but dentists would also get rewarded for preventive work.

‘This would not only be good for dentists, but good for patients.’

Statistics reveal that, while the condition of children’s teeth in Sheffield is slightly worse than the national average, children in deprived areas suffer almost five times the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth than those in more affluent neighbourhoods.

Preventive work will therefore focus on those areas where children are more likely to develop dental problems, such as Burngreave, Darnall, Manor Castle, Gleadless Valley, Shiregreen, Brightside and Firth Park.

This will include increasing access to dental care, improving children’s diet and targeting oral health promotion at young children.

At present, fluoride is added to children’s milk in 42 primary schools in the city. This will continue, and the local NHS is also planning to begin talks on the possibility of adding fluoride to water.

New Oral Health Action Teams will be set up in certain neighbourhoods, to give out free toothpaste packs, introduce teeth brushing in before and after-school clubs and also offer support to health, social and education professionals working in these areas.

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‘Six-monthly check-ups’ hard to change, says CDO^

The Department of Health risked angering the profession last week by accusing NHS dentists of seeing their regular patients more often than necessary – preventing others from getting appointments.

However, chief dental officer Barry Cockcroft drew on his own years of practising to sympathise with the dental profession.

The DoH said new data showed many patients were being seen every six months when clinical guidance recommended that adults with healthy teeth generally needed to visit a dentist only once every two years.

It’s believed that changing the practice could free up as many as 800,000 appointments – 10% of the regular workload – for those currently struggling to see a dentist.

But Barry Cockccroft said: ‘I am aware from my own time in PDS how difficult it can be to change
something that has been part of the culture in dentistry for so long, butmany are doing it.

‘NICE guidance clearly says that there is no standard recall interval and that it should be agreed with each patient based on clinical need.’

He added: ‘As levels of disease drop and oral health improves we would expect recall intervals for more people to be longer than six months but always based on clinical need.’

DoH officials, who have compared records returned by NHS dentists, suspect some practitioners are intentionally recalling patients too often, or dividing courses of treatment and forcing patients to pay extra in order to boost their income.

But the CDO maintains it was a ‘small, but significant, number of contracts’ in which the recall intervals for patients was anomalous when compared with the majority of
their peers – and promised that PCTs will be looking at this with the providers.

He concluded: ‘Clearly it has no impact on incomes but does impact on patients and the
ability of the NHS to grow services.’

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It’s good news week^

Barry Cockcroft is in an upbeat mood when we meet in his office on the 11th floor of the DoH building on London’s South Bank. The office is surprisingly compact, but with a view overlooking the Thames that more than compensates. The response to the Commons Health Select Committee is due out in four days time, but he’s giving little away.
For a man of little available time, the CDO can spare an hour before catching a train to Warwickshire in his role as chief dental advisor to the government and where he practised for most of his dental career.
Is Friday 3 October a good day?
‘It’s been a great week,’ he says. He’s just completed a whistle-stop tour of the UK – out in the field, meeting dentists, opening new practices and promoting pioneering government initiatives on oral health – taking in Market Harborough, Nottingham, London, Durham, Darlington, Leeds and back again to London.

‘It’s a lifestyle that is hard work, but very rewarding,’ he insists. It’s a role he has held almost three years to the day (appointed 1 October 2005 initially as acting CDO) and also one that takes him away from his family home in Rugby a lot of the time. He has lived there since 1979, spending weekdays at his flat on the Isle of Dogs whilst seeing his wife only at weekends.

‘We have more intelligent conversation now than we did when I was at home,’ he jokes.
He enjoys Bolton Wanderers FC, rugby union, theatre and live music, listing guitarist Mark Knopfler, ballet dancer Darcey Bussell, heartland rock legend Bruce Springsteen and the obscure folk musician Eliza Gilkyson among the entertainers he’s seen live to date this year.

Travelling extensively – and needing to be contactable at all times – has meant he’s submitted to the all-essential BlackBerry that he both loathes and stubbornly spent two years rejecting. But he obviously values the time spent at home with his wife and family (his three children are not far away).

When asked for the three things he would take to a desert island, his answers are: ‘My wife (I better say that), a radio and a boat but definitely not my BlackBerry.’

Singing praises
He finishes off an email, apologising profusely for the delay, even though the scheduled time for the interview is 15 minutes away. He is courteous and chatty, but remains on his guard. He admits he is wary of the dental press, dismisses the national press, but sings the praises of the local newspapers who, he believes, don’t just focus on the woes of dentistry, but ‘do cover the good news, the new NHS surgery openings etc’. And you better believe him – he has a pile of cuttings as evidence to prove it.

The CDO is keen to promote the DoH preventive initiatives on oral health, the numerous openings of NHS practices across the country and the general ‘feel good’ factor when he’s out and about among ‘real dentists’.

It is his duty to defend to the hilt the April 2006 contract – and as chief advisor to the government, he has some urgent questions that need answering in less than a week. He says he sees the new contract now moving into another phase: less rigid, more localised and flexible with dentists and PCTs working together for the greater good etc… He constantly leaps from his desk, gathering evidence of these new government initiatives, calling on his PA, Joyce, to copy documents and fetch CDs and generally collate and offer up the ‘good news’ NHS dentistry has to offer.
What’s the next stage of the April 2006 contract, bearing in mind the criticisms in August’s damning report by the Commons Health Select Committee?

‘We took where we were in April 2006 and set up a formulaic trasition to a local contracting system – now – it can move into a more flexible phase with PCTs and dentists working together to create specific dentistry for specific areas – the fundamental is stability with growth.’
Although the report says the government’s goal of improving patient access had ‘not been realised’, the MPs involved did acknowledge assertions from Barry that the situation had stabilised and improvements would soon be seen.

He is keen to expand upon this, and maintains that with PCTs being given additional funds (that must be spent on dentistry) they would soon be meeting targets for patients and access.
That said, will all PCTs do this adequately? He admits ‘some are better than others’ but that ‘there are some outstanding PCTs’.

The government is on a mission to work with PCTs. So far, there have been three out of four planned NHS road shows on ‘Delivering Better Oral Health’, promoting the use of an evidence-based toolkit for prevention aimed at all interested parties. The move is to promote a more preventive form of dental treatment and 100 PCTS out of 150 so far have heard the message. Their job will be to implement this population-based preventive programme and commission ‘appropriate NHS primary dental services to meet local oral health needs’.
This, he says, is ‘not rigid and not target-based’ and insists that ‘dentists need to work with PCTs for it to work’, a sentiment echoed by the British Dental Association.
‘It’s got to be done locally,’ he adds.

He cites the groundbreaking dental initiative, trialled at a west-London branch of Asda, as a perfect example of the NHS reaching out to people – children mostly – some of whom have never seen a dentist. ‘This initiative is not about treatment, it’s about making a link,’ he says.
Earlier this year in Hounslow – an area of low take-up and hard-to-reach families – dental professionals pitched up in the supermarket and saw some of the area’s poorer children.
‘Out of those children who visited, 85% hadn’t ever seen a dentist,’ Barry explains. They piloted it for a week (Hounslow is health minister Ann Keen’s constituency) and plan to roll it out over the next few months with a view to educating those parents who have, until now, never taken their kids to the dentist. The radical government plan also involves a fluoride varnish for all children.
Barry says: ‘There is oodles of dentistry in London. The capital is well-served by dentistry, but the uptake is poor.

‘We have the best oral health in Europe in terms of children. It’s about education, via doctors, health visitors – and everybody involved in the healthcare of children, including parents. We need to educate the educators.’

And what’s to happen to the ‘unworkable’ child-only contracts?
‘The Health Select Committee said “We don’t like them and we don’t want them”. It really is an issue for PCTs locally but we don’t see a long-term future for restrictive contracts lilke these.’
He repeatedly expresses his weariness over the national press’s penchant for ‘creating the perception that there are no dentists’.

‘Probably because of its profile, dentistry is very important to people and it’s in the news a lot,’ he accepts. ‘But in Hull, like many other areas, they can offer a choice of an NHS dentist in a week. Also, NHS dentists are now advertising for patients, and many PCTs working with their dentist can now place the NHS logo outside practices to make them more visible. There should not be any uncertainty,’ he says, adamantly.

Pulling no punches

If NHS dentistry is on the up – and the good feedback that’s he getting from NHS dentists is to be believed – then how does he see the future of NHS dentistry and private practice co-existing in the dental market?

‘I think the important thing is we give patients an informed choice,’ he says. ‘I do have an issue when people have cosmetic dentistry that is not in their best interests. People should have it explained to them. Some private practitioners have been critical of services on the NHS and this is disappointing. But if you’re a long-established private practice with a good cohort of regulars, then you have nothing to fear,’ he adds.

But he pulls no punches when he points out that NHS dental care is both ‘cheaper and regulated’ and that many private practices now ‘want NHS contracts’ again.
‘And with a recession possibly just around the corner, private dentistry may not be popular for a while,’ he adds. He also seems amused at any threat of competition from dentists abroad offering a cheaper, alternative service to the NHS. According to his sources, he says, the much-publicised UK tour of an inflatable dental surgery staffed by Hungarian dentists – looking to attract dental tourists – has so far only provided transport packages for a handful of patients, and is really competing with the private market in the UK.’

Does he enjoy his role? ‘Dentistry at the moment is high profile: most of it in a good way. You need a thick skin, but I constantly get out and meet real dentists doing a real job and it’s good.’
When he initially took up the gauntlet, he continued practising for a while, until this became too much of a challenge.

‘Now when I’m out shopping at the supermarket, former patients come up to tell me how they’ve seen me on the television,’ he smiles. And finally, when did the country’s chief dental officer last see a dentist? Very recently, and yes, he ‘goes NHS’. And he’s laughing when he confesses the irony that he did once receive emergency dental treatment for a cusp fracture from one of his biggest critics – although as to exactly who, well… he’s keeping his mouth firmly closed!

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Dental leaders calls on DoH to back up claims^

The British Dental Association (BDA) has written to the Department Of Health asking for data to substantiate its accusations that dentists in England are ‘gaming’ the new general dental services contract.

The DoH allegation is that healthy patients are being recalled too frequently for check ups.

Responding, BDA executive board chair Susie Sanderson said: ‘The British Dental Association does not have the necessary data to comment on these suggestions.

‘If the Department of Health does, it should share that information so that it can be investigated and better understood.

‘The Interval between recalls is, according to NICE guidelines published in 2004 and supported by the BDA, a matter for a practitioner’s clinical judgement in consultation with the patient.

For adult patients, that interval is required to be between three and 24 months.

She added: ‘The significant problems with the new dental contract have been recognised this year by the House of Commons’ Health Select Committee.

‘Dentists across the country are working hard to deliver the best possible care for their patients despite those problems. What those dentists need is the support and constructive dialogue the profession has been calling for, not allegations of wrongdoing from the architects of the reforms.’

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UK stages first ever ‘health tourism’ show ^

The first ever ‘health tourism’ exhibition is being staged this weekend at London’s Olympia Two exhibition hall.

The show will be promoting medical and health options abroad – including dental treatment.

More than 100,000 medical trips are expected from the UK in 2009, with a total value of around £375 million.

And the total number of trips for treatment abroad is expected to climb past 200,000 by 2010.

Exhibitors at the The Health Tourism Show (25-26 October) will showcase their dental, cosmetic, elective, IVF and sports treatments.

Organisers say that with such a wide range of treatment options and ‘countries offering competitively priced surgery and dentistry it can be difficult to make the right decision when choosing treatments and medical facilities’.

Keith Pollard, the founder of Treatment Abroad, a website offering guidance to patients re: what they need to know before travelling for treatment, said: ‘It is vital that medical tourists arm themselves with as much information as possible before proceeding with any treatment, which is what we aim to do with our website.

‘Visitors to our seminars and stand at the Health Tourism Show will have the opportunity to understand and ask about what travelling abroad for medical tourism really entails,’ he added.

Recently, the General Dental Council (GDC) issued guidance and advice to dental tourists, with a checklist of questions to ask before travelling abroad for treatment.

The checklist, created in August, was produced in association with the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF), with a view to helping dental patients make informed decisions about their dental care, wherever they receive treatment.

People who consider going abroad to have dental treatment should get all the facts before they book an appointment.

The British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (BACD) has also warned potential patients that they need to carefully research the dentist who may be carrying out the work.

BACD Board member Tif Qureshi advised that is a good idea to check and see if a foreign dentist has a good portfolio.

He explained that this is often more important than considered the price of a procedure.

Mr Qureshi said that when going abroad to have veneers fitted, patients should look on the dentist’s website and see examples of previous work.

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GDC considers revalidation for dentists^

The General Dental Council (GDC) is seeking views on its proposals for the revalidation of dentists.

Revalidation means showing you continue to meet the standards set by the GDC to stay on its registers.

This is an early opportunity to contribute your views on any aspect of the GDC’s proposed revalidation process. A more formal consultation will follow before the details of the scheme are finalised.

Under the proposals, dentists will need to provide evidence in four key areas – professionalism, clinical, management and leadership, and communication. Evidence might include clinical audit, significant event analysis, patient surveys, and personal and practice development plans.

GDC President Hew Mathewson said: ‘We want revalidation to be as simple and flexible as possible, so we are committed to using existing and future quality assurance systems and locally gathered evidence.’

He added: ‘The first cycle of revalidation for dentists is not expected to start until 2011. By that time we should have thoroughly tested the system that is finally introduced.

‘Revalidation is about ensuring dentists continue to meet the standards expected of them throughout their careers. Patients can have even more confidence that their dentist is performing to a high standard and that those standards are being set and overseen by a regulatory authority – the GDC.’

A series of pilots are due to begin throughout the UK in early 2009. These will help the GDC assess how long it will take dentists to gather evidence required to revalidate, how easily it can be provided and how useful it is in the revalidation process.

About 100 dentists will participate in each pilot, and the pilots are likely to be run in Scotland and England with both NHS and independent dentists.

Once revalidation is up and running for dentists, the GDC will look at introducing a system for other groups of dental professionals on its registers.

For more information and to download the current proposals, please visit www.gdc-uk.org/revalidation. The GDC website will be updated as revalidation is developed.

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Dentists should help smokers quit^

Dentists should be given a bigger role in helping smokers quit their deadly habit, a leading member of the British Dental Association (BDA) has said.

Janet Clarke, chairwoman of the BDA’s central committee for community and public health, told a meeting on tobacco control that the potential of dentists to spot early signs of mouth and gum cancer and help people quit was often overlooked.

But she said, for the best results, the NHS contract would have to be changed so that dentists could be paid to offer preventive care to stop patients smoking.

Dr Clarke told a fringe meeting at the Labour Party autumn conference in Manchester, organised by the BDA and Cancer Research UK: ‘Tobacco use is a major issue in oral health, and we care about the damage to teeth and mouths as well as overall health.

