Dental nurses ‘appalled’ at fees increase

The British Association of Dental Nurses (BADN) has reacted strongly to news that the General Dental Council (GDC) is increasing the annual registration fee for dental nurses.

The fee will rise to £120 from July 2011.
 
BADN President Sue Bruckel says: ‘I am appalled that the GDC could be so insensitive to the position of dental nurses that they have actually voted to raise the ARF for dental nurses to £120 – an amount beyond the means of the majority of dental nurses.’
 
A recent BADN survey showed that the majority of dental nurses in the UK earn £15,000 or less a year.

Sue adds: ‘To expect them to pay £120 merely to have the right to practise their profession is unreasonable and unacceptable. Dental nurses – the lowest paid members of the dental team – should not be penalised for the GDC’s current financial difficulties.
 
She continues: ‘GDC President Alison Lockyer has stated that the GDC is committed to “delivering value for money” for registrants.

‘How is £120 for no benefit other than the right to practise one’s profession “value for money? The BADN is calling upon the GDC to make available to all registrants full details of exactly how they are planning to save money in 2010-2011.

‘Are they, for example, taking steps to curtail the cost of travelling expenses for GDC members by ensuring that all travel is done at the most economical rates?  Why are GDC members still being paid more than £350 for attending meetings?’

She concludes: ‘In the meantime, the BADN will be consulting with members on its position regarding registration and future action.’

^1286323200^3250^Dental nurses ‘appalled’ at fees in…^The British Association of Dental Nurses (BADN) has reacted strongly to news that the General Dental Council (GDC) is increasing the annual …^
Prepare for winter chaos, dentists warned ^

A business support organisation is urging small firms, including dental practices, to ensure they prepare for weather-related disruptions this winter by drawing up continuity plans.
 
Following the coldest winter for three decades last year, which caused widespread disruption to businesses, forecasters are predicting another harsh, snow-filled winter in the coming months.
 
Positive Weather Solutions this week said that the winter of 2010/11 was likely to see similarly icy temperatures to last year and more of the ‘disruptive snowfall’ which hampered deliveries, triggered heating and power failures and left many employees unable to get into work.
 
According to a YouGov poll, 58% of senior decision-makers at small businesses said their companies suffered as a result of the snow last winter, despite 78% believing their firms were sufficiently prepared.
 
And nationally, three quarters (74%) of employees were affected by the snow, with more than a quarter (26%) failing to get in to work at all.

Crucially, 21% of those surveyed found key suppliers and contacts were unavailable and 26% had to postpone or cancel meetings.
 
As a result, the Forum of Private Business is urging smaller companies to prepare for any potential adverse weather now by putting in place business continuity plans.
 
Spokesman Phil McCabe said: ‘I think it’s fair to say that last winter’s extreme weather conditions caught out many small business owners.
 
‘A lot of small firms struggled to continue trading as employees failed to make it into work, deliveries were cancelled and freezing temperatures caused heating equipment to fail, leaving their premises unusable.
 
‘We estimated that last winter’s snowfalls were costing smaller businesses across the UK around £230 million each day at one point. Obviously, in the current climate, small firms can ill afford a similar expenditure this year so we’re urging business owners to think about their contingency plans now to ensure they aren’t put out of action by another icy winter.’
 
The Forum is also arguing that smaller firms should consider investing in expert support services to ensure they can continue trading when their premises are hit by extreme weather conditions.
 
The Forum, which is a not-for-profit organisation, has launched a new business continuity service for its members in an effort to protect them against business ‘disasters’ such as snow-related problems or floods, burglaries, fires and power cuts.
 
While small businesses will usually get an insurance payout to cover damage to their property after such an event, they are highly vulnerable to the steep drop in turnover which often follows as customer records are lost, phone calls and emails go unanswered and clients take their custom elsewhere.
 
However, the Forum’s new service will ensure its members can continue trading through such potentially crippling problems. The AssistPoint service, which is designed especially for small and medium-sized companies, starts at just £240 (+VAT) per year.
 
In the event of a disaster, AssistPoint would give a smaller business:
• The ability to answer phones and make calls, providing reassurance to customers and suppliers
• A ready-made workplace with computers, print, email and fax facilities
• Systems and processes in place in order to continue to trade uninterrupted
• Access to 5GB of data backed up on a PC.
 
AssistPoint is being provided through a deal between the Forum and partner organisation Smartways Technology – a leading IT managed services provider. Thanks to preferential rates, Forum members can access discounts of up to £450 on Smartways’ services.
 
In the event of a major problem, all AssistPoint services are guaranteed to be delivered within one working day and can be activated with a single phone call.
 
• A Populus poll recently commissioned by the British Insurance Brokers’ Association found around half of SMEs believed it would take less than a day for a serious disruption or disaster to have a significant impact on their business.
 
According to Environment Agency figures, around 185,000 commercial properties are at risk of flooding in England and Wales. The average loss to a business from a flood is thought to be around £25,000, compared to £1,000 for a burglary. The floods in the summer of 2007 affected more than 9,000 businesses, with the costs to each business ranging from around £75,000 to £112,000.

^1286323200^3251^Prepare for winter chaos, dentists …^A business support organisation is urging small firms, including dental practices, to ensure they prepare for weather-related disruptions th…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/snow-street.png
Doubt cast over accuracy of income data^^1286323200^3252^Doubt cast over accuracy of income …^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/chart.jpg
Individual and award-winning practices beautifully created ^

At DDPC, we believe that designing your dental practice has the potential to be one of life’s most rewarding investments and that creating a beautiful environment should be an enjoyable and stressfree experience. 
 
DDPC’s award winning and professional team delivers the complete solution to a refurbishment, relocation or practice start-up, managing every detail from the initial consultation through to design and contract administration against a fixed budget.

 /></p>
<p>
<p><em><strong>Toothbeary practice in Richmond, west London</strong></em></p>
<p>
<p>Call us for free advice or to set up an appointment.<br /> <br /><strong>Services</strong><br />Surveys | Feasibility Studies | Concept Design | Statutory Approvals | Detailed Construction Drawings | Interior Design | Furniture Sourcing | Tendering | Contract Administration.<br /> </p>
<p>Dental Design & Planning Consultants are at Walsingham house, 2nd Floor, 1331 High Road, Whetstone, London, N20 9HR <br />Tel: +44 (0) 208 446 9946<br />Fax: +44 (0) 208 446 9916<br />Email: info@ddpc.co.uk<br />Website: <a href=http://www.ddpc.co.uk>www.ddpc.co.uk</a></p>
<p>^1286409600^3255^ Individual and award-winning pract…^At DDPC, we believe that designing your dental practice has the potential to be one of life’s most rewarding investments and that crea…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Toothbeary-012.png<br />
Dentists call for cutbacks to be evaluated^^1286409600^3253^Dentists call for cutbacks to be ev…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/health-magnifying-glass.jpg<br />
Drug rebuilds bone lost with gum disease^
<p>A drug marketed to grow bone in osteoporosis patients may also work to heal bone wounds in gum disease patients, a study suggests. <br /> <br />The drug is teriparatide and is marketed by Eli Lilly and Co under the trade name Forteo, which is a type of parathyroid hormone and the only anabolic (bone-growing) osteoporosis drug approved on the market in the US.<br /> <br />Last year, women taking bisphosphonates to protect their bones from osteoporosis were warned that they could be at risk of serious jaw damage.<br /> <br />A study by the University of Southern California School of Dentistry suggested that as many as one in 25 users were at risk of osteoncrosis of the jaw.<br /> <br />But Jill Bashutski, clinical assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry and first author on the study, says of this latest development: ‘This new approach for the treatment of periodontal disease could allow us to rebuild some of the bone that is lost due to periodontal disease, which until this point has been very difficult to achieve.<br /> <br />‘Current treatments to re-grow bone around teeth affected with gum disease have limited success rates.’<br /> <br />The study, ‘Teriparatide and Osseous Regeneration in the Oral Cavity’ appears online in the <em>New England Journal of Medicine</em>. <br /> <br />It took place at the School of Dentistry’s Michigan Center for Oral Health Research, where patients with severe chronic gum disease received the traditional treatment for gum disease, which is periodontal surgery on one-quarter of the mouth. <br /> <br />Half of the patients took a six-week course of teriparatide by injection into the skin over the abdomen or stomach, plus calcium and vitamin D supplements, while the other half received a placebo.<br /> <br />After one year, researchers saw a 29% improvement in bone-level measurements on X-rays in the teriparatide group, versus a 3% improvement in the placebo group, a 10-fold increase.<br /> <br />Laurie McCauley, U-M professor and chair of periodontics and oral medicine, and principal investigator on the study, adds: ‘I think one really interesting aspect of this study is that even a short dosing of this drug had benefits that lasted a year.’ <br /> <br />Forteo is not FDA approved for uses other than osteoporosis, but another possible application could be to help grow bone around dental implants.</p>
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Dental practice is Perfect for training^
<p>A dental practice has been honoured with two prestigious National Training Awards in recognition of its outstanding contribution and commitment to training, learning and development in the workplace. </p>
<p>Perfect 32 was presented with a Regional National Training Award and a UK National Training Award at the Yorkshire and The Humber Regional Ceremony, held at Leeds Town Hall.</p>
<p>
<p>The practice was recognised in the Yorkshire and Humber Training Award-Small Employer category and the UK National Training Award-Small Employer category for furthering our professional development across many areas of expertise, including management, customer service and clinical excellence.</p>
<p>Run on behalf of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) by UK Skills, the National Training Awards inspires and encourages UK industry to invest in training and development as a route to achieving outstanding organisational and individual success.</p>
<p>
<p>Winning an award is recognition of best practice and provides a benchmark for standards of excellence in training in the UK.</p>
<p>
<p>City & Guilds is the premier sponsor of the 2010 National Training Awards.</p>
<p>Perfect 32 will now be invited to the National Training Awards 2010 UK Ceremony, being held in London on Wednesday 1 December.</p>
<p>
<p>At the ceremony, UK winners will find out if they have won the overall Winner of the Year Award for their category.</p>
<p>
<p>They will be up against all the other UK winners from across Britain in competition for these top awards.</p>
<p>Perfect 32’s practice manager, Nicki Rowland, says: ‘We are absolutely delighted to win not one, but two National Training Awards and I am immensely proud of my team, who have worked so hard for this. <br /> <br />‘Each team member is currently studying or has recently completed a course and this willingness to learn reflects their enthusiasm to develop and provide the best possible service to our patients.</p>
<p>
<p>‘We invest considerable time and resources into training and furthering our professional development and to be honoured in this way makes all the studying worthwhile.’</p>
<p>
<p>Simon Bartley, chief executive of UK Skills which manages the National Training Awards said: ‘I would like to offer congratulations to all regional and UK winners for the National Training Awards 2010. Achieving an award is a fantastic achievement and one that all winners should be really proud of.</p>
<p>‘Now more than ever it is essential for organisations to continue to invest in the development of their staff. The UK’s future, after all, can only be strengthened and sustained by people who have the skills needed to meet the demands of today’s globalised economy.’</p>
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Good design matters^
<p>A well-formulated and constructed design will add significant value to your business.</p>
<p>
<p>From a marketing perspective, it is a recruitment tool – attracting the right patients and staff.</p>
<p>
<p><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/GMC_5840_1.png alt=

From a commercial outlook, a well-designed workplace is more streamlined, productive and motivating.
 