‘It is a major risk factor for all cancer, and over 90% of people who develop oral cancer smoke or chew tobacco.’

Dr Clarke warned that the prevalence of oral cancer was increasing among the under-50s, who were more likely to have to live with the effects for longer.

She said: ‘Dentists want to see much tighter tobacco control. We see the effects of tobacco every day when we look in patients‚ mouths, we see diseased gums, stained teeth, and increasingly cases of oral cancer.’

Dr Clarke, who is a practising NHS dentist in Birmingham, described the potential for dentists to assist in health promotion as a ‘unique opportunity’, given the habits of many people to visit a dentist on a regular basis.

She told the meeting: ‘Dentists are well placed to spot signs of early tobacco disease. We can engage patients in smoking cessation activity. There is a role for dentists in giving preventive advice.’

Dr Clarke argued that the new dental contact, which gave primary care trusts the power to commission services, provided a ‘huge opportunity, potentially, for really imaginative commissioning’, including the placement of dentists in deprived areas or in schools to boost smoking cessation.

But, she added, paying dentists for completed courses of treatment based on the unit of dental activity (UDA) had led to the setting of ‘unrealistic targets’ that created a ‘disincentive’ for practitioners to carry out such preventive work.

Dr Clarke said: ‘We need to encourage PCTs to have set contracts with NHS dentists that get away from UDAs and have broad outcome measures linked to delivering more preventive care.’
She called for Primary Care Trusts to commission smoke cessation activity from dentists ‘so they can do it and be rewarded for it’.

Turning to Public Health Minister Dawn Primarolo, who also spoke at the meeting, Ms Clarke said: ‘Give us the tools to do the job properly when patients come to see us. Without changing any legislation, we could involve people working at the coalface a lot more.’

She added: ‘NHS dentistry is sometimes the forgotten NHS service. Dentists‚ potential can be overlooked. It is time to improve the integration of NHS dentistry in primary care and improve communication between doctors, health authorities and dentists, so our expertise can be used in the battle against smoking.’

Public Health Minister Dawn Primarolo told the meeting that seven out of ten smokers said they wanted to quit. Setting out plans to consider banning brand logos on tobacco packaging and removing cigarettes from public display in shops, she said: ‘We also have to make sure [cessation] services are there reaching out to people in the workplace, in communities, to parents, with advertising, through dentists, local authorities and community groups, so people are having the information provided to them.’

Richard Davidson, of Cancer Research UK, said the restrictions on smoking in workplaces, that came into force in England in July 2007, had resulted in a ‘sea change’ in behaviour, with more than 400,000 people quitting the habit in the first year since their introduction.

But, he added, 22% of the population still smoked and one in every two smokers would die as a result of a long-term habit.

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Top award for mouth cancer guru^

A doctor who says he has a ‘mission to raise awareness’ of mouth cancer has won a top award in recognition of his work.

Dr Vinod Joshi – founder of the UK’s leading mouth cancer charity, the Mouth Cancer Foundation – earned it for Best Patient Support Initiative at the Pfizer Oncology Awards.

Dr Chris Nutting, President of the British Oncological Association, presented him with his award – and a £1,500 research grant.

Dr Joshi achieved outstanding success through the restorative dentistry oncology clinic initiative to create a patient website and patient support charity.

In January 2002, he launched the UK website to cater for the unmet needs of his patients and similar patients across the nation, focusing on mouth cancer awareness, early Detection and patient information and support.

The unique feature of the members’ forum and message board added in 2003 enables patients and carers to offer each other support, advice and encouragement.

The Pfizer Oncology Awards are designed to recognise and reward teams as well as individuals who stand out from their peers – whatever their speciality, level of expertise or position.

Dr Chris Nutting says: ‘As President of the BOA, I am delighted to have chaired the awards again this year. It has been a genuine pleasure for me to review this year’s entries. They have all demonstrated a wide range of impressive achievements in oncology care.’

BOA provides a multidisciplinary forum for the presentation and discussion of cancer research and development.

Dr Vinod Joshi said: ‘Being awarded this award means so much. Mouth cancer is such a wicked, cruel disease and its treatment is debilitating. Unfortunately, many people have not heard of mouth cancer and so neglect the early signs; it is my mission to raise awareness of this disease.’

^1224720000^1549^Top award for mouth cancer guru^A doctor who says he has a ‘mission to raise awareness’ of mouth cancer has won a top award in recognition of his work.Dr Vinod …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/joshi.png
New 3-D bone tissue scaffold printer could speed bone regeneration^^1226275200^1570^New 3-D bone tissue scaffold printe…^^
Anaesthesia exposure may increase risk for childhood developmental disorders^^1225152000^1550^Anaesthesia exposure may increase r…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/anaesthesia-mask.jpg
Have you got your 5 core CPD subjects completed for 2008?^

If not, this seminar is the perfect way to ensure you obtain all the CPD that you need for the core recommended subjects requested by the GDC easily in one day of interesting lectures. Even if you have your CPD covered, this seminar is a great way to update your knowledge on these vital subjects:

• Medical emergencies with Nigel Robb (2 hours per annum)
• Disinfection and decontamination (1 hour per annum)
• Legal and ethical issues (1 hour per annum)
• Handling complaints (1 hour per annum)
• Radiography and protection (1 hour per annum)

Medical emergencies – The aim of the session is to update your knowledge and skills so that you and your team are fully equipped to appropriately manage the medical incidents that might occur in your practice.

Disinfection and decontamination – This session will look at best practice in decontamination in dental practice with an emphasis on quality assurance. It will demonstrate how to comply with good practice to satisfy clinical governance requirements to protect your dental team and your patients.

Legal and ethical issues – This session will update you with the latest legal issues in dentistry, particularly in relation to the GDC as well as the NHS contract, and ensure you have the necessary tools to identify and manage risk to reduce unnecessary costs you would have to pay out if an issue occurred.

Handling complaints – This session will look at the essential concepts of handling those difficult situations that arise when a complaint is received. Specific strategies for handling patients will be suggested along with a simple and effective complaints handling technique.

Radiography and protection – The aim of this session is to provide you with an up-to-date information in the core subject of radiography and radiation protection. This essential session will cover radiation doses in dental radiography and the factors affecting these doses. Aspects of digital radiography and cone beam technology will be also discussed.

CPD essentials on Friday 5 December 2008 at Royal College of Physicians, London.

7 verifiable CPD hoursThere is no easier way to gain your 5 core recommended subjects – book now! Call 0800 371652 or visit www.independentseminars.com

 

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Fall in A&E dental admissions^

A fall in the proportion of emergency hospital admissions triggered by dental problems has been hailed as a sign that NHS dental services are improving.

Figures published by the Department of Health (DoH) show there were 17,736 admissions via A&E under dental consultants in 2006/7 – the first year of the new NHS contract – representing 0.51% of total A&E admissions.

That was down from 18,930 (0.56%) the previous year, 2005/6. The A&E figures were warmly welcomed by the government, which has faced criticism for presiding over an increase in overall – including non-emergency – hospital admissions related to dental problems.

Separate DoH statistics published over the summer showed the number of hospital admissions where a dental consultant was responsible for the patient, including those admitted via A&E and elsewhere, rose by 20% from 200,519 to 238,967 in the years between 1997/8 and 2006/7.

Critics said the records showed people were being forced to go to hospital for treatment because they could not get an appointment with an NHS dentist.

In addition, back in May, researchers at Bristol University linked an increase in patients admitted to hospital with dental abscesses to problems over access to NHS dentists. The researchers said the increase represented a ‘major public health problem’ and seemed to be caused by ‘changes in service provision’ over a number of years that reduced access to dental care.

At the time, Professor Damien Walmsley, the scientific adviser to the British Dental Association, called for a ‘careful investigation’ to find out why admissions for abscesses had increased so dramatically.

But the latest figures from the Department of Health – published in a Parliamentary answer by Health Minister Ann Keen in response to a question by Shadow Health Secretary Andrew Lansley – show only that fewer patients with dental problems are being admitted to hospital via A&E.

A DoH spokeswoman said: ‘The decrease in patients admitted to A&E for dental treatment reflects the growing strength of local dental services. It’s great to see further evidence that the extra £209 million we invested in NHS dentistry this year is already making a real difference on the front line.’
Ms Keen revealed that plans were in place for the Information Centre for health and social care to make available some information about the reasons why patients attend accident and emergency departments – on top of existing records on admissions via A&E.

^1225238400^1553^Fall in A&E dental admissions^A fall in the proportion of emergency hospital admissions triggered by dental problems has been hailed as a sign that NHS dental services ar…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/hospital.png
Galway pupils missing out on dental screening^^1225324800^1555^Galway pupils missing out on dental…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/school-sign.jpg
IDH bring in Chris Barrow^

We listen in to an announcement by Chris Barrow about his new venture with IDH.


^1225411200^1556^IDH bring in Chris Barrow^We listen in to an announcement by Chris Barrow about his new venture with IDH.^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/idhbarrow.png
Website awards shortlist announced^

The deadline for entering the 2008 Dentistry\.co\.uk Website Awards passed two weeks ago and the shortlist of finalists has been put together for all to see.

The standard of the entries were exceptionally high and the level of improvement over last year is incredibly apparent.

The website awards sponsored by Dental Focus Web Design are run in order to recognise excellence in dental practice website design. Websites can be an incredibly powerful marketing tool for any dentist and if you don’t have a strong presence on the internet you could be missing out on valuable patients.

It is essential that you have a good website to portray the right image to potential patients. The Dentistry.co.uk Website Awards 2008 look for the best websites that are also most likely to generate new patients for the practice.

The Shortlist

BEST private practice website

Best NEW private practice website

Most IMPROVED private practice website

BEST mixed practice website

Best NEW mixed practice website

Most IMPROVED mixed practice website

BEST specialist practice website

Best NEW specialist practice website

Most IMPROVED specialist practice website

BEST NHS practice website

Best NEW NHS practice website

Most IMPROVED NHS practice website

 

 

^1225411200^1557^Website awards shortlist announced^The deadline for entering the 2008 Dentistry\.co\.uk Website Awards passed two weeks ago and the shortlist of finalists has been put togethe…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/webawardspic.png
Preventive Dentistry Practice of the Year Award – Could it be you?^

The Preventive Dentistry Practice of the Year Award is designed to recognise the UK practice with the strongest, best established and well though out preventive ethos, whether it be NHS, private or mixed. As a team, you will successfully communicate the oral health message to your patients, you will work together to raise oral health standards and you will regard prevention as your number one priority above all else.

Who will be judging?

An independent panel of judges including members of the Preventive Dentistry editorial board will compile a shortlist of four finalists from all entries received, at which point the position of power is passed over to you, the readers of Preventive Dentistry.

The four finalists will be presented in the first issue of 2009 (excerpts from their entries will be published). The readers will be asked to vote for the practice that they believe deserves the title of Preventive Dentistry Practice of the Year 2008. The practice that receives the most votes will be crowned the winner.

How do I enter?

To enter, submit your details and 500 words explaining why your practice deserves to win. You may submit as much material as you wish to support your claims such as photographs (please send hard copies as well as electronic), patient testimonials or PR.

The more effort you make to present clear reasons why you should win, the more impressed the judges will be. The cost for entering the competition is £15 per practice.

If you would like to enter, please email Lesley Foster (Lesley.Foster@fmc.co.uk) asking for an entry form.

Is there a prize?

If you are lucky enough to win, you will be exposed as an example of excellence to dental practitioners up and down the country. You will also win £500 for your practice to spend as you wish. Perhaps you could use it for a sophisticated team night out, or that new piece of equipment you’ve had your eye on. This Award will help you get your practice the recognition it deserves.

What is the deadline?

All entries must be received by Friday 22 December 2008.  Email lesley.foster@fmc.co.uk to enter.

Thanks to our sponsor

Thank you to our official sponsor, Oral-B – without this support the Award would not be possible.

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Dentists warned over implant qualifications^

Concerns about implant dentistry standards have led to the General Dental Council (GDC) to remind all dentists that they must only undertake procedures that they are properly trained and competent to do.

Dentists currently doing implant dentistry, and those considering branching into that area, are being urged by the GDC to read guidelines published by the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK), Training Standards in Implant Dentistry.

The guidelines make clear the minimum training the GDC would expect dentists to have successfully completed before undertaking implants.

In a new policy statement, the GDC has confirmed that it will refer to these guidelines when assessing complaints against dentists who have allegedly practised implant dentistry beyond their competence.

The guidelines – which the GDC considers the authority on training standards for this procedure – make clear that inserting dental implants is a surgical procedure that should only be carried out by dentists with suitable training.
This would normally involve a postgraduate training course in implant dentistry and an assessment of competence.

Training can come from a variety of sources including university, Royal College or hospital-based programmes, as well as from courses run by commercial groups or individuals.

Hew Mathewson, GDC President, said: ‘We have concerns that some dentists have been carrying out this very invasive procedure without having completed adequate training and an assessment. It’s essential for patient safety that dentists have had sound postgraduate training before doing it.

‘Dentists who are already practising implant dentistry, as well as those thinking about getting into it, need to read the Royal College guidelines and understand the level of training we expect them to have achieved.’

The GDC’s policy statement is at www.gdc-uk.org/Our+work/Education+and+quality+assurance/Policy+statement+on+implantology.htm

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Implant costs vary, survey reveals^

There is a huge variance in the cost of implants being charged by UK dentists, according to new research.

The price being quoted by dentists varied from between £1,000 and £2,500. The research revealed that 43.5% of dentists said that on average they charged under £1,500 for an implant but 22% said the average cost was £2,000 or more.

The independent research for Implantium, a newly launched provider of dental implant solutions, was conducted amongst a representative sample of 50 dental practices from across the UK in August.

Implantium says that one of the main reasons why the cost of dental implants vary so much is because of the huge difference in prices being charged by manufacturers and distributors.

Implantium is looking to help drive down the cost of implants by under cutting the average market price by 45%.

Jason Buglass, a dentist and managing director of Implantium said: ‘Many Britons lack self-confidence as a result of their teeth. Dental implants make a dramatic difference to a person’s appearance and can have a huge impact on their confidence. We are looking to make dental implants a more financially realistic proposition for people by enabling dentists to drop their price for this service.’

To find out more about the training programmes offered by Implantium, visit www.implantium.co.uk.

^1225670400^1560^Implant costs vary, survey reveals^There is a huge variance in the cost of implants being charged by UK dentists, according to new research. The price being quoted by dentists…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/cash-funds.png
Dentist back on register two years after treatment left boy brain damaged^

A dentist struck off after his treatment left a six-year-old boy with permanent brain damage has been restored to the Dentists Register two years on.