Whether you are planning a refurbishment, relocation or starting up from scratch give DDPC a call for free advice or to set up an appointment.
 
Services
Surveys | Feasibility Studies | Concept Design | Statutory Approvals | Detailed Construction Drawings | Interior Design | Furniture Sourcing | Tendering | Contract Administration.
 
Dental Design & Planning Consultants are at:

Walsingham house, 2nd Floor, 1331 High Road, Whetstone, London, N20 9HR
Tel: +44 (0) 208 446 9946
Fax: +44 (0) 208 446 9916
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.ddpc.co.uk

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Restoring implants for the GDP^

Minesh Patel will be running a one-day course for GDPs on restoring implants in association with BioHorizons.

This London-based course will be an essential introduction for all GDPs currently placing implants and who would like practical and theoretical training on the key issues around restoration. 

The course will cover occlusion, patient expectations, anatomy, aesthetics and gingival assessment, with additional guidance from Dr Patel on which prosthetic solution to use and when.

The day will conclude with a discussion around the treatment and resolutions of prosthetic complications.

This highly valuable course will be held at UCL Eastman CPD, 123 Gray’s Inn Road, London on 27 November 2010.

CPD will be credited by BioHorizons and the course is competitively priced at £250.

For more information or to book your place contact BioHorizons now on 01344 752560 or [email protected] or visit www.biohorizons.com.

^1286409600^3256^Restoring implants for the GDP^Minesh Patel will be running a one-day course for GDPs on restoring implants in association with BioHorizons.This London-based course will b…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/bio.png
UK mouthwash launch is breath of fresh air ^

A unique anti-halitosis mouthwash – already a huge success during recent years in Scandinavia – is to be launched onto the UK market at the BDTA Dental Showcase 2010.

The event will feature the mouthwash, CB12, on stand B15 where it will be available to dental professionals for trial.

Following the launch, CB12 will be available to dentists through an online shop, for the first six months this will be exclusively for Denplan dentists.

Members of the general public will be directed to their nearest dentist stockist.

CB12, which is marketed in Scandinavia as SB12, has a unique patented composition that actively neutralises the volatile sulphur compounds that cause bad breath, achieving effective 12 hour relief from the symptoms.

Clinical comparison studies recently carried out by the Microbiology Unit at West of England University, Bristol, have proved that the combination of low concentrates of zinc acetate and chlorhexidine in the product provide ‘a consistent and reproducible inhibitory effect on oral malodour parameters, which in turn correlate well with each other’.

The product came out top when tested against four commercially available mouthwashes.

CB12 was developed by Dr Thomas Norlin D.D.S.Odont.Lic who began his research work on the product after becoming frustrated by mouthwash solutions that relied on strong smells and flavourings to disguise bad breath but failed to neutralise it.

He says: ‘Unlike a lot of other products, CB12 works by chemically binding itself to tissues in the oral cavity and neutralising and preventing the production of the VSCs that cause bad breath.

‘The product can be used by anyone over eight years of age and a single dose remains effective in keeping the breath fresh for 12 hours.’

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Power toothbrush backed by science^

A power toothbrush has been given the official stamp of approval by a dental health body.

Oral-B’s oscillating-rotating power toothbrush has been recognised by the British Dental Health Foundation’s scientific panel as an effective way of reducing plaque.

The Foundation only accredits consumer products once it has checked the manufacturers claims are clinically sound.

The accreditation is undertaken by a panel of independent, international experts.

Oral-B power toothbrushes are the most used and recommended brand by dental professionals and are the only adult power brushes accredited by the British Dental Health Foundation.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, says: ‘The range of powerbrushes from Oral-B have been shown to effectively and efficiently reduce plaque, their claims are 100% accurate and that is why we have added them to our elite list of accredited dental products.   

‘With various studies suggesting causal links between oral hygiene and cardiovascular disease, diabetes and pre-term births, brushing our teeth in the correct way has become essential, not only to our oral health but also our overall health.’

^1286496000^3259^Power toothbrush backed by science^A power toothbrush has been given the official stamp of approval by a dental health body.Oral-B’s oscillating-rotating power toothbrush has…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Accred.png
BDPMA social meeting at Dental Showcase^

BDPMA members are invited to join Seema Sharma (of Slumdog Secret Millionaire fame) and members of the BDPMA team for drinks and canapés at Seema’s Docklands practice after the BDTA Dental Showcase on Friday 15 October.

This is an excellent opportunity for BDPMA members to meet in a relaxed atmosphere after a tiring day at ExCeL.

No tickets are required but to give her an idea of numbers, if you expect to attend please send an email to Seema Sharma at [email protected]

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Engagement must fill in White Paper gaps^

NHS reforms will only succeed for dentistry if there is significant engagement with the profession as the many gaps in the proposals are filled in.

That’s the verdict of the British Dental Association (BDA) in its response to the White Paper Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS.

It sees the BDA stress the value of both clinical leadership and local input.
 
The BDA responds positively to the suggestion that responsibility for commissioning primary dental care services be transferred from primary care trusts to a new national commissioning board.

The recent indication that Professor Jimmy Steele, author of an independent review of NHS dental services in England published last year, will continue to help shape new contractual arrangements for dentistry is also given a thumbs-up.
 
Concerns are raised about the lack of detail in the White Paper though, pointing to gaps in the proposals for both general dental practice and to questions about salaried and secondary care.

The BDA argues that salaried primary dental care services must also be commissioned by the national commissioning board with appropriate local input.
 
It also expresses anxieties about the transitional arrangements for dentistry.

Local skills and expertise, the understanding of populations’ needs and the way that dentistry can meet them must not be lost in a period of structural uncertainty for many NHS employees. The BDA response also demands that the costs of NHS reconfiguration are transparent and that a budget is set aside for it so that patient care and front-line services do not suffer.
 
Dr Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA’s Executive Board, said: ‘There are some interesting elements in the White Paper for NHS dentistry in England. The indication of new contractual arrangements and the centralisation of commissioning give an opportunity to improve NHS dental service for patients and dentists.

‘Clearly though, there are some significant risks with the envisaged scale and pace of change. The immediate threat is that the period of transition we are entering will see expertise flood out of the NHS and we may already be seeing the beginning of a brain drain.

‘The local dental expertise of Consultants in Dental Public Health, Dental Practice Advisers and Local Dental Committees is clearly very important and must be maintained during the transition period and in the new arrangements.
 
‘We also see some quite significant gaps in the proposals. Engagement with the profession will be crucial as the detail is developed.’
 
The BDA response includes a number of further recommendations including the development of a strategy for dental information technology.

It is available here.

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Do it like Delia^

Families should have the choice to buy frozen fruit and veg for a Healthy Start

‘Cheating’ in the kitchen to make healthy dinners is no longer a sin, thanks to celebrity chefs like Delia Smith, who have recently come out of the closet in their use of frozen fruit and vegetables in cooking.

Frozen fruit and vegetables can be just as healthy as fresh produce, that’s why the Government is launching a consultation that will, if agreed, see the Healthy Start scheme let low-income families put their vouchers towards the cost of frozen fruit and vegetables as well as the milk, fresh fruit and vegetables currently allowed.

It means that vulnerable pregnant women and young families with the greatest need will have an added incentive to give their children the best start in life.

Under the proposals, families would benefit from:

• More choice: being able to buy either fresh or frozen fruit and vegetables would mean they can buy whatever most suits their needs.

• More value: Frozen fruit and vegetables can compete on cost with fresh fruit and vegetables.
• More flexibility: Frozen fruit and vegetables can help reduce overall food waste – you can use as much as you need when you need it and store the rest.
• More ways to meet the 5-a-day goal: Eating at least five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables a day can significantly reduce deaths from stroke, some cancers and coronary heart disease. So anything that encourages pregnant women and young families to eat more of all kinds of fruit and vegetables can only be a good thing.

Mums and dads can confidently cook with frozen fruit and vegetables because the nutritional value can be at least as good as fresh.

In fact, as well as counting towards your 5-a-day, frozen fruit and vegetables contain as many, if not more, vitamins than poorly stored or prepared fresh produce.

Secretary of State for Health Andrew Lansley says: ‘We’re looking at including frozen fruit and vegetables in the Healthy Start scheme.

‘Healthy Start helps more than half a million pregnant women and low-income families by giving them vouchers that can be used to buy milk, fresh fruit and vegetables, and also coupons which can be exchanged for free vitamins for women and children.

‘Plain frozen fruit and vegetables count towards your 5-a-day and can contain as many – if not more – vitamins than poorly stored fresh produce.

‘Frozen goods are often cheaper than fresh and they can last longer, so there’s less food waste too. This would mean that families on Healthy Start have access to a much greater range of produce all year round.

‘Eating five portions of fruit and vegetables a day can significantly reduce deaths from stroke, some cancers and coronary heart disease, so it’s important that people have enough.’

Nutritionist Amanda Ursell adds: ‘Families need easy access to healthier food, and a bag of frozen fruit or vegetables from the local corner shop when fresh produce isn’t available can be a healthy lifeline to go with any meal.

‘Frozen fruit and vegetables give parents far more flexibility so it makes complete sense to include frozen fruit and vegetables in Healthy Start.’

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Who’s who in live dental theatre at Showcase ^

A live theatre will be introduced to the exhibition hall at Showcase this year.

This initiative complements the event which is seen as an opportunity to keep up with the latest innovations in dentistry.
 
The theatre will be located prominently within the exhibition hall, complete with a spectator area, and will provide a useful insight into a range of effective techniques to bridge the gap between patients expectations and the reality of cosmetic dentistry. 
 
The schedule is as follows:
 Thursday 14 October 2010

11.30am-1pm   Dr James Hooper   Lava COS – Digital impressioning  
      1pm-3pm   Mark Cronshaw   Laser technology using Waterlase MD  
      3pm-5pm   Julian Caplan   Cerec demonstration – crown  

Friday 15 October 2010

10.30am-12   Zaki Kanaan    Power whitening Zoom procedure  
      12-1pm   Dr Bob Khanna    Botulinum Toxin for the Beginner   
      1pm-3pm   Mervyn Druain    Calming and whitening  
      3pm-4pm   Dr Bob Khanna    Dermal Filler for the Beginner  

Saturday 16 October 2010   10.30am-12   Julian Caplan   Cerec demonstration – inlay/onlay  
      12-1pm   Dr Bob Khanna    Botulinum Toxin for the Beginner  
      1pm-3pm   Mervyn Druian    Calming and whitening  
      3pm-4pm   Dr Bob Khanna    Dermal Filler for the Beginner 
 
There will be some flexibility on the start and finish times to allow for clearing and setting up between sessions. Schedule subject to change without notice.
 
Time spent watching the demonstrations will be included as part of your general CPD hours for time spent in the exhibition.

Separate tickets will not be issued for these sessions. Seats in the spectator area will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.
 
Reserve your complimentary ticket to BDTA Dental Showcase now!

BDTA Dental Showcase 2010 takes place 14-16 October 2010 at ExCeL London.

To register in advance for your complimentary ticket visit www.dentalshowcase.com/visit, call the registration hotline on +44 (0) 1494 729959 or text your name, address, occupation and GDC number to 07786 206 276.

Advance registration closes 11 October 2010. On-the-day registration: £10 per person.
 
 

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Article: Improving the dentist-technician fit^

There are more than 12,000 dental laboratories in the United States (Napier B, co-executive director, National Association of Dental Laboratories, oral communication, 7 January 2009), and their staff sizes vary from a single laboratory technician to hundreds of technicians. Many
laboratories are specialised or cater to a certain type of client, while others are full-service laboratories. However, there appears to be a common problem regardless of the size or work orientation of the laboratories and that is a lack of communication between dentists and technicians.

Take digital photos of the patient. I prefer a relatively comprehensive series of images that competent staff members can take, but even just a few photos can be helpful for technicians

 width=370 height=250 /><br /></em></p>
<p></p></blockquote>
<p>
<p>Dr William Yancey and I convened a series of conferences, each known as The Dental Technology Summit, held each February from 2005 to 2009 in Chicago. The conferences were attended by representatives from the dental profession, the dental industry, laboratories, academic institutions, professional organisations and others.</p>
<p>
<p>These conferences identified most of the current problems in the dental industry. It was the consensus of the attendees that one of the major challenges facing the <br />laboratory industry and clinical dentistry is the lack of interaction and communication between dentists and technicians (Christensen, Yancey, 2005; Christensen, Yancey, 2005).</p>
<p>
<p>In addition, in a questionnaire sent to laboratory directors of 199 dental laboratories located in all 50 states, responses indicated that there is a lack of communication between dentists and laboratory technicians (Afsharzand, Rashedi, Petropoulos, 2006). That survey showed that a large percentage of respondents agreed that lack of communication by dentists to technicians is best reflected by inadequacy in work authorisation forms sent to the technician (Afsharzand, Rashedi, Petropoulos, 2006).</p>
<p>
<p>Other authors have pointed out the significant problems with the current state of dentist/laboratory technician communication (Kahng, 2006; Mendelson, 2006; Killian, 2006; Small, 2006; Phelan, 2002; Leith, Lowry, O’Sullivan, 2000; Davenport et al, 2000; Lang, 1999).</p>
<p>
<p>In this article, I will suggest several easily implemented policies that will improve dentist/laboratory interaction and communication and, subsequently, the quality of oral health services. Some of the following suggestions can be implemented whether or not your laboratory is close to your practice, and others require a close proximity of the two.</p>
<p>Attending courses together In my opinion, dentists and technicians’ joint attendance at continuing professional development (CPD) events is one of the best methods to improve interaction and <br />communication between the two.</p>
<p>
<p>When dentists and technicians attend a course together, they hear and read the same information. Together, they discuss the course and the information provided. They determine the pertinent parts of the course related to their mutual interests, and it is quite likely that they will implement some of the information they have learned.</p>
<p>
<p>If the laboratory you use is far from your practice, you need to arrange a meeting together near the course location. </p>
<p><strong>Hypothetical course </strong><br />As an example of the significant potential value of enhancing dentist/technician communication via jointly attended CPD classes, I will describe the benefits of these professionals participating together in a course on a subject of high interest: zirconia-based crowns and fixed prostheses.</p>
<p>
<p>• Zirconia frameworks <br />Recent research demonstrated the importance of using the optimum formulation and firing temperature of superficial ceramic or precise pressing of superficial ceramic over zirconia (CR Clinicians Report, 2008). When dentists hear this information in a CPD course, yet their technicians are unaware of these important laboratory challenges, these measures are not implemented and patients suffer the results. Communication between the dentist and the <br />technician is mandatory to prevent these errors and is eased if they both learn the same information at the same time.</p>
<p>
<p>• Tooth preparations <br />Some manufacturers have indicated that tooth preparations for all-ceramic crowns should be the same as (or similar to) porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) tooth preparations. Technicians from many laboratories have reported different observations to me. Although all-ceramic crowns can be made on PFM tooth preparations, somewhat deeper tooth preparations allow for stronger and more aesthetic all-ceramic restorations by providing optimum space for both the zirconia and the superficial ceramic. Dentists cutting PFM tooth preparations for all-ceramic crowns compromise technicians’ ability to provide optimum restorative results. Technicians learn this by trial and error, but dentists may never learn of it without communicating with their laboratory technicians.</p>
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<p>• Taper of full-crown tooth preparations for zirconia-based restorations <br />Often, the taper of full-crown tooth preparations is excessive because of deep previous restorations or previously over prepared teeth. If technicians allow only the manufacturer-suggested 0.3-0.5mm thickness of zirconia to be milled as the framework, the superficial ceramic required for optimum tooth anatomy may be too thick, thus inviting superficial ceramic fracture. To prevent subsequent superficial ceramic fracture, the zirconia frameworks need to be built to simulate in miniature the anatomical characteristics of the eventual crown (CR Clinicians Report, 2008). This example demonstrates the need for both dentist and technician to know this subject well and to assist each other in avoiding superficial ceramic crown fracture in clinical service.</p>
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<p>The bottom line is this: if dentists and technicians learn the full perspective on clinical techniques and processes in CPD courses they attend together, better clinical results will ensue. Take your technician to CPD courses with you.</p>
<p><strong>Holding private meetings </strong><br />Meeting with your laboratory technician is valuable if your laboratory is close to your practice. Going to breakfast or lunch together allows time for discussion of mutually important points related to laboratory and clinical subjects. Such meetings build collegiality, mutual understanding and trust. They allow the dentist and the technician to discuss specific difficult cases, assess materials, compare costs and characteristics of specific types of restorations, and evaluate decisions made relative to overall and specific questions.<br /><strong><br />Developing optimal communication in laboratory orders</strong><br />Insufficient communication between dentist and technician is a well-known and universal problem. As a ridiculous but common example, some laboratory orders for removable partial dentures come to technicians in terms as limited as ‘make partial – A2’. Is there any wonder why such <br />prostheses do not meet high quality standards? A number of American states are passing laws requiring more two-way communication between dentists and laboratories. For example, the Florida Dental Laboratory Association has developed some sample forms to help dentists and technicians comply with their state’s new law.</p>
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<p>In addition to better forms, I suggest instituting a few procedures that have the potential to increase the quality of communication.</p>
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<p>Take digital photos of the patient. I prefer a relatively comprehensive series of images that competent staff members can take, but even just a few photos can be helpful for technicians. As an example, for an anterior fixed partial denture (FPD), I suggest at least taking photos of the following: a full face, a natural smile, the lips and cheeks retracted, and the dentist holding the selected shade tab adjacent to the remaining natural teeth.</p>
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<p>In addition, and for a more complete series, I prefer two lateral mirror views of the teeth in occlusion and mirror views of the maxillary and mandibular arches. This series of seven photos may be too comprehensive for every dentist or every case, but the dentist should at least send a photo of the teeth showing their colour and anatomy and a shade tab held adjacent to the teeth.<br />In difficult cases, invite the technician to see the patient.</p>
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<p>When the laboratory and clinical offices are close together, the technician’s observation of the patient is invaluable in difficult cases. When the technician actually sees the patient’s smile characteristics, the colour of the gingiva, the occlusion and any other peculiar characteristics, the clinical result will be better.</p>
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<p>Describe the desired characteristics thoroughly. The dentist should provide a complete description of the restoration he or she desires: metal or non-metal materials, presence of ceramic or metal margins, the degree of tooth anatomy and staining preferred, and any other desired or peculiar characteristics, including pontic form.</p>
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<p>Many dentists compromise the quality of restorations by not providing enough information to technicians. I use custom drawings of my preference for tooth anatomy, specific pontic form or any other characteristics related to the patient being treated.</p>
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<p>Consult by telephone regarding intermediate steps. When a try-in of a denture or a framework try-in for a removable partial denture or an FPD requires some changes, the dentist should call the technician and describe the changes while the case is fresh in his or her mind. Communication by writing alone is seldom sufficient.</p>
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<p><strong>Incorporating technicians into your practice </strong><br />At the beginning of my career, I sent almost all laboratory work to laboratories distant from my office. The results usually were adequate, but occasionally the quality of my work was compromised inadvertently because sending a prosthesis with minor problems back to the laboratory would have caused inconvenience for the patient and significant loss of income for the practice.</p>
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<p>The tendency was to accept some laboratory work that could have been improved in a few minutes if the technician had been on the premises. Therefore, for the latter portion of my career, my practice has included in-office laboratory technicians.</p>
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<p>In my opinion, there is absolutely no comparison in the clinical quality level attainable via the in-office laboratory versus the remote laboratory. When a laboratory technician is in the dentist’s practice and sees, even momentarily, most of the patients, colour matching and occlusion <br />automatically improve. The technician learns how many laboratory decisions influence clinical quality, thus improving the dentist’s ability to produce high-quality aesthetic results.</p>
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<p>If a crown, FPD, removable partial denture or complete denture is slightly wrong, it requires only a <br />few minutes for the in-house technician to modify the restoration without forcing the patient to make a costly reappointment.</p>
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<p>In my opinion, if a practitioner is placing 30 or more units of laboratory-made crowns or fixed prostheses per month, an in-house technician may be a better clinical and financial choice than sending laboratory work out to geographically distant laboratories. If a dentist is in a building with compatible peers, and the practices’ combined number of units of fixed or removable prostheses meets the level needed to provide an adequate income for a technician or technicians, the dentists should consider bringing the laboratory into their practice or building. </p>
<p><strong>Making post-operative telephone calls to technicians</strong><br />While the treatment I have just completed for a patient is still in my mind, I like to call the technician to discuss what I saw clinically as the restoration was seated. Maybe a <br />contact area was too tight, the occlusion was slightly too high or too low, a pontic form needed to be changed, the occlusion on a partial or complete denture was too high or the border extensions were too long. Even though I corrected the problems, the technician needs to know how the restorations seated.</p>
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<p>This communication may reduce the number of such problems in future cases. Conversely, when a restoration drops into the mouth with little or no adjustment, it takes only a brief telephone call reporting the good news to help make a happy and confident technician.</p>
<p><strong>Initiating or joining inclusive organisations</strong><br />For some unknown reason, dentists and technicians in America have segregated themselves into two autonomous camps when it comes to professional organisations <br />and even study clubs.</p>
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<p>Seek out – or form yourself – organisations that encourage interaction between the two groups. Some of the most beneficial educational experiences in my professional life as a prosthodontist have been in such situations. We must learn from each other.</p>
<p><strong>Promoting integrated education of dental and laboratory technology students</strong><br />It makes sense for dental and laboratory technology students to be educated in the same environment, yet this practice seems largely to have gone by the wayside. How have we lost this concept? There are notable examples in which integrated dentist/technician educational <br />programmes are still functional, but most joint dentist/technician programmes have disappeared.<br />If you are a private practitioner, you can only encourage the establishment and continuation of such programmes.</p>
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<p>If you are an educator, my opinion is that it should be one of your primary goals to encourage and eventually incorporate these programmes, either in the same school or by combining programmes of dental schools with technicians’ programmes in nearby community colleges.</p>
<p><strong>Summary</strong><br />Communication between dentists and dental technicians is known to be inadequate. Reasons for this problem are clear but remedies have been slow to evolve.</p>
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<p>I suggest the following concepts for dentists and technicians to improve dentist/technician integration and communication and, ultimately, to improve patient care:<br />• Increasing the quality and scope of communication in laboratory orders<br />• Attending CPD courses together<br />• Holding private meetings<br />• Incorporating technicians into dental practices or buildings<br />• Making post-operative telephone calls to technicians<br />• Initiating or joining study clubs or joining dental organisations that include both dentists and technicians<br />• Promoting integrated education of dental and laboratory technology students. Improving interaction and communication between dentists and laboratory technicians cannot be achieved without proactive change on the part of both groups.</p>
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<p><em>Christensen GJ (2009) Improving dentist-technician interaction and communication. JADA 140(4): 475-78. Copyright © 2009 American Dental Association. All rights reserved. Reprinted by permission. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or official policies of the American Dental Association.</em></p>
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<p><strong>References</strong><br />References for this article are available on request. Please email newsdesk@dentistry.co.uk.</p>
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<p><img style=float: right; src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Private-Den-Live-logo.png alt=