Whilst under the care of Michael Ellis Jones, the child was left brain damaged by ‘unjustified’ doses of drugs, including ketamine, through a routine procedure to remove six teeth in August 2004.

Mr Jones was subsequently erased from the Register in October 2006 when the Professional Conduct Committee (PCC) found he’d failed to:
• rehearse emergency procedures
• ensure the patient’s parents had received appropriate written pre- and post-operative instructions
• give them an adequate explanation of the conscious sedation technique proposed
• ensure they had given informed consent to the treatment proposed
• ensure that the sedationist accepted the principle of minimum intervention.

Mr Jones applied for restoration to the Dentists Register in September this year and the Committee restored his name to the list, dependent on compliance with a number of conditions to remain in place for three years.

In coming to the decision, the GDC disciplinary committee noted that ‘a lengthy period of erasure… would remove forever from practice a dentist who, prior to this tragic incident, had an unblemished career’.

The committee stated that it had considered carefully the seriousness of the findings, including the serious harm to the child, and noted the considerable efforts made by Mr Jones to maintain his clinical competence and standards since erasure.

It noted his commitment never again to provide dental treatment to patients who are under conscious sedation.

The conditions that he must adhere to for the next three years include not providing conscious sedation or administering dental treatment to patients who are under conscious sedation and placing himself under the supervision of a nominated workplace supervisor.

^1225756800^1561^Dentist back on register two years …^A dentist struck off after his treatment left a six-year-old boy with permanent brain damage has been restored to the Dentists Register two …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/gavel.png
Dental surgeries given cash to cut wait times^

Health bosses in Leicester are giving an extra £370,000 to dentists to make it easier for people to get NHS treatment, the website www.thisisleicestershire.co.uk reports.

The cash – part of a £1 million spending plan announced in September – will be spread across 25 of the city’s dental practices.

The money will pay for dentists to provide additional ‘units’ of treatment – and all of those must be used on patients who have been waiting for more than two years to see a dentist, estimated at 3,000 people.

Dentists and campaigners have welcomed the move by NHS Leicester City, but said more needs to be done to ensure everyone can get NHS treatment.

For more information on how to see one of the dentists, call 0116 295 7011.

^1225843200^1562^Dental surgeries given cash to cut …^Health bosses in Leicester are giving an extra £370,000 to dentists to make it easier for people to get NHS treatment, the website www…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/moneypig.png
Revamp for dental school^

The dental annex at Cardiff University’s School of Postgraduate Medical and Dental Education has been refurbished, bringing together staff and students within the dental section.

Disused dental clinics in the annex have been converted to 25 workstations for full and part-time tutoring and administrative staff.

First Minister Rhodri Morgan, who officially opened the new facility, said: “This is an important development for the School of Postgraduate Medical and Dental Education.

‘The expansion in the student intake in the dental school, from 55 a few years ago to 64 today to 75 in 2010, a 33% increase, has to be backed up by growth in continuing dental education in Wales.

‘When the new Cynon Valley Community Hospital opens in a couple of years, it will include a £10m dental primary care centre linked to the dental school at UHW, so that our dentistry students can be educated to do outreach work in communities, where there are many challenges in oral health,’ he added.

‘That is why I believe this is the most exciting period yet for oral health in Wales.’

^1225843200^1563^Revamp for dental school^The dental annex at Cardiff University’s School of Postgraduate Medical and Dental Education has been refurbished, bringing together s…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/rrhodri-morgan.png
Cash injection for dental practices^

Dental practices across Coventry are taking on new patients in a bid to stop youngsters developing tooth decay – thanks to a £1.5 million cash injection, according to www.coventrytelegraph.net.

NHS Coventry has awarded the extra cash so that dentists can do more preventive work.

Sixteen of the 33 NHS dental practices in Coventry have signed up to expanding their capacity, with a focus upon preventative work for children.

Alison Walshe, director of planning and performance at NHS Coventry, said: ‘This is such good news for patients throughout Coventry – and we hope they will take advantage of the extra dental capacity we are creating.

‘The added invest ment means that we can continue to make sure that anyone in Coventry who needs an NHS dentist can find one easily – and it will play a key role in improving the dental health of our local communities, particularly children.

‘We encourage parents taking their children for a check-up to ask their dentist about using fluoride varnishes or fissure sealants, both of which are techniques to prevent decay getting through to their teeth.

‘Ultimately we are aiming for a big reduction in the number of extractions and fillings the city’s children will need in years to come.’

More than 20 dental practices across Coventry are taking on new NHS patients and NHS Coventry runs a helpline for anyone who would like help finding a dentist.

Patients can call the helpline on 024 7624 6033 and leave a message.

People can also check for themselves where the nearest NHS dentist is by using the NHS Choices website at www.nhs.uk.

^1225843200^1565^Cash injection for dental practices^Dental practices across Coventry are taking on new patients in a bid to stop youngsters developing tooth decay – thanks to a £1….^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/cashinjection.png
‘Dr’ title for dentists sparks row^

A move by dentists to request they be called by the title ‘Dr’ so as to fit in with other EU countries has sparked controversy.

Dentists are demanding the right to call themselves by the title ‘Dr’, giving them the same privileges as their counterparts in other European countries.

But the call has upset medical doctors, who complain that dentists could mislead patients about the extent of their expertise.

The General Dental Council (GDC) says: ‘The GDC does not prohibit the use of the title ‘Doctor’ as a courtesy title in the case of dentists. Dentists who choose to use the title must ensure that it is not used in a way which could mislead the public, for example by giving the impression that the dentist is a registered medical practitioner if they are not.’

Recently, a private surgery in Knutsford was ordered to stop calling a dentist ‘doctor’ in adverts for facial surgery because the advertising authorities deemed it ‘misleading’.

The private Woodvale Clinic used dentist John W Stowall’s honorary title in a magazine advert offering ‘a comprehensive range of services to achieve an improved youthful and attractive appearance’, including ‘facial fillers and lip enhancements’.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) said although Mr Stowall is a specialist in surgical and oral dentistry, the use of Dr was ‘ambiguous’ and ‘misleadingly implied’ he is qualified to conduct facial surgery.

Dentists insist that more widespread use of the term would not confuse patients and would only bring Britain into line with the rest of Europe, where it is commonplace.

But Dr Jonathan Fielden, chairman of the British Medical Association’s consultants committee, called for dentists to be banned from using the term, to protect patient safety.

‘Patients have a right to clarity and to be secure in the knowledge that the person treating them is competent and qualified to do so,’ he said.

‘Certain titles can sometimes mislead patients into thinking people are medically qualified when they are not. We think it’s important that patients can establish whether or not the person treating them is medically qualified. The title used by the person treating them is thus of crucial importance.’

A spokesperson for the British Dental Association (BDA) said: ‘The length of training for medical and dental students is similar – for three years there is a crossover point between the two groups, i.e. they study a similar curriculum, and dentists do a vocational year which is similar to the medics doing a post-registration year.’

And Peter Ward, chief executive of the British Dental Association (BDA) said: ‘We believe that dentists should be permitted to use the courtesy title ‘Dr’ should they wish and provided that it is not done in a way which might mislead patients as to their qualifications.’

‘The GDC has no objection to the title and its use is becoming widespread.’

^1225929600^1566^ ‘Dr’ title for dentists sparks…^A move by dentists to request they be called by the title ‘Dr’ so as to fit in with other EU countries has sparked controversy.D…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/doctor.png
New business skills course from BDA^

A new BDA Masterclass seminar to help dentists and their teams enhance the patient experience, perfect their communications skills and develop more effective business plans is to be launched by the British Dental Association (BDA).

The event, Advanced business and communication skills for dental practices, will be led by top-flight speakers from the world-respected Henley Business School.

It will also feature an interactive session analysing participants’ communication styles and techniques.

Sessions on the one-day course will tackle subjects including improving the patient experience, enhancing the profitability of the business and developing a convincing business plan.

The interactive afternoon session will look at determining personal communication styles, the advantages and disadvantages of different styles and employ an actor to demonstrate different communications techniques that can be applied in business situations.
 
Peter Ward, Chief Executive of the BDA, said: ‘Communication and business skills are vital to the success of dental practices. This seminar brings dentists the very best advice from leaders in the field and provides clear ideas of how their knowledge can be translated to improve the everyday performance of the practice.’
 
Details of the seminar, which was developed with the support of the British Dental Trade Association (BDTA), are available at: www.bda.org/events. It will first be held at London’s Café Royal on 28 November 2008.

Seminars will also take place at The Novotel Birmingham Centre on 6 March 2009 and the Radisson Edwardian Manchester on 10 July 2009.

Delegates can book online or by calling the BDA on 020 7563 4590.

^1226016000^1568^New business skills course from BDA^A new BDA Masterclass seminar to help dentists and their teams enhance the patient experience, perfect their communications skills and devel…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/BDA-Logo-281-pantone.png
Research venture a first for dental school trio^

A joint venture between three of the UK’s dental schools A move to develop research collaboration between the University’s Dental School, the Dental School at Cardiff University and the Peninsula Dental School in Plymouth is to be launched and discussed at a research symposium in Devon next week.

It is the first time in the UK that three dental schools will come together formally to discuss being proactive about joint research opportunities.

The objective of the collaboration is to use and combine the complementary talents and skills found in the three schools so that major research funding can be attracted to South Wales and the West Country.

Developing top-class research in the region will ensure local dental patients benefit from the highest standards of care and enhance the region’s international reputation for quality and excellence in dental research.

Speaking ahead of the event, Professor Jonathan Sandy, Head of Bristol Dental School, said: ‘This is an important collaborative research meeting to explore the possibilities of increasing research opportunities. There is now a realisation that schools need to collaborate to maximise their research potential.

‘The three dental schools cover an area which accounts for 10% of the UK population which should enable ‘bench-to-bedside-to-bench’ research in basic and population sciences.’

Professor Liz Kay, Dean at the Peninsula Dental School, added: ‘We are delighted to be hosting the first collaborative symposium between the Peninsula Dental School and the dental schools at the University of Bristol and the University of Cardiff. We firmly believe that, between the three institutions, we have the knowledge, skills and expertise that can make South Wales and the West Country an international centre for dental research of the highest quality. We look forward to developing sustainable and lasting research relationships that will truly contribute to the science of dentistry, and the dental health of patients in our region and around the world.’

Professor Elizabeth Treasure, Dean of the School of Dentistry, Cardiff University said: ‘Developing research that impacts patients locally, regionally and globally depends on the sharing of knowledge across the profession to advance treatments that produce real results for patients. The School of Dentistry is the only one of its type in Wales, providing unique and important leadership in dental research, teaching and patient care, and we are very excited to be able to be part of this symposium which is the start of strengthening research collaborations across the three institutions.’

The first South West & Wales Dental Schools’ Research Symposium will take place at the Thurlestone Hotel in South Devon. The keynote address will be given by Professor Bill Shaw, Professor in Orthodontics and Dentofacial Development at the University of Manchester, followed by discussions on research themes including population and clinical science, education research, microbiology and vascular research, and experimental pathology and biology. Professor Sir John Tooke, Dean of the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, will welcome delegates to the symposium and chair the first day.

The symposium will also see presentations from established experts and rising stars of dental research from each institution, including Dr Andrea Waylen and Dr Angela Nobbs from the University of Bristol, Dr. Simon Moore and Dr. Lindsay Davies from Cardiff University, and Hayley Kyte from the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry.

^1226016000^1569^Research venture a first for dental…^A joint venture between three of the UK’s dental schools A move to develop research collaboration between the University’s Dental Scho…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/business-table.png
Dental Council establishes clinical dental technician role^^1226361600^1571^Dental Council establishes clinical…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/denture-impression.jpg
Dental surgeries given cash to cut wait times^

Health bosses in Leicester are giving an extra £370,000 to dentists to make it easier for people to get NHS treatment, the website www.thisisleicestershire.co.uk reports.

The cash – part of a £1 million spending plan announced in September – will be spread across 25 of the city’s dental practices.

The money will pay for dentists to provide additional ‘units’ of treatment – and all of those must be used on patients who have been waiting for more than two years to see a dentist, estimated at 3,000 people.

Dentists and campaigners have welcomed the move by NHS Leicester City, but said more needs to be done to ensure everyone can get NHS treatment.

For more information on how to see one of the dentists, call 0116 295 7011.

^1226361600^1572^Dental surgeries given cash to cut …^Health bosses in Leicester are giving an extra £370,000 to dentists to make it easier for people to get NHS treatment, the website www…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/cash-funds.png
New national health literacy campaign launched^^1226448000^1573^New national health literacy campai…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Health-Literacy.jpg
Call centre rated one of the best in Britain^

Denplan recently celebrated coming second only to First Direct in The Top 50 Call Centres for Customer Service, achieving 91.32%.

The Top 50 Call Centres for Customer Service is judged by the customers themselves. In the survey, a staggering 98% of the mystery callers found Denplan’s call centre easy to use, with 95% satisfied or extremely satisfied with their call experience.

Reliability was rated 94% and queue management was rated at 96%. In resolving a caller’s query in the initial call, Denplan was rated 98%.

To identify what makes a good calling experience this benchmarking research was undertaken across the country by people who regularly contact organisations using call centres.

Feedback was collated to understand the difference between a positive and negative call and was incorporated into a mystery calling questionnaire.

Mystery calls were then made by 20,000 customers and the winners were determined by the results.

^1226448000^1574^Call centre rated one of the best i…^Denplan recently celebrated coming second only to First Direct in The Top 50 Call Centres for Customer Service, achieving 91.32%.The Top 50 …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Denplan-Call-Centre-Awards-.png
Website Awards 2008. The results are in…^

We’re pleased to be able to officially announce the winners of the Website Awards 2008, sponsored by Dental Focus Web Design.

It’s evident that websites are now essential marketing tools for dentists and practices already utilising them are reaping the rewards.

The quality of entries this year has been spectacular and massively exceeded our expectations. This meant that in many cases it was almost too close to call between entries and this is testament to the excellent standard received. Well done to all those that participated and winner or not, you can be very proud of your achievement.

Remember that there is one further award that isn’t being announced today – The Best Overall Website. This award will be announced and received by the winner on stage at the prestigious Dentistry Awards on 12 December. All entries below will have the chance of winning this award. For more information about the Dentistry Awards please click here.