Dr Gordon J Christensen will be speaking at Private Dentistry Live! on 12 November 2010 at the Royal College of Physicians, London. For further information, call Independent Seminars on 0800 371652 or visit www.independentseminars.co.uk

 

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Oral-B goes sonic^

Oral-B is launching a sonic powered toothbrush, the Oral-B Pulsonic SmartSeries with SmartGuide.

The Oral-B Pulsonic, available through dental channels, has a five-speed brushing action (clean, sensitive, massage, extended clean and polish) and offers 31,000 vibrations.

Oral-B has also taken their expertise in manual toothbrush design and has configured the bristles in such a way as to maximise plaque removal.

Like the Triumph, the Oral-B Pulsonic with Smart Guide contains a microchip in the handle that communicates information to the user via a wireless remote display, the SmartGuide.

This encourages patients to adhere to the universally recommended brushing time of two minutes.

Moreover, clinical research has shown that patients are five times more likely to brush for two minutes, twice a day, when using a SmartGuide [1].

It also contains a quadrant timer, which will prompt your patients to pay equal attention to all areas of the mouth. It reduces plaque, even in proximal areas, thus improving gingival health.

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Reference: 1. Cronin et al, 2010, P&G Data on file

 

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Dental practice offers FREE mouth cancer checks^

A dental practice is staging FREE mouth cancer checks to mark Mouth Cancer Action Month.

Dr Gary Rowland, principal dentist at Perfect 32 in Beverley, Yorkshire, is keen to stress the vital role dental teams can play in spotting early signs – and his practice is offering a free screening day.

If caught early enough, survival rates rise from just 50% to 90% – the problem is that only around a third of all mouth cancer cases are diagnosed early.

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<p style=text-align: right;><em><strong>The team at Perfect 32</strong></em></p>
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<p>Perfect 32’s free mouth cancer screening day takes place on Wednesday 25 November.</p>
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<p>Mouth cancer screening normally costs £50 for new patients and £40 for existing patients.</p>
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<p>Mouth cancer can occur in any part of the mouth, tongue, lips, throat, salivary glands and other sites in the head and neck.</p>
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<p>These ‘mouth cancers’ have a higher proportion of deaths per number of cases than breast cancer, skin melanoma or cervical cancer and some 70% of all head and neck cancers are directly related to smoking and drinking.</p>
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<p>Dr Rowland says: ‘You should never ignore ulcers that do not heal within three weeks, red or white patches in the mouth, or any unusual lumps or swellings. Symptoms can include difficulty eating, speaking and swallowing but these indicators are characteristic of advanced stage carcinoma. Early stage changes are usually asymptomatic. This why it is vital to have regular screening.’</p>
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<p>He adds: ‘Catching this disease early is of paramount importance. In April 2007 we invested in a Velscope system that uses fluorescent light to detect abnormal tissue, including cancer and pre-cancer, that may not be visible to the naked eye. Velscope is a detection device, not a diagnostic tool. If we find abnormal cells in our patients’ mouths they will be referred to a specialist.</p>
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<p>‘Last year, 10 of our patients were referred to hospital – that amounts to a 50% increase on the previous year.’</p>
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<p>Keith Altman, chairman of the British Dental Association’s Central Committee for Hospital Dental Services, says: ‘We can’t stress enough the importance of patients going to see their dentist regularly as the earlier the condition is detected the better the prognosis.</p>
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<p>‘Most of the patients we see in hospitals with oral cancer are referred by dentists. As dentists routinely screen patients for oral cancer, they play an important role in diagnosing the condition.’</p>
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<p>Mouth cancer is often discovered in the later stages of its development and this is the primary reason for the consistently high death rate.</p>
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<p>Mouth cancer treatment often results in severe disfigurement, and can seriously compromise sufferers’ quality of life.</p>
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<p> </p>
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<p>It is vital to be aware of the disease, especially if you fall into any of the high-risk categories.<br />• Tobacco is the main cause of mouth cancer<br />• Alcohol together with tobacco contributes to three-quarters of cases <br />• Studies relate a sexually transmitted infection called human papilloma virus (HPV) to more than 20,000 cancer cases in the past five years<br />• Poor diet lacking fruit and vegetables is linked to increased risk</p>
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<p> </p>
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<p><em><strong>The Free Mouth Cancer Screening Day is strictly by appointment only. <br />Please call 01482 863 667 to make an appointment.</strong></em></p>
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Cutting-edge facelift for dental association^
<p>The European Association for Osseointegration (EAO) has taken on a new identity to better reflect the advanced scientific knowledge and cutting-edge technology of its members and the profession.</p>
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<p>A new, more modern-looking logo and distinctive colour scheme was unveiled today (Friday) at the EAO’s 19th International Congress in Glasgow.</p>
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<p>EAO president, Professor Christoph Hämmerle, says: ‘The association was founded almost 20 years ago so it was time to give the it a major facelift to better reflect the organisation which has become a leading authority on dental implantology.’</p>
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<p>‘Our previous logo, which incorporated the 12 stars of European Union, was well known among our membership and the many thousand delegates who have attended our annual conferences. But it didn’t really set us apart from the many European federations who use a similar motif.’</p>
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<p>The new logo uses modern typography and design to project a more dynamic feel to the association while the colours red and grey are now used to better portray its influence.</p>
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<p>The soundwaves that radiate from the name symbolise EAO’s purpose of ‘spreading and sharing knowledge’ at the same time as reflecting its aim of bridging the gap between science and clinical practice.</p>
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<p>The new identity is being incorporated in all the Association’s communications materials including stationery, membership certificates, and all new publications.</p>
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<p>The introduction of the new logo, style and colours have also provided an opportunity for EAO to redesign its website (<a href=http://www.eao.org>www.eao.org</a>).</p>
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<p>The site has been remodelled to make information easier to find and to provide greater interactivity for members.</p>
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<p>‘The new look and feel of the association really reflects the energy and drive of the EAO,’ Dr Paul Stone, EAO scientific chairman and EAO president elect explains.</p>
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<p>‘We are confident that it will help us to enhance our image and to attract new members. The EAO has a great deal to offer clinicians, researchers, dentists and dental students. In fact, the knowledge that exists within the association is unparalleled.’</p>
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<p>The EAO Glasgow 2010 Congress is being held held at the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre from 6-9 October and has so far been attended by nearly 3,000 dentists from around the globe.</p>
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Zap the way to a cleaner dental surgery^
<p>Dental teams can zap their way to a cleaner dental surgery and learn all about infection control with Schülke’s new online game!<br /> <br />As a leading manufacturer of infection control products for the dental surgery, Schülke aims to raise awareness of surface infection control in a fun and engaging manner.</p>
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<p>With the help of the company’s mascot for surgery surface disinfection, ‘Mike’ Mikrozid, clinicians and dental nurses are invited to try their hand at ridding their surgery of the infective invaders using products from the mikrozid range as their weapons of choice.</p>
<p>Using the arrow keys on the keyboard to move around the virtual surgery and the space bar to kill invading bugs, dental professionals of all ages are sure to enjoy this light hearted and educational game.<br /> <br />The mikrozid range from schülke is the UK’s number one choice of cleaner and disinfectants for use in the dental surgery, including well known names such as mikrozid AF, mikrozid sensitive and terralin protect.<br /> <br />For more information, cal 0114 254 3500 or visit the new dedicated surface disinfection website <a href=http://www.schulke.co.uk/dental-hygiene-products/>www.schulke.co.uk/dental-hygiene-products/</a>.<br />Visit <a href=http://www.comparethemikrozid.com>www.comparethemikrozid.com</a>. </p>
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<p>Mike is Schülke’s number one expert on surface cleaning and disinfecting, and is here to provide you with the best tips on how to conform with current regulations and guidelines.  <br /> <br /> It is common knowledge that surfaces are prone to contamination by potentially infectious microorganisms; but by using stringent and systematic decontamination procedures, the risk of infection will be considerably reduced to both staff and patients alike.<br /> <br />‘It’s easy to make sure that surfaces are cleaned and disinfected after each clinical session,’ says Mike, ‘the secret? Zoning.’<br /> <br />‘Zoning is the preliminary step to surface disinfection and focuses on clearly defining areas prone to contamination. Below is a zoning protocol which should be carried out at the end of each session.’<br /> <br />Clean and disinfect:<br /> <br />·     All work surfaces and dental carts<br />·     Drawer and cupboard handles<br />·     Chair and light unit<br />·     Spittoon, filters and aspirator equipment<br />·     Sinks and taps<br />·     Computer and keyboard</p>
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Free iPod or iPad with digital imaging order^
<p>Receive a free iPod or iPad or even both when you order Kodak Dental System Digital imaging products between now and the end of the year. </p>
<p>The Kodak RVG 6500 is the latest addition to the market leading sensors from Kodak Dental Systems.</p>
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<p>These benefit from having Wi-Fi mobility and in addition you can send the image direct to an iPOD, iPhone or iPAD, down loading later to your PC. </p>
<p>Check <a href=http://www.dentistry.co.uk/product_guide/pdfs/kodak_11102010.pdf>here</a> for those offers that include Free Apple iPods and iPads.</p>
<p>^1286755200^3272^Free iPod or iPad with digital imag…^Receive a free iPod or iPad or even both when you order Kodak Dental System Digital imaging products between now and the end of the year. Th…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/ipad.png<br />
Binge-drinking smokers run risk of oral cancers^
<p>Young adults who smoke, drink and eat low levels of fruit and vegetables are at higher risk of contracting cancers of the mouth, oesophagus and larynx.</p>
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<p>New research reveals these factors remain the major triggers of the diseases which kill more than 100,000 people across Europe and 10,000 in the UK alone, each year.</p>
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<p>The study – by experts from the University of Aberdeen – aims to understand what factors were important in these cancers among the under-50s.</p>
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<p>The findings confirmed 88% of these cancers – known collectively as upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers – in this age group, were caused by smoking tobacco, alcohol consumption and/or a lack of fruit and vegetables in a person’s diet.</p>
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<p>The five-year pan-Europe study looked at 350 patients under the age of 50 with these cancers, and 400 patients free of these diseases.</p>
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<p>Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Aberdeen, Gary Macfarlane who led the study said: ‘Cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract are on the increase throughout the world and to date the increases have been greatest in young adults under the age of 50.</p>
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<p>‘For example, we have witnessed a doubling of oral cancer rates in 40-49 year old men in the UK over the last 20 years.’</p>
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<p>‘Our study aimed to determine whether smoking, alcohol consumption and low fruit and vegetable intake remained the most significant risk factors for UADT cancers in this age group, or whether other novel factors including genetics and infection could be relatively more important.</p>
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<p>‘Our findings confirmed that smoking tobacco, heavy alcohol consumption and a lack of fruit and vegetable in a person’s diet remained the most important causes of cancers of the UADT.</p>
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<p>‘The increase in the occurrence of UADT cancers in this age group is likely to be linked to increased alcohol consumption and future studies will determine whether “binge” drinking carries a particularly high risk.’</p>
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<p>The results of the study – funded by a European Union grant – indicate the public health message in preventing cancers of the UADT should remain the same for young and old alike.</p>
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<p>Professor Macfarlane continued: ‘The results of our study further emphasise that the message we need to be communicating to the public remains the same — that smoking, drinking and diet are the major triggers of these diseases at all ages.’</p>
<p>^1286755200^3270^Binge-drinking smokers run risk of …^Young adults who smoke, drink and eat low levels of fruit and vegetables are at higher risk of contracting cancers of the mouth, oesophagus …^<br />
Lifestyle choices increase mouth cancer risks^
<p>Research has shown that young adults are increasing their risks of oral cancer through the lifestyle choices they make.</p>
<p>The number of young people being diagnosed with mouth, throat and food pipe cancer has doubled and researchers believe this is due to excessive smoking, drinking and an unhealthy diet among the young.</p>
<p>These cancers, which are known as Upper aero-digestive tract cancers, are responsible for 10,000 deaths in the UK alone.</p>
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<p>Researchers at Aberdeen University conducted a five-year study, which examined 350 patients under the age of 50 with UADT cancers and compared the results to 400 people who did not have the disease.</p>
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<p>It was discovered that nine in 10 of the cancers had been caused by smoking, drinking and a lack of fruit and vegetables in the diet.</p>
<p>Professor Macfarlane, who led the study, said: ‘Our study aimed to determine whether smoking, alcohol consumption and low fruit and vegetable intake remained the most significant risk factors for UADT cancers in this age group, or whether other novel factors including genetics and infection could be relatively more important.</p>
<p>‘The results of our study further emphasise that the message we need to be communicating to the public remains the same – that smoking, drinking and diet are the major triggers of these diseases at all ages.’</p>
<p>Chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter, said: ‘Latest figures show that over 5,300 new cases a year are diagnosed in the UK, and one person dies every five hours from the disease. Action really must be taken to raise awareness and change these figures.</p>
<p>‘With Mouth Cancer Action Month taking place this November, now is the perfect time for people to rethink their lifestyle choices, and make sure they are doing what they can to protect their health.’</p>
<p>Tobacco is considered to be the leading cause of mouth cancer, and those who smoke and drink alcohol to excess are up to 30 times more likely to develop the condition.</p>
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<p>Alcohol aids the absorption of tobacco in the mouth, which transforms saliva into a deadly cocktail that damages cells and can turn them cancerous.</p>
<p>Around a third of cases are thought to be linked to an unhealthy diet. Increasing evidence suggests that omega 3, found in fish and eggs, can help to lower risks. As can foods high in fibre such as nuts, seeds, whole-wheat pasta and brown rice.</p>
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<p>Another key risk factor for mouth cancer is the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). US studies have linked more than 20,000 cancer cases to the virus in the last five years.</p>
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<p>Transmitted via oral sex, people with multiple sexual partners are more at risk. Oral health experts suggest HPV may rival tobacco and alcohol as the most common risk factor.</p>
<p>Mouth Cancer Action Month is an annual campaign taking place every November.</p>
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<p>The campaign is organised by the Foundation and aims to raise awareness of mouth cancer, its early symptoms and the common risk factors.</p>
<p>The National Dental Helpline is a confidential and independent service. Fully qualified dental experts are available to offer information and advice on all oral healthcare topics.</p>
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<p>Contact the Helpline on 0845 063 1188, between 9am and 5pm; alternatively, email on helpline@dentalhealth.org.</p>
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BDA blasts ‘can’t quite cope’ CQC chaos^
<p>The Care Quality Commission is stalling on giving dentists the information they need about registration, despite discussions between the health watchdog and dentist representatives.</p>
<p>A recent meeting between Cynthia Bower, chief executive of the Care Quality Commission (CQC), and John Milne and Susie Sanderson, of the British Dental Association (BDA), had raised hopes of clarification over the whole process of registration with the health watchdog body.</p>
<p>But these were dashed by the CQC’s failure to clear up the questions raised by the dental representatives.</p>