Congratulations to the following winners and runners-up:

Winners

Best website

Private – Dereham Dental Health

Specialist – B Dental

NHS – Watling Street Dental

Mixed – Smile Essential

Best new website

Private – Belle Vue Dental Practice

Specialist – B Dental

NHS – Lewisham Dental Practice

Mixed – Maison Smile

Most improved website

Private – Queens Park Dental Team

Specialist – Maple House Orthodontics

NHS – Lewisham Dental Practice

Mixed – Newport Pagnell Dental Clinic

Highly commended runners-up

Best website
Private – Bow Lane Dental

Specialist – Maple House Orthodontics

NHS – White House Dental Practice

Mixed – Newport Pagnell Dental Clinic

Best new website

Private – Dental Dimensions

Specialist – Dream Implant

NHS – Watling Street Dental

Mixed – Newport Pagnell Dental Clinic


Most improved website

Private – Hoburne Dental Practice

Specialist – Pentangle Dental

NHS – Watling Street Dental

Mixed – Lewisham Dental Practice

^1226534400^1575^Website Awards 2008. The results ar…^We’re pleased to be able to officially announce the winners of the Website Awards 2008, sponsored by Dental Focus Web Design.It’…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/webawardspic.png
Report outlines the benefits of oral cancer screening examination^^1226534400^1576^Report outlines the benefits of ora…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/OSullivan-EleanorJAP_9458.jpg
Continuing professional development set to be mandatory by 2010^^1226620800^1578^Continuing professional development…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/old-dental-texts.jpg
Experts call for Government backing against mouth cancer^

Britain’s leading oral cancer specialist has used a House of Commons speech to call on government for backing to beat the disease.

Dr Saman Warnakulasuriya, speaking at the British Dental Health Foundation’s launch of Mouth Cancer Action Week 2009, called on government to join dentists to further support the fight to help people stop smoking.

Tobacco is linked to 80 per cent of all cases of mouth cancer, which kills one person every five hours in the UK.

Keynote speaker Prof Warnakulasuriya – explaining the mouth was among the top-three organs most susceptible to cancer-causing carcinogens – took the opportunity to address MPs and leading figures from the dental community.

He said: ‘A lot needs to be done – and I am pleased we are here with politicians who have the will and the power to take this forward.

‘We have achieved a ban on public smoking, but we need to protect children from smoking, in terms of the way sales are restricted.’

Calling for dentists to be given power to prescribe smoke-cessation aides, he continued: ‘I am a dentist, and I think we all have an important task to help people quit, and refer people to smoking cessation clinics. I promote the use of mouth cancer screening, and we need to think how dentist can be compensated for this particular activity.’

With under-secretary for health Ann Keen MP on the guestlist, launch attendees were joined by shadow front bench health minister Mike Penning MP, Labour health campaigner Rosie Cooper MP, chief dental officer of England Dr Barry Cockroft, Welsh counterpart Dr Paul Langmaid and BDA chief executive Peter Ward.

The Foundation’s campaign week, which begins this Sunday 16 November, calls for action on mouth cancer – whether wearing the campaigns Blue Ribbon Appeal badge, visiting the dentist for a check-up, or a self examination for ulcers which do not heal within three weeks, red and white patches in the mouth, or unusual lumps and swellings.

^1226620800^1579^Experts call for Government backing…^Britain’s leading oral cancer specialist has used a House of Commons speech to call on government for backing to beat the disease.Dr S…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Mouth-Cancer-Enamel-Ribbon.png
New Deputy Chief Dental Officer^

Sue Gregory has been appointed as the new Deputy Chief Dental Officer at the Department of Health.

Sue will replace current Deputy Chief Dental Officer, Tony Jenner, who is leaving the Department of Health after six years.

The appointment will take effect in January 2009.

Sue is currently the Consultant in Dental Public Health for Bedfordshire, Luton and Hertfordshire Primary Care Trusts.

She chairs the UK Consultants in Dental Public Health Group and was President of the British Association for the Study of Community Dentistry in 2006-07.

Sue was also previously Honorary Secretary, and then President, of the British Society of Disability and Oral Health.

Tony Jenner announced he would be stepping down as Deputy Chief Dental Officer to work voluntarily as a consultant to the Global Child Dental Health Taskforce, that aims to significantly improve the dental health of children in the developing world.

Dr Jenner, who has worked at the Department for six years, said he would continue to provide support to the NHS from his retirement.

Sue Gregory said of her appointment: ‘I look forward to working in Barry Cockcroft’s team and to the challenges that this appointment will bring me. The excellent foundations that Tony Jenner has made towards further improving oral health in this country are a fantastic legacy on which to build.

‘There are tremendous opportunities to move forward with local commissioning, working with the NHS, PCTs and the dental profession, to secure the future for delivery of dental care and oral health.

Chief Dental Officer Barry Cockcroft, welcoming Dr Gregory’s appointment, said: ‘Her experience in active local commissioning will prove particularly invaluable in helping Primary Care Trusts to ensure that their resources reach the best and most appropriate local dental services.’

Paying tribute to Dr Jenner, Dr Cockcroft said: ‘It has been a real pleasure to work with Tony Jenner over the last six years. Tony has been closely involved with changes to legislation that have enabled consultation on water fluoridation, and has made a significant contribution to the development of Choosing Better Oral Health and publication of the prevention toolkit –
achievements of which he should be truly proud.’

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Dental students sink teeth into patient care^

The first of dental students on the University of Central Lancashire’s (UCLan) BDS Graduate Entry Dentistry programme have begun their second year of intensive training and are now working with real patients in the community.

The 32 second-year students are now based in one of four brand new Dental Education Centres (DECs) situated in Carlisle, Accrington, Morecambe and Blackpool, as they embark on their second year of the four-year programme.

Since the students started in September 2007, they have developed their skills on simulators as well as learning the theory of dental practice.

The first year was based at the new £5.25 million dental school at UCLan in Preston.

They have also had to pass 13 exams since January to ensure they are ready to see real patients.
Their clinical training at the DECs will be supplemented by further lectures, some via video links with the School of Dentistry in Preston, Lancashire.

Head of the School of Dentistry, Lawrence Mair, commented: ‘The second-year students are settling in well at the DECs, following a two-week induction programme at the individual sites.

‘The students have now started seeing patients who are currently on the NHS allocation list, under the close supervision of their tutors at the DECs.

‘They will be carrying out simple routine treatments and emergency care, including scale and polishes, fillings and simple tooth extractions.

‘Research has shown that most dentists stay in the area in which they trained and so we hope to be able to provide more qualified dentists for the north-west and help allay the current shortage.’
To find out more about Dentistry at UCLan, visit: www.uclan.ac.uk/dentistry or call 01772 895900.

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Europe rates Ireland as ‘intermediary’ for dental affordability^^1226620800^1582^Europe rates Ireland as ‘intermed…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/piggy-bank.jpg
Cash boost for oral cancer saliva test^

A research company has received a cash injection of £20,000 to develop a saliva test for oral cancer.

GFC Diagnostics was awarded a Grant for Research and Development worth £20,000 by the South East England Development Agency (SEEDA) to fund the development of the novel test for smoking.

The test detects cotinine (a breakdown product of nicotine) in saliva to identify smokers and monitor changes in their smoking habit.

This Micro Grant will mean that the company will be able to develop a new type of cotinine test, based upon its patented SafeTube technology.
 
Dr Graham Cope, in association with the Birmingham Dental Hospital, found that cotinine levels were closely associated with oral disease, especially of the gums; as smoking has profound effects upon gum inflammation, reduces healing and increases tooth loss.

The study showed that patients who were given the test result also increased their chances of quitting smoking.

This study was later published in the British Medical Journal.

The leader of the research, Professor Iain Chapple, Professor of Periodontology, said: ‘Among healthcare professionals, dental surgeons are often in contact with the population and are in an ideal position to provide counselling and advice on smoking cessation. Even basic measures aimed at smokers who are contemplating quitting have an important effect.’ 

Cotinine is universally accepted as the most sensitive and reliable test for detection of smoking.

Currently, most tests detect cotinine in urine; however this is not really appropriate in a dental surgery.

Also, there is increasing interest from the insurance industry in using saliva because it can be collected in public, under the eyes of the examiner, so there is no possibility of switching or adulterating samples – a common problem when testing urine for illicit drugs.
 
Bruce Savage, a co-founder and director of GFC Diagnostics, stated: ‘We are very grateful to receive the grant from the South East England Development Agency. This grant will enable the company to develop a product for detection of cotinine in saliva for which there is already considerable interest and which the company predicts could generate significant sales income in the future.’
 

^1226880000^1583^Cash boost for oral cancer saliva t…^A research company has received a cash injection of £20,000 to develop a saliva test for oral cancer.GFC Diagnostics was awarded a Gra…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/mouth-cancer.png
Patients opt for more natural teeth whitening ^

Patients are seeking a more natural smile in a backlash against the bright, white celebrity smile.

More and more people are choosing natural-looking dental procedures to improve their appearance, according to a leading group of dentists across Britain.

‘Teeth say so much about the financial and emotional wellbeing of a country,’ says Dr Kailesh Solanki of the Cosmetic Dentistry Guide.

‘After years of excess and extreme makeovers, people are now holding back to have a great smile without drawing too much attention to themselves.’

In the past, Brits have been copying the American fashion of blindingly white teeth, says Dr Solanki.

‘But now it seems that people in the UK are looking for a subtler, maybe even classier, approach to their smiles.

‘Simon Cowell and Jodie Marsh would have asked for eight on the whitening scale. Number six, which is an off-white shade, is now much more fashionable.’

Dr Solanki says that leading dentists featured on www.cosmeticdentistryguide.co.uk who collectively see 11,000 patients a week, have reported a reduction in extreme whitening. The number of whitening treatments however, has remained unaffected by the credit crunch.

‘Teeth whitening is still the number one treatment and remains as popular now as ever,” says Dr Solanki. ‘In fact, cosmetic dentists are still doing good business in the run-up to Christmas. However, patients are choosing to restrain their results, meaning they get a more natural-looking smile.’

‘Prior to the credit crunch, patients would be aiming towards the whiter end of the scale, but now they are holding back. That is undoubtedly a reflection of the times.’

^1226880000^1585^Patients opt for more natural teeth…^Patients are seeking a more natural smile in a backlash against the bright, white celebrity smile.More and more people are choosing natural-…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/simon_cowell.png
Dentistry Awards 2008 – the shortlist^

The wait is nearly over – after weeks of deliberation, our judges have made their choices.
The quality of entries has been so high this year that it was far from an easy task, but we can finally announce the finalists that will be duking it out for a prestigious Dentistry Award.
As the tension builds, all eyes are turning towards Leicester, where the winners will be revealed amidst a blaze of glamour at the official ceremony on 12 December.
So without further ado, let us present the shortlist for the 2008 Dentistry Awards in full:

Best Young Dentist

Scotland
Philip Friel – Hyndland Dental Centre
Mike Gow – The Berkely Clinic
Christopher McCrudden – Cherry Bank Dental Spa

Northern Ireland
Philip McLorinan – Dunmurry Dental Practice
David Nelson – Bangor West Dental & Implant Clinic

North West
Natwar Tibrewal – Gencare Dental Clinic, Huddersfield
Daz Singh – Ollie & Darsh
Kailesh Solanki – Kiss Dental

North East
Dave Thomas – Thompson & Thomas
Dr Melbourne Carew – Genix Healthcare Dental Clinic, Middlesbrough

The Midlands
Saaqib Ali – Sherwood Dental Practice
Kalpesh Bohara – The Dental Suite

East
Stephen Pitt – The Dental Studio
Bhavin Bhatt – Smile & Wellbeing

London
Lydia Pink – Blackheath Village Dental Practice
Dr Chaw-Su Kyi – Welcome

South West & Wales

Philip McCauley – South Coast Dental Specialist
Steven Hinchcliffe – Weston Aesthetic Dental Centre

South East

George Triantafyllidis – Tooth Smart
Rishi Soni – Haslemere Dental Centre
Komal Suri – Smile Design

Best Team

Scotland
Fergus & Glover
Stafford Street Dental Care
The Gentle Touch
Cherry Bank Dental Spa

Northern Ireland

Dunmurry Dental Practice
Bangor West Dental & Implant Clinic

North West
Liverpool Implant & Aesthetic Dental Spa
Cahill Dental Care Centre
Tracey Bell

North East
Orthoscene Ltd
Thompson & Thomas
Woodseats Dental Care
The Forum Dental Studio
The Dental Healthcare Centre

The Midlands
Sherwood Dental Practice
The Dental Suite
The Priors Dental Practice
Natural Smiles Dental & Beauty Spa

East
The Dental Studio
The Smile Boutique
White Rose Dental Studio
London
SparkleDental Boutique
Crescent Lodge
Metrodental

South West & Wales
The Barn Dental Cosmetic Clinic
The Smile Suite
Dental Dimensions

South East
Aesthetics
Tooth Smart
Haslemere Dental Centre

Best Practice

Scotland

Fergus & Glover
Stafford Street Dental Care
Infinity Blu

Northern Ireland
Dunmurry Dental Practice
Comber Dental Practice
Bangor West Dental & Implant Clinic
Lisburn Dental Spa
Gentle Dentle

North West
Gencare Dental Clinic – Huddersfield
Tracey Bell
Liverpool Implant & Aesthetic Dental Spa

North East
The Dental Studio
Wetherby Orthodontics
Genix Healthcare Dental Clinic – Marske
Genix Healthcare Dental Clinic – Middlesbrough
Orthoscene Ltd
Gencare Dental Clinic
The Dental Healthcare Centre
The Midlands
The Priors Dental Practice
Highfield Dental Clinic
Sherwood Dental Practice
Denton Dental Care
Beacon Dental Care
Natural Smiles Dental & Beauty Spa

East
Smile & Wellbeing
The Dental Studio
Longwood House Dental Care
Bushfield Dental Practice
Lavender Barn

London
Sparkle Dental Boutique
Metrodental
Welcome

South West & Wales
The Barn Dental Cosmetic Clinic
Bath & Bristol Periodontal Clinic
The Smile Suite
Green Room Dentistry

South East

The River Dental & Cosmetic Clinic
Aesthetics
Smile Essence
Rosebank Dental Practice
Haslemere Dental Practice
Abi Dental

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT

Elaine Sharp – NHS Lanarkshire Oral Health Team
Dr Philip J Friel – Hyndland Dental Centre
Michael Gow – The Berkeley Clinic
Bhavin Bhatt – Smile and Wellbeing
Jane Armitage – Thompson & Thomas
Sarah Glover – Birdgate Dental Practice
Colette Murphy – Tooth Smart
Edward John Crouch – Sherwood Dental Practice
Dr Edward Lynch
Dr Chaw-Su Kyi – Welcome
Sharon Holmes – Dental Arts Studio

There are still a few tables left at the awards ceremony on 12 December. To book your place at this illustrious evening event, contact Elisa Allen on 01923 851734.

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Health Minister opens day surgery unit at Antrim Area Hospital^^1226966400^1587^Health Minister opens day surgery u…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/dental-surgery.jpg
New help for dentists and doctors with addictions^

Fresh help is at hand for doctors and dentists who have an addiction or other health problems.