<p>The only information they gleaned was that the number of crown post offices able to countersign CRB checks will quadruple but, despite pressure from the BDA, the CQC failed to confirm the exact number of post offices or their locations. <br /> <br />And the BDA is still trying to confirm whether all practice staff require CRB checks.</p>
<p>Nicknaming the CQC, ‘Can’t Quite Cope’ in her BDA website blog last week, Susie, chair of the executive board, writes: ‘The BDA has been saying for a long time now that the role that the Care Quality Commission (CQC) is taking on in registering dental practices is inappropriate.</p>
<p>‘It’s with a particularly heavy heart that I sit at the BDA’s London headquarters this afternoon writing that, more than a week after that meeting took place, we still don’t have firm information about what the CQC and the Post Office will be doing differently. Quite frankly, that smacks of a long-winded bureaucratic process somewhere. We think we’ve won a concession on the number of post offices at which you’ll be able to gain your CRB check, but we don’t know for certain. We think that the improved information and inconsistency we need may be forthcoming, but we don’t know.’</p>
<p>She adds: ‘If this is how the CQC, or as I’m beginning to refer to them Can’t Quite Cope, thinks it needs to act to reassure dentists, then I shudder to think how it’s going to behave if it thinks it needs to censure a practice.’</p>
<p>The BDA is also trying to get confirmation on exactly who, within the practice, will require CRB checks.</p>
<p>Dentists throughout England are reported to be facing severe practical problems in the registration process.</p>
<p>Criticisms include the very tight timetable to complete the registration process and the ‘duplicative and inappropriate nature’ of compliance requirements.</p>
<p>The BDA’s recent general dental practice committee meeting gave vent to the profession’s anger where representatives demanded a delay so that practices would not be in danger of missing deadlines or be forced to close while waiting for the formalities to be completed.</p>
<p>The committee was particularly appalled at having to enrol for something before knowing cost.</p>
<p>A BDA spokesperson said that the CQC understands the system was unpopular and also accepted that the process had been rushed and was far from ideal, but it was ‘confident that it could pull it round’.</p>
<p>Planning ahead, the CQC chief executive promises to co-operate with the BDA to resolve problems as they arise and provide the profession with the information it needs.</p>
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Dental commentator to lobby MPs over CQC^
<p>A dental plan expert has joined the chorus of opposition to the Care Quality Commission’s regulation of dentistry.</p>
<p>And DPAS chairman, Quentin Skinner, will use this year’s Dental Showcase to publicise the campaign which is already gaining momentum amongst DPAS client practices, all of whom have received a questionnaire aimed at gauging the level of support in the profession. </p>
<p>Early response to the questionnaire has been very encouraging with 100% backing for the stance being adopted by Mr Skinner. <br /> <br />He says that while appreciating that the CQC is a ‘welcome initiative to areas of health provision that are as yet unregulated’, he is encouraging the profession to come together with the aim of making the public much more aware of the extra cost and the reduced access that registration will bring to dentistry. <br /> <br />Together with colleagues from the Dental Law Partnership, who conducted a detailed analysis of the requirements for registration, Quentin concludes there is ‘no evidence that the existing regulatory mechanism allows unsafe delivery of dental care, nor is there evidence that the existing regulation puts patient care at risk’. </p>
<p>The analysis has demonstrated that the introduction of CQC regulation of the dental profession will result in widespread duplication of existing areas of regulation placing an unnecessary administrative and financial burden on both practitioners and the CQC themselves, which will result in a significant waste of resources.</p>
<p>He says: ‘We have concluded that the additional burden of the proposed CQC registration and CQC regulation of individual dental professionals amounts to substantial duplication of the existing regulation of the dental profession and is not, on a balance of probabilities, likely to produce any significant improvement either in patient safety or treatment outcomes.’</p>
<p>He is now calling on practitioners to register their disquiet by signing a petition that will be available on the DPAS stand (R01) at this week’s Dental Showcase.</p>
<p>He hopes it will provide demonstrable evidence of the support of these views which he can take to a meeting with the chairman of the parliamentary health committee, scheduled for later this month.<br /> <br />For more information on the campaign, visit Stand R01 or call 01747 870910.</p>
<p>^1286755200^3275^Dental commentator to lobby MPs ove…^A dental plan expert has joined the chorus of opposition to the Care Quality Commission’s regulation of dentistry.And DPAS chairman, Q…^<br />
New CQC dental FAQ service launches^
<p>A brand new information service aimed at helping practitioners through the new Care Quality Commission registration process will launch soon.</p>
<p>
<p>The FAQ (frequently asked questions) service will be published on <a href=http://www.bdpma.org.uk>www.bdpma.org.uk</a>.</p>
<p>
<p><span id=main style=visibility: visible;><span id=search style=visibility: visible;><span class=f><cite></cite></span></span></span><cite></cite>Many BDPMA members will be heavily involved in registering with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) over the coming weeks.</p>
<p>
<p>All providers of primary dental care services in England that carry on regulated activities must be registered with the CQC by 1 April 2011.<br /> <br />To help members to prepare for registration, the BDPMA is establishing a frequently asked questions (FAQ) service about the new system.<br /> <br />It will work as follows:<br />If a BDPMA member has an enquiry about CQC registration, they can email their question to the BDPMA. If the BDPMA can provide the answer from CQC published documents or from its website, it will publish the question and the answer (with references) on the members only section of the BDPMA website.<br /> <br />If the BDPMA cannot find the answer, it will forward the question to the CQC and publish the question and their answer (with references) on the members only section of the BDPMA website.<br /> <br />As with similar agreements CQC has with other organisations, they will also share the most common questions (and the answers) they receive directly from practice managers and, again, the BDPMA will publish them on the members only section of the BDPMA website.<br /> <br />Over time, this will result in a comprehensive registration FAQ section on the BDPMA website which members can reference quickly and easily. The BDPMA expects to have this service in operation in the next few weeks – the latest news will be on the BDPMA website and its Facebook page.<br /> <br />Speaking about the new service, Amelia Bray, BDPMA Chairman, said: ‘The launch of the CQC registration FAQ service will be a major benefit to our members. Not only will it provide the answers to their questions but in time the FAQ section will be a quick reference point for answers to the most commonly asked questions.’</p>
<p>^1286841600^3276^New CQC dental FAQ service launches^A brand new information service aimed at helping practitioners through the new Care Quality Commission registration process will launch soon…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Amelia-Bray.png<br />
Dental implants more popular in recession^
<p>Recession-hit Brits are seeking a ‘cheaper-in-the-long-run’ permanent solution to their teeth problems by opting for dental implants.<br /> <br />Dental implants have grown in popularity over the past two years as patients seek to save money and cut the costs of continued corrective dental surgery. </p>
<p>According to new figures, the number of people looking for dental implants in the UK has more than tripled over the past two years in spite of the recession.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Bruno Silva, a dental surgeon and implant specialist in Brighton, says: ‘We have noticed a big increase in patients having implants.’</p>
<p>Patients previously excluded from having implants due to the lack of bone density are able to have implants with bone augmentation.</p>
<p>
<p>This is where the surgeon will add artificial bone to the jaw bone to allow for the implant to be placed.</p>
<p>
<p>The Brighton Implant Clinic has CT machine on site, allowing them to make 3D X-rays to determine the bone density for each patient.</p>
<p>Dental implants can be really expensive and patients are quoted a complete range of prices, some so high, people opt out of having implants; whereas Dr Silva prides himself on offering affordable prices for implants.</p>
<p>
<p>He says: ‘People are often astonished at the prices we offer. A single screw implant including all the surgery and final crown start from £995, however if you are having multiple teeth the price per tooth could be much less. This is the same price as a bridge and in the long term implants are more beneficial.’</p>
<p>
<p>Bridges require the grinding of the adjacent teeth, which can lead to decay and nerve damage. The implant is a single entity and is easier torectify any problems than a bridge.</p>
<p>A visit to Brighton Implant Clinic is affordable and patients can pay for their treatment as they go along, rather than the whole payment upfront.</p>
<p>
<p>The Clinic has also recently introduced the five-year implant guarantee plan, which allows patients to safeguard their investments.</p>
<p>
<p>Patients fin that the costs of implants are worth it as they can last 15-20 years or more and your lifestyle remains the same as though you had real teeth, which in the case of dentures this is not always possible.</p>
<p>Implant surgery is not just an option to replace a single tooth or several; a procedure becoming more popular is to replace all the teeth with an implant bridge, this is called same day teeth or teeth in a day.</p>
<p>
<p>This means a minimum of four implants are placed in the upper jaw for example, two on either side and this holds a bridge of 12 teeth. This is a brilliant and permanent alternative to dentures.</p>
<p>Implants are not exclusive to older people who have lost teeth through disease or poor oral hygiene, but also younger people who have lost teeth in accidents are coming forward to have implants fitted.</p>
<p>
<p>This is a successful way to overcome dentures or crown work. Implants can be applicable to most patients, but smokers in particular have a longer healing process, especially bases of bone augmentation as there is reduced blood flow to the area, this is all highlighted and explained to the patients at the consultation.</p>
<p>The clinics are finding people are booking their surgery few months or more down the line in time for them to give up smoking so, in the long term, they are making great lifestyle choices that comes with having implants.</p>
<p>For more information on dental implants, call Brighton Implant Clinic on 0844 815 1414 or visit <a href=http://www.brightonimplantclinic.com>www.brightonimplantclinic.com</a></p>
<p>^1286841600^3277^Dental implants more popular in rec…^Recession-hit Brits are seeking a ‘cheaper-in-the-long-run’ permanent solution to their teeth problems by opting for dental implants. D…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Dr-Bruno-Silva.png<br />
Dental X-ray camera goes space age^
<p>Space-age technology has been incorporated into a new tool for dentists that may make a trip to the surgery less painful for patients. </p>
<p>The dental instrument is a small, high-resolution X-ray camera capable of imaging what goes on inside teeth with a minimal amount of effort – and a minimum amount of discomfort to patients.<br /> <br />Swedish company, Nanospace, is responsible for developing the new approach to healthcare and the Scint-X company desigend the camera.</p>
<p>With this new approach, the images obtained are substantially more detailed than possible with similar instruments and offer increased contrast. </p>
<p>At the very core of the instrument is a miniaturised device called a structured scintillator that converts X-rays into visible light. </p>
<p>Scint-X expert Per Wiklund  says: ‘Our scintillator uses a specially structured silicon substrate and with this unique and patented manufacturing technique we can obtain substantially higher resolution than currently on the market today.’</p>
<p>As the unit is a lot thinner and generally smaller than other devices, the amount of discomfort for the patient is reduced. </p>
<p>The scintillator design that Scint-X proposed was handed over to Nanospace, which engineered the device with precision at its micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) facility. </p>
<p>CEO of Nanospace, Tor-Arne Grönland, says: ‘The investment in our special machine [to produce MEMS] was entirely driven by the demand for capacity and quality in our production for space projects. Later, a number of non-space companies and research groups, such as Scint-X, have taken advantage of the processes and the capacity we now have.’</p>
<p>The European Space Agency (ESA) is now ‘exploring with Nanospace the limits of this emerging MEMS-based micropropulsion technology for high-accuracy propulsion applications’ she adds. </p>
<p>‘The synergy between space and non-space research and development, as in the case of Scint-X, illustrates the potential of technology transfer,’ the leader of the ESA Technology Transfer Program Office, Frank M Salzgeber, adds.<br /> <br />For more, visit <a href=http://www.scint-x.com>www.scint-x.com</a>.</p>
<p>^1286841600^3278^Dental X-ray camera goes space age^Space-age technology has been incorporated into a new tool for dentists that may make a trip to the surgery less painful for patients. The d…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/SWEAnnaSensor.png<br />
Book a place at a live facial aesthetics demonstration^
<p>The Dental Directory stand B01 is a must-visit at this year’s Dental Showcase if you are considering introducing facial aesthetics into your practice.</p>
<p>
<p>Over all three days, leading facial aesthetic product manufacturers will be undertaking live product demonstrations with the latest products available.</p>
<p>
<p>Plus, there will be presentations on how to introduce this into your practice and the necessary training and accreditation.<br /> <br />Places are still available. If you are interested in attending a session and would like to find out more, please email your contact details to campaigns@dental-directory.co.uk.<br /> <br />The Dental Directory supplies the largest range of market leading, Botulinum toxins, dermal fillers, skin peel products and cosmeceuticals of any dental dealer – making it the perfect one-stop shop for all of your aesthetic and skin rejuvenation products.</p>
<p>
<p>Their experts will also be on hand to help you with any questions you may have.</p>
<p>^1286841600^3279^Book a place at a live facial aesth…^The Dental Directory stand B01 is a must-visit at this year’s Dental Showcase if you are considering introducing facial aesthetics into your…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/beauty.png<br />
Osteology in Cannes^
<p>In Cannes, the city of the rich and beautiful people, aesthetics has always played a major role, especially at the international film festival.</p>
<p>
<p>In April 2011, the next International Osteology Symposium will illuminate aesthetics from a different dimension and put the spotlight on regenerative therapies with their current possibilities and limits.</p>
<p>In the recent years, regenerative therapies in implantology and periodontology have changed markedly, from pure hard tissue augmentation to comprehensive management and augmentation of bone and soft tissue.</p>
<p>
<p>Both tissues are essential for a stable, functional and aesthetic outcome.</p>
<p>
<p>The scientific programme of Osteology in Cannes reflects on this fact besides recent results on bone regeneration and the handling of complications.</p>
<p>
<p>An important focus will also be on the new treatments and products for soft tissue augmentation. </p>
<p>From 14-16 April 2011, experienced researchers and well-known practitioners will discuss the latest research results and the current treatment concepts.</p>
<p>
<p>The preliminary congress on the Thursday will be entirely practice-oriented: in workshops the participants will be able to discuss treatment methods and train in them practically.</p>
<p>
<p>The main scientific programme on the Friday and the Saturday will show which therapies are today’s state-of-the-art and underpinned by clinical evidence; how risk factors are assessed and how complications are treated.</p>
<p>
<p>Talks and presentations on new studies and with specific treatment tips, and also the clinical forum with a podium discussion of clinical cases, will provide answers to the questions: what are today’s possibilities and limits for regenerative therapy and in what direction will they develop?</p>
<p>The International Osteology Symposia have become established in the last few years as the most important series of congresses on the topic of regeneration.</p>
<p>
<p>Osteology in Cannes will again combine high-quality science with specific clinic and dental practice demands, on one of Europe’s most beautiful coastlines.</p>
<p>
<p>And while “more illusion than reality” is presented at the famous Cannes Film Festival, Osteology will show how clinicians today can achieve “reality” in regeneration which will “stay for long”.</p>
<p>
<p><a href=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/osseo.png><strong><br /></strong></a><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/osseo.png alt=

Osteology in Cannes – the topics:
–  GBR in implant patients – a critical overview
–  Clinical evidence for improvement of the long-term prognosis of teeth through GTR
–  Regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis
–  Sinus floor augmentation
–  Treatment of complex cases
–  Soft tissue aesthetics around teeth and implants
–  New treatment methods in soft tissue augmentation

^1286841600^3280^Osteology in Cannes^In Cannes, the city of the rich and beautiful people, aesthetics has always played a major role, especially at the international film festiv…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/cannes.png
Philips acquires Discus Dental^

Philips has acquired tooth-whitening firm, Discus Dental.
Previously privately held, Discus is the global leader in professional tooth whitening products with brands such as Zoom!, BriteSmile and NiteWhite.
 
In recent years, the company expanded into other areas including oral care, restoratives, endodontics, and soft-tissue lasers.
 
The transaction is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2010, pending regulatory approvals.
 
The takeover will see Philips broaden its portfolio with the array of professional tooth whitening products, as well as the treatment options for applications such as gingivitis and ulcer relief, caries prevention and breath management.

Pieter Nota, chief executive officer of Philips’ consumer lifestyle division, said the deal will complement its existing Sonicare range and strengthen the firm’s standing in the dental industry.

Dr William Dorfman, founder of Discus Denta, says: ‘We created Discus almost 20 years ago with the goal of making it easy to improve patient smiles.
 
‘Since then, millions of people around the world have had smile makeovers using our products and we’ve become a trusted source of clinical solutions for dentists in more than 100 countries and on virtually every continent.

‘By joining the Philips organisation, our products will benefit from unprecedented growth opportunities, making tooth whitening even more accessible to a broader audience.’
 
Following the close of the transaction, Discus will become part of the Philips Consumer Lifestyle sector’s Health and Wellness business.
 
For more information, visit www.discusdental.com.

^1286928000^3283^Philips acquires Discus Dental^Philips has acquired tooth-whitening firm, Discus Dental. Previously privately held, Discus is the global leader in professional tooth white…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Bill-Dorfman.png
Mint to debut at Dental Showcase with tasty offers ^

Mint marketing, established by Kate Adam and Alex Nicolaou to provide a unique marketing and business development service to dental practices, will have much to offer on its stand (V24)
at the BDTA Dental Showcase.
 
• Mint Tease is a one-hour telephone consultation with a dental practice owner or manager to identify strengths and weaknesses in their marketing strategy. Costing £199 normally, these are being offered free to visitors to the Mint stand
 
• Mint Magic is a one-day full examination of a dental practice which results in a clear plan of action to attract high value patients. At the show and for seven days afterwards, Mint Magic bookings will be discounted by 17.5%.
 
• Mint also runs one-day hands on workshop for practice managers responsible for marketing their practice and is offering members of the British Dental Practice Managers’ Association a 10% discount on bookings taken at Dental Showcase
 
Kate Adam and Alex Nicolaou have also formed Mint Alliance – a network of business professionals supplying the dental profession.

Members of the alliance will be on the Mint stand at Dental Showcase offering advice to visitors on everything from social media marketing to brand promotion, the use of videos and website enhancements. 
 
Visitors can also collect a free book of vouchers worth £2,000 in discounts on a wide range of Mint Alliance services.

^1286928000^3281^Mint to debut at Dental Showcase wi…^Mint marketing, established by Kate Adam and Alex Nicolaou to provide a unique marketing and business development service to dental practice…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/pastedGraphic.png
Dental web expert slays TV ‘Dragon’^

TV entrepreneur James Caan, of Dragons’ Den fame, has handed the contract for revamping his website to dental digital marketing experts at Digimax.

James, one of the stars of the famous BBC show, was so impressed with Digimax Dental’s creative director Shaz Memon that he sealed a deal which not only includes a redesign of
www.james-caan.com, but also the reviewing, branding and management of the site.

Shaz, 27, is one of the UK’s rising marketing stars and was listed as one of the Young
Directors of 2009 in the Who’s Who of Britain’s Business Elite series.

He described the account win as ‘a fantastic opportunity to work with one of Britain’s best entrepreneurs’.

Pitching the website facelift to a ‘Dragon’ was a natural move for Shaz. Spurred by artistic passion and respect for James, he stepped forward when a chance encounter offered the opportunity.

Giving the TV entrepreneur honest feedback on his existing website – and pitching changes that would better reflect his expansive business realm – Shaz put his experience and talent on the line – and won.

He said: ‘James-caan.com not only needs to reflect the plethora of business activities that James is involved in, but has to mirror his public persona of being a slick, smooth, stylish and classy
businessman.

‘It needs to deliver on a number of fronts and serve multi-purposes without confusing the user while promoting the James Caan brand and those of the businesses he invests in.’

James added: ‘I was impressed that the designs Digimax presented really encapsulated my brand. Working efficiently with my team, Shaz followed direction well and implemented any changes I wished to incorporate. The new design lifted my existing site into a more professional, streamlined website.’

Digimax Dental will be flashing the flair that snared a ‘Dragon’ on stand R03 at Dental Showcase.

The company, set up in 2003, has delivered award-winning marketing campaigns and was a finalist for a CIM (Chartered Institute of Marketing) Award in the Healthcare category for an on and offline campaign for Sparkle Dental Boutique in west London.

Digimax Dental offers clients a full-range of image and brand enhancement services.
Shaz said: ‘We specialise in dental marketing – establishing branding of a practice through every avenue of public interaction – designing a website, getting it ranked high on Google, creating blogs for fresh content, designing and printing interior graphics, leaflets, stationery, appointment cards, and exhibition stands.

‘We produce copywriting and offer dental practice photography in-house as well.’

Digimax Dental recently launched their second design studio in Marylebone, London.

Meet the team at ExCeL or visit www.digimaxdental.co.uk for further information.

^1286928000^3282^Dental web expert slays TV ‘Drago…^TV entrepreneur James Caan, of Dragons’ Den fame, has handed the contract for revamping his website to dental digital marketing expert…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/caan.png
Orthodontic diary: Brighton belle^

Those arriving in Brighton for the British Orthodontic Society’s pre-conference radiology course were greeted with glorious sunshine and an alluring sea-side location making hard to enter the portals of the renowned Brighton Conference Centre.

However, the auditorium soon filled with delegates eagerly awaiting presentations from the well known Eric Whaites whose superb seminar focused on justification of the IRMER guidelines, limitation and optimisation principles related to dental radiography and radiation protection.

The last presentation, which was particularly relevant and informative, focused on the use of cone beam CT in orthodontics.

The day’s session was concluded with a lively question and answer discussion and an exacting test assessing the knowledge delegates had gained from the day’s excellent presentations.

Sunday 19 September
Following a warm welcome from Dr Peter McCallum, the BOC Chairman, the main scientific programme commenced with the opening session which featured fourteen presentations of recently completed Masters research projects.

The types of studies ranged from lab based experiments to randomised clinical trials and this postgraduate session confirmed and highlighted the excellent research which is conducted within orthodontic teaching units in the UK.

Following this session, the Chapman Prize lecture – Medical disorders in orthodontics – was presented by Dr Anjli Patel whose comprehensive address highlighted the importance, considerations and potential impact that medical conditions can have when planning and providing orthodontic treatment.

Key messages from the lecture included: close liaison with patient’s medical practitioners and modifying possible treatment plans in these cases.

The afternoon session commenced with a lecture by Dr Hisham Badawi who gave an interesting presentation entitled, 3D orthodontic biomechanics research at the University of Alberta.

The presenter described his on-going experimental research, which aimed to quantify and measure 3-dimensionally, the magnitude of orthodontic forces applied to individual teeth.

Key findings presented were that self-ligation appliances appear to generate lower forces compared with conventional appliances. This could have a potentially significant impact on clinical practice, as it appears that self-ligation appliances could be more efficient in terms of treatment length, duration and pain experienced.

However, in contrast, randomised clinical trials report no difference between the two-ligation systems.

The next lecture, Much ado about facial aesthetics: Extractions, expansion and early treatment controversies was given by Dr Jay Bowman.

This excellent speaker gave a thought-provoking and entertaining presentation addressing the current non-extraction/extraction debate.

The lecturer gave a comprehensive overview and critique of the evidence surrounding the relationship between orthodontic extractions and the proposed detrimental effects on profile, smile aesthetics and the TMJ. In summary there appears to be a lack of evidence to support these assumptions, which are currently based on anecdotal research.

The final lecture, Orthognathic planning – A paradigm shift, was given by Dr Balvinder Khambay and Professor Ashraf Ayoub. Planning of orthognathic cases still remains a subjective process with limited consensus on particular management strategies. This interesting and informative lecture proposed a contemporary approach to planning orthognathic cases and was supported by treated clinical cases.

Monday 20 September
Monday morning began with two presentations about lingual orthodontics. The first, presented by Dr Didier Fillion, described the use of the digital Orapix-straight wire technique. This simplifies bonding up of lingual appliances with precise bracket positioning and customised archwires. The many advantages of the straight wire technique were discussed and the method was then illustrated with two clinical cases.

The second lecture was presented by Dr Guiseppe Scuzzo who outlined the evolution of lingual orthodontics and the advantages of the light lingual system including simplified set up and mechanics. The different stages of treatment were described and again the presentation concluded with some illustrated cases.

Following coffee, Dr Tim Wheeler gave a very amusing and well illustrated presentation on the use of clear plastic aligners. He discussed the types of malocclusion which are possible to treat with aligners alone and those which require a combination of aligners and fixed appliances in order to attain the best clinical results. These cases were largely those which required root parallelism or torque control.