The practitioner health programme, initiated by the National Clinical Assessment Service, part of the NHS, will offer confidential support and treatment to practitioners with alcohol, drug or mental health issues.

Dr Clare Gerada, Vice-President of the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP), is to lead the new support programme for impaired doctors and dentists, to be launched in London.

Doctors and dentists are often reluctant to seek help because they fear they may be recognised – or worry about putting their career in jeopardy.

But the launch of this specialist service may help push them to seek the treatment they need.

The government-funded project expects to see 500 cases a year and addiction to drink or drugs is expected to be a common concern.

Dr Gerada, founder of the RCGP substance misuse unit, works for the Hurley group of five GP practices in South London that has won the contract to deliver the new service.

‘Doctors and dentists are sometimes unwilling or unable to access local health services. This service will help them resolve the issues they may have,’ said Dr Gerada.

‘We will seek to work with patients at the first opportunity, offer them a supportive environment and provide solutions that will enable them to continue to practise, or return to work safely,’ she said.

The website’s – www.php.nhs.uk – welcome message to dentists and doctors reads: ‘The Practitioner Health Programme is a free, confidential service for doctors and dentists who have mental or physical health concerns and/or addiction problems and who live or work in the London area. Any medical or dental practitioner can use the service, where they have: a mental health or addiction concern (at any level of severity) and/or a physical health concern (where that concern may impact on the practitioner’s performance).’

For confidential advice and an appointment please telephone 0203 049 4505 or email php.help@nhs.net

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Guide by King George III’s dentist up for auction^

A dentistry guide written by the dentist to King George III and detailing painful methods such as using pliers on crooked teeth is to be auctioned next week, reports www.telegraph.co.uk.
 
One of the first books detailing the art of dentistry, it highlights why anyone scared stiff of a visit to the dentist should be grateful they were not around 250 years ago.

Thomas Berdmore, the royal dentist of the time, reveals in detail painful methods used on patients to cure tooth problems.

He does, however, also show that he was ahead of his time, warning that smoking and sugar were bad for anyone seeking the perfect set of teeth.

Berdmore’s royal patronage made him wealthy and the most respected expert in his field, earning him an ample fortune.

Yet it is unlikely that many modern dentists, or their patients, would give him too much time.

In a series of gruesome insights, he details how teeth should be straightened using gold wire.

If that fails, the alternative was to ‘break the teeth into order by means of a strong pair of crooked pliers’.

He urges youngsters with milk teeth to chew upon coral, wax and suchlike bodies to deter decay.

And he points out that ‘the boyish custom of carrying a table or chair in their mouth is as dangerous as it is absurd’.

He recalls one case in which he was summoned to examine a patient left in a terrible state following a visit to a local dentist.

He wrote: ‘A young woman aged 23 went to a barber dentist to have the left molaris tooth of the upper jaw on the right side taken out.

‘On second attempt he brought away the affected tooth together with a piece of jawbone as big as a walnut and three neighbouring molars.’

The barber dentist embarked on the ill-fated second extraction bid, wrote Berdmore, because he was uneasy at disappointment with his first effort.

The book, A Treatise on the Disorders and Deformities of the Teeth and Gums and the Most Rational Methods of Treating Them, was written in 1770. It is still bound in its original calfskin and will be auctioned next week in Derby. It is expected to fetch £300.

Charles Hanson, the auctioneer, said: ‘People moan about how hard it is to see a dentist nowadays, but in Berdmore’s day it might have been better just to stay away.

Some of the practices recommended in his book are almost grotesque – and this was a highly respected man who treated the monarch.’

^1226966400^1589^Guide by King George III’s dentis…^A dentistry guide written by the dentist to King George III and detailing painful methods such as using pliers on crooked teeth is to be auc…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/king-george1.png
Sour sweets ‘like eating battery acid’, dentists warn^

The recent craze for sour sweets could be creating future health problems for children’s teeth, dentists in America warn.

And the popular sweets can, in many cases, contain acid levels so high that it approaches the ph level of battery acid,

This is according to the California Dental Hygienists’ Association (CDHA) that issued a warning recently to parents about the dangers of ‘sour’ sweets.

Sour sweets come in dozens of varieties, including hard, soft, chewy, gummy, gels, liquid sprays, crystals, foam sprays, powders and chewing gums.

Most people think this type of confectionery is safer because it has less sugar, but they don’t know that the acid content is toward the extreme end of the acidic spectrum

With repeated exposure and frequency, ‘sour’ sweets can also lead to a host of oral health problems, including increased cavities, tooth sensitivity, staining, soft-tissue sensitivities and loss of shine.

The CDHA offered the following tips:
• Avoid, limit or seriously reconsider choosing or eating sweets labelled ‘sour’ or ‘tart’
• Look for the following acids on the back label of ingredients and avoid them: citric, lactic, malic, tartaric, fumaric, adipic, ascorbic
• Don’t be fooled by ‘concentrated fruit juice extracts’ – is a code phrase for ingredients that can be highly acidic
• If you choose to consume sour sweets, rinse your mouth with water immediately afterwards to reduce the damaging effects from the acids
• Don’t brush your teeth directly after eating sour sweets as the toothbrush and toothpaste are abrasive; this will scratch and will remove more of the already softened enamel

Most consumers are so focused on eliminating sugar that they have not paid attention to the newer and more serious ingredients containing multiple acids that make the ‘sour’ sweets so tart and appealing, but also make teeth more susceptible to oral diseases.

In Minnesota, its dental association is launching a public awareness campaign called ‘The Power of Sour on Your Teeth’.

The campaign includes educational materials for teachers and school nurses, and posters and brochures that are being made available to every dental association in the US.

^1227052800^1592^Sour sweets ‘like eating battery …^The recent craze for sour sweets could be creating future health problems for children’s teeth, dentists in America warn.And the popul…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/sour-sweets.png
Mobiles loosen dental fillings, study reveals^

A study from an Iranian university has found that the electromagnetic radiation emitted from mobile phones can cause the mercury in fillings to loosen and be released.

The study, conducted by the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences using 14 students, measured the amount of mercury present in their urine after use of a mobile phone.

The study states: ‘The microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones has a significant impact on the release of mercury.’

The reason for this appears to be that the sealing components used to shield the rays are the same used to shield the fillings in teeth, causing the mercury to become separated.

^1226966400^1591^Mobiles loosen dental fillings, stu…^A study from an Iranian university has found that the electromagnetic radiation emitted from mobile phones can cause the mercury in fillings…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/mob-funky.png
Hien Ngo’s back in the UK!^

One of the world’s leading lecturers in minimal intervention, Professor Hein Ngo, is returning to present for one day only. 

His main focus in research revolves around the management of caries and the interactions between the glass-ionomers and the dental issues.

Attending this seminar will provide an integrated understanding of the practice philosophy and introduce new clinical techniques such as Surface Protection and Internal Remineralisation.

Balancing the oral environment and biofilm for good oral health has been a difficult quest for both patients and clinicians.

However, the cause and progress of caries has advanced to the extent that entirely new ways of managing caries are now possible.

Technological innovations in recent years have provided dental professionals with a host of new tools to identify and heal early lesions. 

Hien has been a technical consultant to many dental organisations and was co-inventor of several dental products.

He has published and lectured extensively internationally and he was instrumental to the establishment of the Minimal Intervention 2020 projects in Adelaide and other dental schools in South East Asia.

To book your place at this exclusive seminar or to receive more details please call Independent Seminars on 0800 371652, email seminars@fmc.co.uk or visit www.independentseminars.com.

^1227052800^1593^Hien Ngo’s back in the UK!^One of the world’s leading lecturers in minimal intervention, Professor Hein Ngo, is returning to present for one day only.  His main foc…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/hien_Ngo.png
2,600 North Yorkshire patients get NHS dentist^

More than 2,600 patients in York and Selby were allocated an NHS dentist last month, slashing the waiting list by 90%, according to www.thepress.co.uk.

Only 112 patients remain on the waiting list in the York and Selby area – a dramatic drop from the 2,123 patients who were waiting this time last year.

The latest figures show that North Yorkshire and York Primary Care Trust (PCT) has invested more than £13 million in new NHS dental contracts so far this financial year.

Amanda Brown, the PCT’s assistant director of commissioning and service development, hailed their success in finding more NHS dentists.

She said: ‘The recent investment in NHS dental centres – including the new ADP practice in York – has seen a marked reduction in waiting lists across the PCT.

‘In North Yorkshire and York as whole, we have registered over 22,000 patients with an NHS dentist in the past six months.

‘We will continue to work with dentists in the area to create further capacity.’

Patients wishing to register with an NHS dentist are added to the PCT’s dental database.

They will then be registered with an NHS dentist as soon as a space becomes available.

Some people will ask to join the database for a particular practice, which can extend their wait.

Since the launch of the dental database in 2004, the PCT has registered 86,483 people across North Yorkshire.

Anyone in North Yorkshire wishing to join the database can register their details by phoning 01904 724107 or emailing nyy-pct.dentalregistration@nhs.net They can also register by writing to NHS Dental Waiting List, FREEPOST NEA 13107, York YO31 7ZX.

^1227052800^1594^2,600 North Yorkshire patients get …^More than 2,600 patients in York and Selby were allocated an NHS dentist last month, slashing the waiting list by 90%, according to www.thep…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Big-red-lips.png
MBE for NHS dentist^

A South Tyneside dentist has been honoured with an MBE for his ‘services to NHS dentistry’.

Matthew Gill, a partner at Dean Road Dental Practice, was presented with an MBE by Prince Charles at Buckingham Palace in London.

And Mr Gill, from Whitburn, says he still has no idea who nominated him for the honour.

The 37-year-old said: ’It was a special day, a fabulous experience and something I will remember for my whole life. I feel lucky and very privileged to have received this honour; I would love to thank the person/s who nominated me as I still have no idea who they are.

‘It hasn’t altered my day to day life, I am still enjoying the work I do; but I do have a big smile on my face whenever I remember the day.’

And Prince Charles seemed well-informed with the state of the dental industry.

Matthew added: ‘He was quite chatty, and said “I understand getting an NHS dentist can be quite difficult these days”. My reply: we are very fortunate that in South Shields we have quite a few NHS dentists, but other parts of the country are not as fortunate.

‘He asked some other questions about dentistry and seemed very well informed and a very pleasant person. He did give me a big smile, his teeth were very good, slightly crowded but very clean.’

Matthew was one of 100 people receiving the award on the day, one of them being chat show host Paul O’Grady.

‘Whilst waiting for my turn I had a chat with quite a few of the other people who were waiting, one of them was called Paul O’Grady, and until afterwards I had no idea that he was famous,’ he added.

^1227225600^1596^MBE for NHS dentist^A South Tyneside dentist has been honoured with an MBE for his ‘services to NHS dentistry’.Matthew Gill, a partner at Dean Road …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Matthew-Gill-MBE.png
Smiles as the Peninsula figures rocket^

The Peninsula Dental School, the first new dental school in the UK for 40 years and established in 2006, has received news that the level of applications to its course has risen by a phenomenal 122%.

This is more than double the number of applicants in 2007 and far in excess of national trends, where applications for dentistry are up by 10%.

There is a ratio of just under six applicants for each place, putting the Peninsula Dental School on a par with much longer-established dental schools that offer a four-year graduate entry course.

The news comes hard on the heels of a unique dental research collaboration initiated by the Peninsula Dental School, involving it and dental schools at Cardiff University and the University of Bristol.

It is hoped that the collaboration will achieve an international reputation for quality and excellence in research, putting the South West and South Wales on the map for innovative and quality research, and that local dental patients will also benefit from the highest standards of care because it will be directly informed by quality science.

Professor Liz Kay, Dean of the Peninsula Dental School, commented: ‘Words cannot express how delighted we are to hear that the Peninsula Dental School’s popularity has risen so steeply with those wishing to make dentistry their career.

‘My thanks go to my colleagues, who have constructed a first class and innovative dental course and who have marketed it so successfully to the dental sector and prospective students; to our partners in the local NHS and local government who have provided us with vital support; and last but by no means least to our current students, who have embraced the objectives of our course and who are already building an excellent reputation for themselves in the field of dentistry.”

She added: “We will be interviewing over 200 candidates for the course, and we look forward to welcoming those we select in September 2009.”

More information about the Peninsula Dental School is available by logging on at www.pms.ac.uk/dentistry.

^1227225600^1597^Smiles as the Peninsula figures roc…^The Peninsula Dental School, the first new dental school in the UK for 40 years and established in 2006, has received news that the level of…^
New oral sex-cancer link is ‘extremely disturbing’ ^

A clear link has been made between mouth cancer and the sexually transmitted human papilloma virus (HPV), reports the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF).

A simple oral rinse has been hailed as a potential lifesaver – studies show the rinse could help spot HPV occurrences early and prevent their spread.

New research has also suggested the Gardasil vaccine, currently prescribed for cervical cancer, may prove effective for males in preventing HPV.

The cancer virus is transmitted through oral sex, and is thought to contribute to the doubling of mouth cancers in young men in the last decade.

Foundation chief executive Dr Nigel Carter described the link as ‘extremely disturbing’, speaking during Mouth Cancer Action Week in November.

Leading US HPV expert Maura Gillison MD PhD – who discovered the link between HPV and oral cancer, plus the further risks in taking multiple sexual partners – published new research on HPV links as the oral rinse on November 15, the eve of the 2008 Action Week.

Foundation chief executive Dr Nigel Carter BDS LDS (RCS) said the research must now move people to take action to protect themselves from mouth cancer.

‘As young people become more sexually active, this link certainly helps to explain the disturbing rise in mouth cancer cases among younger men,’ said Dr Carter.

‘In the last 10 years, the percentage of males under the age of 45 with mouth cancer has risen by almost a third.

‘New techniques and treatments are vital to our population’s health as we take action against this disease. We hope, in the first place, the public will heed our campaign slogan: “if in doubt, get checked out.’

Gillison linked 20,000 new cases of mouth cancer to HPV over a five-year period, arguing the risks posed are a worrying new trend.

HPV, the most common sexually transmitted virus, is already accountable for 98% of cervical cancers.

 

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Setback for city’s fluoridation plans^

Hampshire County Council is refusing to support proposals to add fluoride to local water supplies.

And this could prove a blow to Southampton Primary Care Trust (PCT), which is hoping to add fluoride to the taps of Southampton to help solve the city’s poor oral health record.

The County Council will now send its views to the South Central Strategic Health Authority (SHA), which was responsible for launching the three-month public consultation that is due to end on 19 December.

The SHA will also receive views from Southampton City Council, which recently voted 26 to 18 in favour of the measure. A final decision on the proposals will be made by the SHA in February 2009.

The decision of Hampshire County Council comes hot on the heels of nearby Test Valley councillors who have also rejected the proposal.

County councillors concluded that more research and reassurances are required before Southampton City PCT takes any further steps with its proposals.

A panel was set up by the Council’s Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee to investigate the benefits and risks associated with artificial fluoridation.

Leader of Hampshire County Council, Councillor Ken Thornber, said: ‘We all understand the desire to eradicate poor oral health, particularly for children who may suffer from significant pain and distress. However, there is not the evidence that water fluoridation is the answer.

‘The Water Fluoridation panel found a lack of robust and reliable scientific evidence to support the proposals. It also reported that scientists and health professionals have recognised that there are still “unknowns” in relation to the effect of fluoride, not just on teeth, but the body as a whole.

‘The Southampton City Primary Care Trust wants to improve the oral health of specific communities in Southampton but their proposals will impact on people in South West Hampshire who do not have the same problems of poor dental health. There may be some benefit to some children living in the affected area but there is also a strong possibility that children with otherwise healthy teeth may develop a degree of fluorosis. It is not fully understood if there are other health effects to a population that has fluoride added to drinking water.

‘It is our view that there are other more targeted measures that the Primary Care Trust could and should explore to improve the oral health of those communities it specifically wants to help. There needs to be more research and consultation carried out before such a significant step as adding fluoride to drinking water is taken.’

The decision was welcomed by pressure group Hampshire Against Fluoridation (HAF), who said they were ’particularly delighted with the thoroughness of the report’ carried out by the Council’s Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee.

Stephen Peckham, a member of HAF and a reader in health policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said: ‘The Scrutiny Panel took a wider view, taking evidence from a broader field. In terms of detail and research, they were very thorough.

‘Their recommendations are, in some ways, very good – basically saying we don’t know enough about fluoridation and its effectiveness or the health consequences. That’s their bottom line and it’s also Hampshire Against Fluoridation’s bottom line.

‘We feel sealants and gels are more effective than water fluoridation in improving oral health. Targeted work such as this is much, much better.’

Back in the summer, Dr Andrew Mortimore, public health director for Southampton City PCT, said: ‘Southampton City PCT believes water fluoridation is the most effective way of reducing the large numbers of tooth fillings and extractions currently needed by children in Southampton.

‘Local dental health surveys show that oral health is poor with 42% of the city’s children experiencing dental decay by the age of five. This is clearly unacceptable when dental decay is a preventable disease. Everyone drinking fluoridated water – including children, adults and the elderly – will begin to benefit as soon as fluoridation is started and measurable benefits would be apparent in about five years.’

To see Hampshire County Council’s Water Fluoridation Panel’s report, visit http://www.hants.gov.uk/decisions/decisions-index/index-docs-6955.html.

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Drinking green tea protects your teeth^

Many types of beverages can hurt your teeth because they contain sugar and acids, particularly citric acid.

But if you have a habit of drinking beverage, there is one type you can drink safely, that is, home-brewed green tea, a study finds.

According to the study published in the July/August issue of General Dentistry, home-brewed green tea is better than black tea when it comes to tooth protection.

For the study, Mohamed A. Bassiouny, DMD, BDS, MSc, PhD compared green and black tea to soda and orange juice for their effect on human teeth.

They found that tea, just like water does not have an erosive effect.And green tea is better than back tea due to its natural flavonoids and antioxidants.

But if you drink tea, you are advised not to use any additives such as milk, lemon or sugar.

Tea should be home brewed and you should avoid prepackaged iced teas that contain citric acid and high amounts of sugars.

Academy of General Dentistry issued a statement about the study and offered the following tips:
• Reduce or eliminate carbonated beverages. Instead, drink water, milk, or tea
• Skip the additives such as sugar, lemon, and milk
• Drink acidic drinks quickly and through a straw
• Chew sugar-free gum to increase saliva flow in your mouth
• Rinse with water to neutralise the acids, and wait an hour before brushing

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Action week puts mouth cancer on the agenda^

An emotional and compelling campaign ensured 2008’s Mouth Cancer Action Week increased awareness of the disease both within the dental community and the wider public domain.

The campaign, organised by the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF) and launched at the House of Commons last month, saw practices up and down the country play their part in an issue where dentists can make a real difference.

Mouth cancer claims one life every five hours, with nearly 5,000 cases each year. With more than 40,000 blue ribbon badges distributed throughout the UK, the November campaign week followed in the footsteps of the previous annual events by continuing to raise awareness.

Sponsored by Denplan, who sent posters to practices across the UK, and Vizilite Plus, this year’s focus took a more positive stance as a newly-named Mouth Cancer Action Week.

Health professionals across the land helped promote the slogan ‘if in doubt, get checked out’ – stressing the importance of early detection, which boosts chances of surviving the disease to more than nine in 10.

The Westminster launch provided an ideal platform to kick the week off in a high-profile fashion. A moving speech by cancer survivor and novelist Lia Mills set the tone of determination to beat the disease.

Shadow health minister Mike Penning MP joined politicians and leading figures in the dental industry at the launch, before filing an Early Day Motion calling for government support in the bid to tackle oral cancer.

Keynote speaker Professor Saman Warnakulasuriya joined the chorus, seeking legislation to give dentists powers to prescribe stop-smoking treatment, plus compensation for oral screening.

The risks of smoking and chewing paan, guthka, or areca, which contribute to 80% of oral cancers, were a focus of the week. Alcohol plays its own part in increasing risks amongst frequent drinkers, while more and more cases display none of the routine risks.

Later in the week the Foundation donned its scientific cap to continue discussions of oral cancer and its links to the human papilloma virus (HPV) via oral sex.

Support from TV and radio as well as national, local and trade press helped the campaign achieve a circulation of more than 60 million viewers and readers.

BDHF chief executive Dr Nigel Carter was delighted with the response. He said: ‘What has been really pleasing is the sheer number of surgeries and PCTs taking part, through free screenings, decking the walls with our posters, sporting blue ribbon badges and working hard to highlight the campaign.

‘We have seen mouth cancer discussed in the corridors of power, and public health can only benefit from these efforts.’

Visit www.mouthcancer.org.

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Registration at a click^

Dental professionals can now pay their GDC annual retention fee, update their contact details and check the details on their practising certificate before it is printed, all via the web. This is thanks to the GDC’s new self-service website e-GDC at www.gdc-arf.com.

The new website means GDC registrants can keep up to date and take care of their admin at any time, day or night, when it’s convenient for them.

Edward Bannatyne, GDC director of operations said, ‘The launch of e-GDC should make life a lot easier for our registrants. It aims to take the hassle out of simple things like updating your contact details and checking your practising certificate has been sent out. Now you can manage your registration at your convenience, and not just during office hours.

‘A range of additional online services are planned for next year too. You will soon be able to submit your annual CPD declarations online as well as set up a paperless direct debit to pay your annual retention fee. Meanwhile, I’d welcome your feedback on e-GDC. Please send your comments and suggestions to our Processing Manager, Anne Gerulat, at agerulat@gdc-uk.org.’

To protect individuals’ personal information, the GDC has built a number of security measures into the new system.

New e-GDC users will need to create an account. They will then be sent an initial password and PIN, which they will need to use when they first log in. Each time a user logs in they will need to answer a security question.

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Extra regulation for Wales’ private dentists^

Legislation coming into force next year is to add another level of regulation to Welsh dentists offering private care to their patients.

The Private Dentistry (Wales) Regulations 2008 will take effect from 1 January 2009, requiring practitioners providing any non-NHS dental treatment to register with the Healthcare Inspectorate Wales (HIW).

The HIW is the healthcare regulator for Wales, under the Care Standards Act 2000.

Once the legislation comes into effect, it will be responsible for inspecting and regulating private dental provision (both individuals and premises) across the country.

The act will cover wholly private and mixed practice dentists alike, and comes in addition to any NHS performer list obligations.

Clinical dental technicians are currently exempt from the legislation.

Dentists already in practice will be granted a six-month ‘transition period’, needing to submit a completed application form (available from the HIW website, www.hiw.org.uk) by 30 June 2009.

Any dentists not practising in the country before 1 January, but who wish to offer private dentistry in Wales from next year, will need to register with HIW before they can provide any private treatment at all.

This applies to all dentists, including non-UK nationals, locums and vocational dental practitioners.

The Welsh Assembly maintains it has tried to ‘minimise the level of bureaucracy’ in the process for existing private dentists.

Practitioners offering private work but still on the NHS dental performers list will only need to supply a statement that they are complying with the regulations (and will continue to do so), provide the name and address of the local health board they are listed with, and give details of any conditions imposed on them by the GDC.

They will also need to supply an enhanced criminal records certificate.

The chief dental officer for Wales, Dr Paul Langmaid, was positive about the impact of the legislation.

He said: ‘These regulations will ensure that private dental treatment in Wales is regulated to the same high standard as NHS care. Uniformity of regulation between NHS and private care is important as many patients often choose to supplement their NHS care with private treatment, often from the same dental practice.

They will provide a mechanism for continuous improvement in both the provision of private dental treatment and clinical governance throughout primary dental care in Wales.’

He added that registering practitioners will help identify where wholly private care is being offered as well as highlighting the movement of dentists between different dental practices in the country.

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Access to NHS dentistry declines again^

A million fewer adults and more than 200,000 fewer children have been able to access an NHS dentist in England since the Government implemented reforms to dentistry in April 2006, according to official figures published today.

The NHS Information Centre report reveals that 19,348,000 adult patients were seen by an NHS dentist in the 24 months up to 30 June 2008, compared to 20,348,000 in the 24 months up to 31 March 2006.

The same period saw the number of children able to access NHS dental care drop from 7,797,000 to 7,587,000.

Prior to the implementation of the reforms the Government estimated that approximately two million people who wanted access to NHS dental care were unable to get it.

Reacting to the figures, BDA Chief Executive Peter Ward said: ‘These figures provide yet more evidence of the problems created by the Government’s 2006 dental reforms. More than 1.2 million fewer people in England are able to access an NHS dentist now than was the case before the reforms were implemented.

‘That means that, according to the government’s own figures, there are more than three million people in England alone who want access to NHS dentistry but can’t get it.

‘Patients who are able to access care are confronted with a system driven by targets that discourages modern, preventive care. That is difficult for dentists, who want to focus on providing the best possible care for their patients.

‘Problems with the NHS dental reforms are well documented and have been acknowledged by the Department of Health. For the good of patients and dentists alike, it’s time for them to enter into the long-overdue dialogue necessary to resolve these problems.’

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Public wades into fluoride debate^

Health officials running the consultation into proposals to fluoridate Southampton’s water supply have reported an ‘unusually’ large response from the public.

The Strategic Health Authrity (SHA) said it had received 5,000 replies from residents of Southampton and surrounding areas, including letters, emails, forms and postcards sent by campaign groups.

They included 1,000 responses to a feedback form received just days after it was sent out to more than 110,000 homes.

The SHA believes it is ‘very possible’ the form, which asks residents to detail their views on fluoridation, will generate a higher number of responses – before the process ends on 19 December – than the usual 2-5% return rate found in typical health consultations.

The SHA has held eight drop-in events, each lasting eight hours, where local people have been invited to find out more information and ask questions.

It has organised three question-time debates, all of which were filmed and made available on the SHA’s website for later viewing.

It is also hiring polling organisation, ICM, to conduct a phone poll of 2,000 randomly selected residents to test the views of people ‘in the middle’ of the two sides.

Kevin McNamara, who is leading the public consultation for the SHA, said: ‘The consultation is as comprehensive as we can get, and we are doing well over and above what we are required to do by law.’

The pressure on the SHA to carry out the consultation properly is acute, with strong views on both sides of the debate.

The SHA, as organiser of the consultation, is expected and determined to remain ‘objective’ on the debate, and has gone to great lengths to head off allegations of bias, including asking an independent analyst to compile a report on the responses to the feedback forms and inviting opponents of fluoridation to debate the proposals at question time events.

Mr McNamara said: ‘It shows you the importance with which we take the need to make sure the consultation is carried out properly. We have to remain objective.’

The SHA has stressed the consultation is ‘not a vote’, and it is not bound to follow the majority view. Instead, it hopes to use the results to help establish what the views of the public are to help inform its decision.

Anyone wishing to respond to the consultation can do so at www.southcentral.nhs.uk/fluoridation by 19 December.

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DDU offers new dates for CPD courses^

The Dental Defence Union (DDU) has joined forces with experts from King’s College London, to offer two further courses for all members of the dental team – worth 12 hours of verifiable CPD.

The courses will be held in Stratford-upon-Avon on Wednesday 25 February and Thursday 26 February 2009 and will cover topics such as complaints, radiography, medical emergencies and infection control, all part of the GDC’s recommended core CPD subjects.

Rupert Hoppenbrouwers, head of the DDU, said: ‘We had a great response from delegates who attended this year’s London CPD courses, which were fully subscribed, and we are looking forward to hosting them again in the West Midlands.

‘The courses are a great opportunity for all members of the dental team to hear leading experts discuss a broad range of important dento-legal issues. All delegates will receive a signed certificate confirming their completed CPD hours.

‘Now that CPD is compulsory for Dental Care Professional (DCPs), we are also delighted to be able to offer DCP members of the DDU a complimentary place on the course if they are accompanied by a full paying delegate.’

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Good oral health – a must in the fight against AIDS^

A US dental school is leading the effort to raise awareness in the importance of oral health as part of World AIDS Day today (1 December).

Forty million people worldwide are living with HIV/AIDS and from the onset of the epidemic, oral health problems were identified as key indicators of the disease.

There are approximately 80,000 people living with HIV in the UK and about a third of these don’t know that they are infected.

The epidemic is still growing in the UK with around 7,000 new diagnoses every year. Even if someone you know is living with HIV, they may not feel able to tell you.

Antiretroviral treatment has reduced both the mortality and the morbidity of HIV infection But according to a professor at the University of Southern California School of Dentistry.

‘Medications are allowing people with HIV/AIDS to live longer, more productive lives, but they also create another set of oral health issues – saliva, the body’s natural cleansing process, is disrupted, prompting the development of oral lesions in many of these patients,’ says Dr Mahvash Navazesh, professor with the USC School of Dentistry.

Ninety per cent of people living with HIV have one or more HIV-associated oral lesions over the course of the disease.

‘These lesions are often a harbinger for the disease’s progression to full-blown Aids,’ says Dr Veronica Green, assistant professor of Clinical Dentistry with the USC School of Dentistry.

She adds: ‘Access to oral health care, both for the person at risk for HIV infection and the person already living with HIV, is critical.’

For the HIV-positive person who is unaware of his/her condition, lack of access to dental care represents missed opportunities for an early screening, diagnosis and testing for HIV.

Oral symptoms provide dentists with the clues to diagnose the disease before the patient has seen his or her own health care provider or been tested for HIV.

For details, visit www.worldaidsday.org.

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Make sure you tell the dentist what medication you’re taking!^

Do you regularly take aspirin or antiplatelet medications? Do you know whether or not these drugs should be stopped before dental procedures or surgeries?

According to a study published in the May/June issue of General Dentistry, the clinical, peer-reviewed journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), stopping antiplatelet medications prior to a surgical procedure places a patient at greater risk of permanent disability or death.

The probability of a patient bleeding depends on the over-the-counter and/or prescribed drug or combinations of drugs.

‘A thorough drug history should be reviewed prior to any procedures,’ notes Mary Aubertin, DMD, lead author of the study.

Dr Aubertin recommends that the dentist and patient start with a simple discussion.

‘The dentist and the patient should discuss the risks and benefits of treatment with or without the drugs versus no treatment and include the patient’s physician’s opinion in the decision making process. This will allow everyone involved to understand and prevent medical risks.’

Fortunately, due to the prevalence of this type of medication, dentists are prepared to treat these situations.

According to AGD spokesperson Carolyn Taggart-Burns, DDS, ‘excessive bleeding is a major concern with many dental procedures due to the extensive prescribing of blood thinners in America. Heart disease is so prevalent that many patients are on these drugs, which can complicate even the simplest procedure.’

Dr Taggart-Burns reminds patients that it is very important ‘to communicate medical history with your dentist so that they can provide the best care possible.’

What happens after a procedure is also important to the dentist.

Patients who experience excessive bleeding or bruising after the surgery, in spite of applying pressure to the site with wet gauze or a wet teabag for 20-30 minutes, should contact the dentist for evaluation and treatment.

‘Informing the dentist of medical issues is the first step. Working with the patient’s physician and the patient to develop a plan is also important. Last, staying healthy is the best way to have a successful procedure,’ says Dr Taggart-Burns.

What you should do before a dental procedure:

* Schedule a consultation with the dentist

* Disclose all prescribed and over-the-counter medicines to your dentist

* Disclose your medical history and concerns

* Discuss the risks and benefits of treatment with or with out the drugs

* Ask the dentist if they have an office emergency plan.

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Hat-trick of awards for dental innovators^

A team of dentists and physicists scooped a hat-trick of awards last night, having developed new technology that could one day replace dental X-rays.

The Infrared Imaging system developed by Professor Nigel Pitts and Dr Chris Longbottom at Dundee and Professor John Girkin and Dr Simon Poland at Strathclyde University, won three prizes at the Medical Futures Innovations Awards, held in London last night (Tuesday).

They won the overall Dental and Health Innovations Award, the Best Diagnostic in Dental and Oral Health Award, and the NHS Technology Innovation Award.

The awards bring a package of business support to the team to further develop the project.

The team is currently testing the device and looking for funding to take it further.

Dr Christopher Longbottom, Professor John Girkin, Professor Nigel Pitts and Dr Simon Poland have used a miniature camera and tiny mirrors to produce images of teeth, but without the risks associated with X-rays – this is especially significant in treating children.

The Infrared Imaging system works by using infrared light to produce images of teeth, bones and gums similar to X-rays.

The team says it may have wider applications including, for example, measuring bone density. The competition judges said they were ‘highly impressed’ by the potential of the technology and hoped it would progress to proof of concept.

Andy Goldberg, founder of Medical Futures, said: ‘The potential of this technology is enormous and demonstrates the importance of collaboration between clinicians who know about unmet healthcare needs and scientists who have the skills to develop the technology to meet these needs.’

As well as the critical recognition and endorsement of an award, the team will receive a bespoke package of support to help turn ideas into viable propositions that appeal to investors.

The awards aim to overcome the challenge faced in the UK of being great at innovating but poor at getting ideas to the marketplace.

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Dentists flag up missed appointments^

NHS dentists in Sheffield are taking part in a campaign to raise awareness of the problems caused by missed appointments.

Each year, 54,000 appointments are missed at dental practices in the city, with the average practice having 600 missed appointments a year.

The campaign urges patients to ‘Keep it or cancel it – just don’t forget it’ in a bid to highlight the disruption caused when patients fail to attend.

It will involve displaying posters in surgeries, giving patients reminder stickers and using a chart to show the number of missed appointments and time wasted at practices each month.

Richard Taylor, dentist at Taylors Dental Care on Sharrow Vale Road, said: ‘As a Sheffield dentist, my colleagues and I are seriously concerned about the impact that patient non-attendance has on our workload.

‘If a patients fails to return for an hour appointment the dental team – dentist, nurse and receptionist – are totally redundant. If that’s not bad enough, the whole team will have to work an extra hour another day to enable the practice to reach their targets.’

In October, Taylors Dental Care had 37 missed appointments – amounting to more than 10 hours of the practice’s time.

All dental surgeries in Sheffield will receive a chart to display the number of missed appointments to help raise awareness of the problem to patients.

“In response to this, many dentists send a written reminder to patients, but if they repeat the non-attendance they may not be offered another appointment,” Richard added. “It’s important to remember that a missed appointment could have been used to see a young child with toothache.”

Dentists have reported that more patients are failing to attend their appointments since April 2006. This date saw the introduction of the new dental contract – making dentists unable to charge patients who miss appointments.

‘Failure to Attend’ resource packs will be distributed to all Sheffield dental practices in the coming weeks. The packs include: posters, reminder sticker sheets for patients and a chart for displaying the total number of missed appointments and time wasted for each month.

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Belgium whips up ‘tooth friendly’ chocolate^

Two Belgian chocolatiers have launched ‘tooth friendly’ chocolates using a new chocolate variety developed by a Swiss cocoa and chocolate supplier.

Belgian chocolate maker Daskalidès has launched chocolate bars with praliné filling, while peer Chocolaterie Smet has produced Hopla chocolate figurines.

Both companies have used chocolate supplied by Barry Callebaut that has been awarded the ‘happy tooth’ label by Toothfriendly International, a non-profit organisation dedicated to improving dental health.

‘We only give the Happy Tooth seal of approval to products that are guaranteed safe for teeth. All sweets that carry this logo have been scientifically tested by recognised and independent academic institutes for dental health. Their tests demonstrate that the product does not cause dental caries or tooth decay,’ Dr Albert Bär, director Toothfriendly International, explained.
 
Barry Callebaut said that the new tooth friendly chocolate has been developed using a special production process and unique ingredients.

For instance, milk proteins have replaced milk powder and isomaltulose, a natural sugar that can be found in small concentrations in honey and sugar cane, is used as a substitute for sugar.

Barry Callebaut said that consumer research revealed a high level of support for the tooth friendly chocolate from parents, with 73% stating that they felt the purchase of this chocolate to be ‘justified’.

Meanwhile, children also liked the taste, with 82% of 6- to 12-year-olds rating it as ‘delicious’ or ‘very delicious’.

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Dentist may have remedy to headaches^

Headaches, migraines, pain behind our eyes, sinus, and even neck and shoulder pain are all ailments that would warrant a trip to the doctors – that is until now.

As Rahul Doshi and Ashish B. Parmar, award-winning cosmetic dentist’s from Extreme Makeover and Partners at The Perfect Smile Studios & Academy in the South East, explain, it could well be your dentist who holds the key to your pain relief.

As the cosmetic dentistry specialists outline, pains such as headaches are often classic symptoms of poor dental occlusion – the way your teeth meet when your jaw bites together.

So, instead of popping paracetamol or visiting the GP, harmonising your teeth and jaw joints could affect more than just your smile.

A new trend for teeth whitening and tooth implants has resulted in an increased awareness in dental health, but this is still only half of the battle.

For a perfect smile and overall oral health, it is vital not to neglect the non-cosmetic elements.

To deal with these negative effects, the cosmetic dentistry specialists, at The Perfect Smile Studios have developed ‘Bite Right’ – a pioneering approach to detecting the numerous symptoms associated with inferior dental occlusion and probably the most comprehensive dental assessment available in the UK.

Through specialist assessment and the unique use of a Doppler Ultrasound machine to analyse jaw joints, the Perfect Smile Studios are able to efficiently diagnose problems with a patient’s jaw bite.

This results in the correction of many of the symptoms associated with misalignment of a bite, as well as establishing a good basis for long-term dental health.

If your jaw is found to be in the wrong position, your jaw muscles have to work harder to compensate, often causing muscle spasm. It is these spasms that can lead to continual headaches, sinus pain and aches in your neck and shoulders.

Dr. Ashish Parmar of the Perfect Smile Studios, said: ‘Problems with your jaw bite can result not only in referred pain such as headaches but also serious, long-term dental problems.’

Occlusal problems can cause tooth misalignment, breaks and fractures of teeth, gum problems, wearing down of teeth through grinding (particularly at night), toothaches with no obvious cause, teeth sensitivity and difficulties in opening and closing your mouth just to name a few. If undiagnosed, this can result in expensive on-going dental bills.

Dr Parmar added: ‘One of the major problems with incorrect occlusion is that the majority of people who suffer from it don’t know they are experiencing problems as a result of an incorrect bite, so it just continues to worsen. However, a ‘Bite Right’ examination by The Perfect Smile Studios can detect the symptoms of poor occlusion and effectively implement changes to correct the problem.”

Dr Parmar, added, “Assessing the facial muscles, jaw joints and bite pattern of the teeth allows us to offer treatment that improves the overall dental health and wellbeing of a person”.

For further information on The Perfect Smile Studios visit: www.theperfectsmile.co.uk.

^1228262400^1614^Dentist may have remedy to headache…^Headaches, migraines, pain behind our eyes, sinus, and even neck and shoulder pain are all ailments that would warrant a trip to the doctors…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/headache.png
Dirty teeth reveal ancient diet^

Researchers in Peru are getting a more detailed understanding of what people ate thousands of years ago in, thanks to poor dental hygiene.

Dental plaque – scraped from the teeth of people who lived as much as 9,200 years ago – revealed traces of cultivated crops, according to a recent report.

The crops these ancient people ate included squash and beans, peanuts and a local tree-borne fruit known as pacay, according to experts at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the National Museum of Natural History, and Vanderbilt University.

They studied 39 teeth from six to eight individuals.

Found in northern Peru’s Nanchoc Valley, the teeth were uncovered in the remains of round house structures in a settlement dated to 9,200 to 5,500 years ago.

^1228262400^1615^Dirty teeth reveal ancient diet^Researchers in Peru are getting a more detailed understanding of what people ate thousands of years ago in, thanks to poor dental hygiene.De…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/squash.png
Belgium whips up ‘tooth friendly’ chocolate^

Two Belgian chocolatiers have launched ‘tooth friendly’ chocolates using a new chocolate variety developed by a Swiss cocoa and chocolate supplier.

Belgian chocolate maker Daskalidès has launched chocolate bars with praliné filling, while peer Chocolaterie Smet has produced Hopla chocolate figurines.

Both companies have used chocolate supplied by Barry Callebaut that has been awarded the ‘happy tooth’ label by Toothfriendly International, a non-profit organisation dedicated to improving dental health.

‘We only give the Happy Tooth seal of approval to products that are guaranteed safe for teeth. All sweets that carry this logo have been scientifically tested by recognised and independent academic institutes for dental health. Their tests demonstrate that the product does not cause dental caries or tooth decay,’ Dr Albert Bär, director Toothfriendly International, explained.
 
Barry Callebaut said that the new tooth friendly chocolate has been developed using a special production process and unique ingredients.

For instance, milk proteins have replaced milk powder and isomaltulose, a natural sugar that can be found in small concentrations in honey and sugar cane, is used as a substitute for sugar.

Barry Callebaut said that consumer research revealed a high level of support for the tooth friendly chocolate from parents, with 73% stating that they felt the purchase of this chocolate to be ‘justified’.

Meanwhile, children also liked the taste, with 82% of 6- to 12-year-olds rating it as ‘delicious’ or ‘very delicious’.

^1228262400^1618^Belgium whips up ‘tooth friendly^Two Belgian chocolatiers have launched ‘tooth friendly’ chocolates using a new chocolate variety developed by a Swiss cocoa and …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Happy_Tooth.png
£85,000 ortho grants up for grabs^

Orthodontic research in 2009 is to get a boost, thanks to £85,000 worth of research funding.

The British Orthodontic Society Foundation (BOSF) is offering the cash as part of its support for research and educational projects and personal research fellowships.

Last year, BOSF made a record award – £97,296 for the project, ‘A Longitudinal Study of Orthognathic Patients’ Self-perception, Motivation and Expectations in Relation to Outcomes’ and a further £32,534 to a project examining ‘The Possible Role of Chewing Gum in Orthodontic Pain Relief’.

Applications for support from the British Orthodontic Society Foundation are invited and in line with its aims, the Society is encouraging applicants to consider projects that will benefit the orthodontic speciality.

Collaborative research between groups and organisations are especially encouraged.

Applications must be received electronically by noon on 16 January 2009 and the awards guidelines and an application form are available on www.bos.org.uk.

The Foundation is funded from donations and legacies from orthodontists and the BOS ensures that 100% of the monies raised are put into supporting research and educational projects and personal research fellowships.

For more information about the work of the British Orthodontic Society Foundation visit www.bos.org.uk.

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A Euro guide for dentists^

A brand new comprehensive guide for dentists wanting to practise in other EU member states is now available.

The Council of European Dentists (CED) has just published a comprehensive guide on the training and work requirements for dentists and other dental professionals.

The latest edition of the EU Manual of Dental Practice describes the legal and ethical regulations, dental training requirements, oral health systems and the organisation of dental practice in 32 European (EU and EEA) countries, including Croatia, which is due to join the EU next year.

The practising arrangements, the regulatory frameworks and systems within which dentists work in the respective countries are compared. There is also country specific information on the dental specialities that are recognised, along with details of where such training is available and duration.

The guide also contains information on other dental care professionals, with a list of those that are recognised, their training, the procedures they are allowed to carry out, and the rules within which they can legally practise.

Commenting on the new guide, the main author of the manual, Dr Anthony Kravitz said: ‘There has been considerable interest from dentists and government officials about the organisation of dentistry in the EU and we believe this guide addresses all the professional issues that dentists need to take on board to make the move to practise in another country as hassle-free as possible.’

^1228348800^1620^A Euro guide for dentists^A brand new comprehensive guide for dentists wanting to practise in other EU member states is now available.The Council of European Dentists…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/euro-box.png
Dentistry Awards – an Olympian success^

The 2008 Dentistry Awards scored a hat-trick this year as it proved – for the third year running – to be a resounding success.

Now considered one of the biggest events on the dental calendar, it attracted more than 500 people from the UK dental world.

The Athena in Leicester was the venue for a splendid evening of wining and dining before the ceremony itself, presented by Olympic athlete-turned-television-personality Kriss Akabusi.

Many practices across the UK were on tenterhooks throughout the evening before the winners were revealed from the shortlisted entries.

The Awards had a unique format with the UK being divided into nine regions to recognise outstanding young individuals, teams and practices.

There were three awards (Best Young Dentist, Best Team, Best Practice) for each region, as well as an overall UK winner in each category. Nominations for the awards were collated earlier in the year, with a select panel of judges finalising the shortlist and winners ahead of the evening itself.

Kate Magee, business development executive for organisers FMC Professional, said: ‘This year’s Dentistry Awards ceremony was a fabulous triumph – Kriss Akabusi’s energy and enthusiasm was fantastic and all of our winners really enjoyed receiving a hug from him as they made their was onto the stage to receive their award!

‘The theming of the venue and the Cirque de Lumiere entertainment was trully stunning making the celebrations completely magical and everyone had an amazing time celebrating their success.

‘Next year will be even bigger and better and we are all look forward to the launch in April.’

To pre register for an entry form, contact Elisa on 01923 851734.

There will be full coverage and pictures from the fantastic evening in the 16 January issue of Dentistry magazine.

To purchase your copies of photos from the night, visit http://www.fmc.co.uk/store.

The winners in full were:
Scotland
Best Young Dentist
Winner: Mike Gow – The Berkeley Clinic
Runner Up: Philip Friel – Hyndland Dental Centre

Best Team
Winner: The Gentle Touch
Runner up: Fergus & Glover

Best Practice
Winner: Fergus & Glover
Runner up: Stafford Street Dental Care

Northern Ireland
Best Young Dentist
Winner: Philip McLorinan – Dunmurry Dental Practice
Runner up: David Nelson  – Bangor West Dental & Implant Clinic

Best Team
Winner: Dunmurry Dental Practice
Runner Up: Bangor West Dental & Implant Clinic

Best Practice
Winner: Dunmurry Dental Practice
Runner up: Comber Dental Practice

North West
Best Young Dentist
Winner: Kailesh Solanki – Kiss Dental

Best Team
Winner: Cahill Dental Care Centre

Best Practice
Winner: Liverpool Implant & Aesthetic Dental Spa
Runner up: Tracey Bell

North East
Best Young Dentist
Winner: Dave Thomas – Thompson & Thomas

Best Team
Winner: Woodseats Dental Care
Runner Up: Thompson & Thomas

Best Practice
Winner:  Dental Healthcare Centre
Runner Up: Genix Healthcare Dental Clinic – Middlesbrough

The Midlands
Best Young Dentist
Winner: Kalpesh Bohara – The Dental Suite
Runner up: Saaqib Ali – Sherwood Dental Practice

Best Team
Winner: The Priors Dental Practice

Best Practice
Winner: Sherwood Dental Practice
Runner up: The Priors Dental Practice

East
Best Young Dentist
Winner: Stephen Pitt – The Dental Studio

Best Team
Winner: The Smile Boutique

Best Practice
Winner: Smile and Wellbeing

London
Best Young Dentist
Winner: Lydia Pink – Blackheath Village Dental Practice

Best Team
Winner: Sparkle Dental Boutique

Best Practice
Winner: Sparkle Dental Boutique
Runner Up: Metrodental

South West & Wales
Best Young Dentist
Steven Hinchliffe – Weston Aesthetic Dental Centre

Best Team
Winner: The Smile Suite

Best Practice
Winner: Bath & Bristol Periodontal Clinic
Runner up: The Smile Suite

South East
Best Young Dentist
Winner: Komal Suri – Smile Design

Best Team
Winner: Aesthetics
Runner up: Haslemere Dental Centre

Best Practice
Winner: Rosebank Dental Practice

Dentistry.co.uk Best UK website
Winner: Dereham Dental Health
Runner Up: Queens Park Dental Team

UK Outstanding Achievement
Winner: Edward John Crouch – Sherwood Dental Practice
Runner up: Sarah Glover – Birdgate Dental Practice

BEST UK YOUNG DENTIST

Winner: Mike Gow – The Berkely Clinic (Scotland)

BEST UK TEAM
Sparkle Dental Boutique (London)

BEST UK PRACTICE

The Dental Healthcare Centre (North East)

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Fluorescence detects mercury in amalgam^

US scientists have developed a simple and quick method for detecting mercury in fish and dental samples.

The technique – thought up by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh – involves a fluorescent substance that glows bright green when it comes into contact with oxidised mercury.

The intensity of the glow indicates the amount of mercury present.

Developed in the laboratory of Kazunori Koide, a chemistry professor in Pitt’s School of Arts and Sciences, the new method can be used onsite and can detect mercury in 30 to 60 minutes for dental fillings (or amalgams) or 10 to 30 minutes for fish.

Koide explained: ‘Our method could be used in the fish market or the dentist office. We have developed a reliable indicator for mercury that a person could easily and safely use at home.’

The fluorescence results from the reaction of mercury ions with hydrocarbons called alkynes – the alkyne is converted into a ketone and creates a fluorescent molecule.

Koide’s method differs from similar mercury indicators in that it withstands the oxidation process mercury samples must undergo prior to testing.

The mercury species found in most fish and dental amalgams – such as the toxic methyl mercury – must be converted into a safer variety of mercury with an oxidising agent.

Other fluorescent detectors are often not compatible with samples that have been oxidised.

In terms of amalgam disposal, Koide suggested that his method could be used to test dentist office wastewater for mercury content onsite without sending samples to analytical laboratories.

The researchers’ report is in the current online edition of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

^1228348800^1622^Fluorescence detects mercury in ama…^US scientists have developed a simple and quick method for detecting mercury in fish and dental samples.The technique – thought up by …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/mercury.png
Scotland scours the world for dentists^

Scotland’s health boss was today urged to tackle the North-east’s dental crisis by recruiting dentists from overseas, according to www.eveningexpress.co.uk.

With just 38% of people having access to a dentist in the NHS Grampian area, Health Minister Nicola Sturgeon is under pressure to deliver a dramatic improvement.

One of the SNP’s flagship election promises that saw the party sweep to power at Holyrood last year was to improve dental care.

But despite opening Aberdeen Dental School – to provide 20 dentists every year – it is thought that up to 26,000 people are still waiting for NHS dental care in the North-east.

With more dentists opting to set-up private practices instead of doing NHS work, there have been calls to look elsewhere.

Aberdeen North SNP MSP Brian Adam has lodged a question in the Scottish Parliament asking what progress has been made to recruit foreign dentists.

Mr Adam said: ‘There is a big disparity in terms of who has access to an NHS dentist. There are just 38% of people in the North-east who do, but in Glasgow the figure is about 70%.

‘I’m suggesting as part of the solution if we can’t recruit NHS dentists here we should look elsewhere.’

A spokesman for Ms Sturgeon said they have taken urgent steps to increase dental provision in the North-east.

He said: ‘Significant resources have also been invested in dental provision in the North-east, as well as the dental schools.’

An NHS Grampian spokesman said: ‘We fully support the recruitment of overseas dentists. NHS Grampian currently employs eight Polish dentists who are very professional and have settled in well in Scotland.’

Mr Adam’s question to the minister is due to be answered on 12 December.

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DENTISTRY DEBATES PART 1^

Key opinion leaders including Eddie Crouch discuss issues affecting the profession. The BDTA Dental Showcase 2008 saw the birth of Dentistry Debates. Dentistry magazine’s Tom Roberts reports.
Part 1:


^1228348800^1623^DENTISTRY DEBATES PART 1^Key opinion leaders including Eddie Crouch discuss issues affecting the profession. The BDTA Dental Showcase 2008 saw the birth of Dentistry…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/eddiecrouch.jpg
The mouth speaks volumes when talking health^

US researchers say doctors can use a patient’s oral health history to screen for a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Experts at Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital say patients with a history of periodontal disease were more likely to have increased levels of inflammation – a risk factor for heart disease.

The report, published online in the American Journal of Cardiology, said the group may not be detected by traditional cardiovascular risk screening.

John T Grbic, professor of clinical dental medicine at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, said that many people do not realise how oral health is often a predictor of one’s overall health and that symptoms for many life-threatening illnesses – such as diabetes and heart disease – first appear in the mouth.

He added: ‘For this reason, it’s vitally important for people to have routine dental check-ups and have an ongoing dialogue with their dentist about their oral health.’

^1228435200^1625^The mouth speaks volumes when talki…^US researchers say doctors can use a patient’s oral health history to screen for a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.Experts at Columbia…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/heart-health.png
New GDC members appointed ^

The GDC has appointed a new group of members to its independent Appointments Committee, responsible for maintaining the high quality of those judging dental professionals’ fitness to practise.

The Appointments Committee’s role is to oversee the training and performance of the GDC’s independent Fitness to Practise Panel, made up of 76 members, and recruit new members as required.

In the future it will also be responsible for recommending members for the Council’s Investigating Committee, which considers allegations of impaired fitness to practise and decides whether a case should be referred to one of the Practice Committees.

The new membership of the Appointments Committee is: Sally Irvine (Chair), Nicola Billot (registrant), Jeanne Goulding (lay), John Hunt (registrant), Ray McAndrew (registrant), Marcia Roberts (lay) and James Walker (lay).

The Appointments Committee is integral to making sure that the Interim Orders Committee and all three of the GDC’s practice committees (Professional Conduct Committee,

Professional Performance Committee and Health Committee) continue to work to the highest standard and remain independent.

Sally Irvine, the new Chair of the Appointments Committee, is currently a member of Council and will be resigning before she takes up her appointment.

She said: ‘All those joining the new Committee bring a wealth of invaluable experience from a variety of sectors, and I look forward to working with them to ensure that the GDC’s high standards continue to be met.’

The GDC’s chief executive Duncan Rudkin said: ‘The Council has selected these new members from a field of exceptional quality candidates, following a widely publicised recruitment campaign and a selection process in line with contemporary good practice.

‘I know that the Council is grateful to the new members for taking up this challenge, and to the outgoing members of the Committee who have served with distinction for the last six years.”

The new Appointments Committee will take office on 1 January 2009.

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Halley’s cosmetic rising^

Dr Elaine Halley is the new president of the British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (BACD).

Elaine serves on the editorial board for Dentistry’s sister magazines – Private Dentistry and Aesthetic Dentistry Today – and is the principal of Cherrybank Dental Spa, a private practice in Perth, Scotland.

Her primary interest is cosmetic and advanced restorative dentistry and she’s studied extensively in the US, Europe as well as the UK.

Dr Halley has been recognised internationally as one of the top cosmetic dentists featuring in several magazines and articles.

She qualified from the University of Edinburgh in 1992 and her and her team are the first of only seven dentists worldwide to graduate from the Master’s Course in cosmetic dentistry at the Rosenthal Institute at the New York University College of Dentistry.

^1228780800^1626^Halley’s cosmetic rising^Dr Elaine Halley is the new president of the British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (BACD).Elaine serves on the editorial board for Dentistry…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/halley.png
BDA welcomes dentistry review as a ‘step forward’ ^

The BDA has greeted today’s (Friday) announcement that the Department of Health has commissioned an independent review of NHS dentistry as a step forward in addressing the significant problems facing NHS dentists and patients.

The review was announced by Secretary of State for Health, Alan Johnson.
 
Responding to the announcement, BDA Executive Board Chair Susie Sanderson said: ‘The BDA is pleased to see the long overdue announcement of a review of NHS dentistry in England.

‘The announcement recognises the significant problems patients and dentists face, and places the Department of Health on a path to addressing those problems.
 
‘The group will need to think carefully about the challenges NHS dentistry faces, tackling the issues identified by the Health Select Committee, the profession and patient groups, and striving for the real changes necessary to achieve the goals set out for it.’

^1229040000^1630^BDA welcomes dentistry review as a…^The BDA has greeted today’s (Friday) announcement that the Department of Health has commissioned an independent review of NHS dentistr…^
Top teeth-care tips for Christmas^

Festive revellers overdosing on Christmas cake, chocolate, crisps and champagne, face possible tooth decay because of the high sugar content in such party favourites, www.dailyrecord.co.uk reports.

The festive season is a time when people eat more sugar – and more frequently – than at any other time of the year, and that can cause serious problems for teeth unless sensible and straightforward steps are taken.

The warning comes from leading Glasgow dentist, Dr Ambigai Jeyabalan, who said there are a number of ways to counteract the potential impact of excess sugar intake.

‘The continuous sugar dosage over the festive period means teeth are under constant attack because saliva doesn’t get a chance to do its job properly,’ said Dr Ambi, who owns the Kalyani Dental Lounge and Pomegranate Gallery in Bath Street.

‘Outwith this party season, our teeth usually get time to recover after eating sugary or acidic food and drinks as we can brush an hour later.

‘That’s because, by this time, our mouth reaches its neutral ph level thanks to our saliva. That doesn’t happen at party time.’

But Dr Ambi said that there was no need for people to become party poopers or miss out on a good time as there are simple measures that can be taken to protect teeth.

She said: ‘Avoid fizzy drinks and diet and fruit juices which are very acidic and cause tooth erosion.

‘Sticking to safe snacks such as breadsticks, crackers, cheese and dried fruits can help greatly. And, obviously, brushing your teeth before going to bed is crucial.’

She also has advice for the morning after the night before.

She said: ‘I know this might sound awful but if you’re sick the next morning, you shouldn’t brush your teeth immediately.

‘The vomit is highly acidic and attacks the teeth so if you brush straight away, you brush away the protective enamel on the teeth, which has been weakened by acid.

‘Using a fluoride, alcohol free, mouthwash is a better option to avoid possible acid erosion.

‘Also, if you have an accident which involves your mouth, then it’s best to seek the advice of a dentist immediately.

‘Leaving it longer could create a bigger problem.’

Dr Ambi believes her advice can help people, and their teeth survive the party season.

‘I am no killjoy, but looking after your teeth can often be forgotten during a prolonged period of festivities, she added.

Dr Ambi’s top tips include:

• Keeping a spare toothbrush and toothpaste at work or carry one around or, if that isn’t possible, then keep a travel size fluoride mouthwash (preferably alcohol free) handy;
• Don’t brush your teeth straight after having sugary/acidic foods or drinks, the mouth takes one hour to reach a neutral ph – this is when it is safe to brush
• Chew sugar-free gum throughout the day or evening to speed up the process of the mouth reaching a neutral ph
• Carry sugar free mints to keep breath fresh
• Don’t drink bubbly champagne or sparkling drinks for long periods of time – stick to still drinks using a straw for fizzy drinks
• Avoid sweet and sticky snacks – even most crisps have sugar
• Don’t snack all the time – have one-hour breaks between nibbles
• Pick safe snacks like breadsticks, crackers, cheese and dried fruits
• Always brush teeth before going to bed

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