The Rising star presentation was by Dr Badri Thiruvenkatachari who described his research into the Dynamax and twin block appliances in the treatment of Class II division 1 malocclusions.

Sixty four patients were entered into a randomised controlled trial comparing these appliances.

During the trial, data was sent to the data monitoring committee who recommended that the trial be stopped prematurely.

Overjet reduction was found to be greater in the twin block group and more adverse events were found in the Dynamax group. There were no statistical differences in impact on daily life. The audience were reminded of the importance of clinical evaluation of new appliances before use.

Another thought-provoking presentation followed with Dr Friedy Luther discussing scientific misconduct both outside and inside dentistry.

Two recent examples in the scientific literature which gained media attention were discussed before potential problems within the dental field were suggested.

These included poor research such as lack of sample size calculation; lack of blinding or randomisation; together with more sinister issues such as photofixing. T

he presentation was concluded with possible solutions to some of these problems.

Delegates returned after lunch to hear Dr Chris Orr and Dr Peter Huntley speak about the orthodontic-restorative interface and how a joint approach can lead to improved treatment outcomes.

The importance of planning, open communication and a mutual understanding of these cases was emphasised in order to achieve ideal aesthetics and a healthy static and functional occlusion. The presentation was illustrated with numerous examples of cases including the management of tooth wear in a patient with a Class II division 2 deep bite malocclusion; management of adults with uneven gingival margins or black triangles; tooth movement in patients with alveolar atrophy and the treatment of severely tipped molars.

The restorative requirement for space if osseointegrated implants are planned was reviewed and the importance of golden proportion discussed.

Prizegiving
Following this was the eagerly awaited sponsored awards and prizegiving, presented by Professor David Bearn.

The first was the Chapman Prize awarded to Anjli Patel for her paper on Medical disorders and orthodontics, which was presented to the conference on the previous day. The Journal of Orthodontics, Scientific Paper of the Year was presented to Fiona Ryan. The ‘Against the Odds’ award was presented to Jonty Meisner while Joe Dwyer and Jonathan Hunter received commendations by the judges.

The Geoffrey Fletcher scholarship was awarded to Jinesh Shah.

Following the MOrth examination this year, the BOS medal and first prize for cases submitted was awarded to Omar Yaqoob, whilst Elin Thomas received second prize and Ross McDowall came third.

The IMorth medal to the best candidate in the examination was awarded to Joanne Birdsall and The William Houston Medal for the best candidate in Edinburgh was awarded to Ross McDowall.  Ross McDowall continued his success with the BOS Clinical Effectiveness prize, with second place awarded to Aine Campbell and third prize to Helen Flint.

The BOS Distinguished Nurse Award was presented to Lisa Drzymala and finally, the BOS Distinguished Technician Award was presented to Vaughan Jones.

Following the prize-giving, Dr Ama Johal and Dr Wendy Turner took to the stage to conclude the session with an informative and interesting presentation on the inter-disciplinary management of the periodontally compromised dentition.

The classification of periodontal diseases was reviewed and the importance of initial recognition and stabilisation before treatment was emphasised. Possible indicators to show when treatment can be commenced were described and treatment mechanics and biomechanical considerations discussed. Finally, delegates were reminded of the need for communication and documentation.

Tuesday 21 September
Following the banquet at the Grand Hotel on Monday evening the enthusiasm of Dr Stephen Chadwick as Chair was welcomed.

The session started with the Clinical Pearls, an excellent part of the programme which allows delegates to learn clinical tips from fellow colleagues in a few short minutes which could potentially save hours at the chair side.

The first Clinical Pearl presented by Michael Cheung demonstrated the use of class II elastics and sectional stainless steel arch wires to distalise first molars. A technique found to work particularly well when treating young females.  Lorraine Barreto presented the ‘modified Parkhouse Technique’ a method used to create space and distalise the canines on a round stainless steel arch wire. The concomitant incisor proclination favours the use of this technique when treating class III malocclusions.

David Spary presented an incredibly entertaining Clinical Pearl, The use of an invisible unbreakable fixed appliance.  He was proceeded by his registrar, Jigar Patel, who went on to demonstrate a simplified class III appliance, an appliance designed by David Spary which uses occlusal splints, buttons and class III elastics to correct anterior displacements.

Helen Taylor showed that zing string can effectively realign periodontally involved teeth and finally Ansa Akram illustrated the accuracy which can be achieved when using a maxillary model repositioning instrument to aid orthognathic treatment planning.

Following on from the Clinical Pearls was the much awaited three year follow up looking at the effectiveness of early class III orthopaedic treatment.

Dr Rye Mattick, an orthodontic Consultant at Newcastle Dental Hospital, outlined the aims of the multi-centre randomised clinical trial which where to establish whether Class III protraction facemasks provide effective dental and skeletal change; whether there are any socio- psychological benefits from the treatment and finally whether there are any inadvertent effects on the Temporo-mandibular joint. The inclusion criteria comprised Caucasian patients aged 7 -10 years with a class III malocclusion with 3 or 4 incisors in cross-bite. Syndromic patients and patients with a cleft or a MMPA > 35˚ where excluded from the study. Spencer Nute, a Consultant at Southend University Hospital presented the trial profile. 73 participants were recruited to the study of which 30 went on to be randomly allocated to the intervention group and 33 to the control group.

Those allocated to the intervention group were fitted with a bonded RME which had been made on a simple hinge articulator to ensure occlusal balance, to aid comfort and eating and to ensure the forces were distributed evenly.

Protraction headgear was worn in conjunction with the RME for a minimum of 14 hours a day until class I incisors with no buccal crossbites was achieved.

Nicky Mandall, a consultant and clinical lead at Tameside General Hospital presented the results of the multi-centre trial.

Treatment with protraction headgear took on average 8 ½ months to produce a statistically significant increase in the ANB and Overjet. Despite the intervention group reporting an increase in self esteem this was not of statistical significance and encouragingly there were no adverse effects associated with the temporo-mandibular joint when utilising protraction headgear. The results are encouraging and now we wait with bated breath to hear whether the use of protraction headgear reduces the need for orthognathic surgery.

Following coffee, a second tranche of prizes were awarded by Professor David Bearn. Sheri Seymour and Professor Susan Cunningham from the Eastman Dental Institute, were awarded the Research Protocol Award for their research looking at ‘Parents’ motivation for seeking orthodontic treatment’. Evelyn Lee, also from the Eastman, was awarded the Houston Postgraduate Research Award for her questionnaire based study looking at ‘Psychological effects of altered sensation in post orthognathic patients’.

Neha Passan, from the Royal London, was awarded the BOC Research Poster prize for ‘Assessment of orthodontic borderline treatment need: Two aesthetic indices compared’ Omar Yaqoob was awarded the UTG prize for an excellent presentation on the Use of Clark twin block with/without a labial bow to correct Class II division I malocclusions:an RCT.

Second place was awarded to Ektor Grammatopoulous for a cross-sectional observational study looking at The effects of playing a wind instrument on the occlusion.

Mike Mars was awarded the BOS Distinguished Award for his outstanding contribution to orthodontics, a recognition which was richly deserved.

After which Iain Hathorn, Les Joffe and John Brown were presented with BOS Life Membership awards and the BOS Special Service award was presented to Professor Sue Cunningham, Richard Jones and Alison Newlyn.

The prize session finished with the inauguration of Ray Edler as President of the BOS, a position he will honour following the outgoing of the current President, Liz Devenish in January 2011.

The morning session closed with the prestigious Northcroft Lecture presented by Professor Fraser McDonald.

Despite being head of orthodontics at the Dental Institute, Kings College London, he has found time to publish over 80 papers, 160 abstracts, write three books, supervise a vast number of Master of Science reports and since 1993 he has also been editor of the European Journal of Orthodontics.

His thought-provoking lecture, Where do we go from here? was an apt title for a lecture which outlined the challenges for future training in orthodontics and provision of care in a time of economic uncertainty.

He speculated that TADS will become resorbable, headgear obsolete and diagnostic genetics will form part of our treatment armamentarium as we try to predict those susceptible to root resorption and ectopic canines amongst other things.

Finally, Professor McDonald highlighted the need for more research exploring the psycho-social effects of treatment and, perhaps depressingly, he forewarned of the anticipated rise in annual retention fees and liability insurance.

The afternoon session started with a lecture from Professor Donald Burden, The evidence base for orthognathic surgery.

He presented a recent study with which he has been actively involved that set out to establish the extent of social problems amongst orthognathic patients, whether there is an association between skeletal pattern and psychological status and finally whether there is a need to carry out a psychological screening of potential orthognathic patients prior to commencing treatment.

Interestingly, patients with a skeletal II malocclusion were found to be more anxious, more depressed, and have lower self esteem than all other participants. Perhaps the most interesting and controversial finding was that more control patients (n=5) than orthognathic patients (n=4) required a referral to a psychologist for support based on the subject indicating severe distress.

The study concluded that there is no evidence to justify routine psychological screening.
Dr Emile Rossouw, a renowned international speaker presented experimental and clinical evidence of mini-screw implant anchorage, increasing our understanding in ideal placement and how best to optimise success in his lecture Class II correction: Clinical and research evidence related to orthodontic anchorage.

The penultimate lecture of the day was presented by Dr Jay Bowman, a highly respected orthodontist with a vast amount of experience in mini-screw placement, such that he puts the total number of mini-screws placed by registrants in the BOS TAD audit to shame!

He kindly shared his experiences and knowledge in a thoroughly entertaining talk entitled A spike in the ice: Innovative anchorage concepts with miniscrews.

The scientific programme was brought to a close by an all singing and all dancing lecture by Professor David Bearn, appropriately titled In, out, shake it all about – the BOS Temporary Anchorage Device audit project. Since the launch of the audit in June 2008, 130 centres have registered, with placement of 499 TADs in year 1 and 997 TADs in year 2. The data would suggest that success is associated with longer screws, use of a bur to place a pilot hole, placement of TADS in the maxilla and delayed loading.

Clinicians were encouraged to register with the Audit and update their results regularly, as it will not only benefit all BOS members through provision of more robust data but allow us to try and overtake Dr Jay Bowman in the number of mini-screws placed!
 
Wednesday 22 September
On Wednesday, the Society hosted the second Orthodontic Commissioning Education Day to be held in parallel with the British Orthodontic Conference. It was aimed at individuals and organisations directly and indirectly involved in commissioning NHS orthodontic services. The session was opened by Dr Richard Jones, chairman of the Orthodontic Practice Committee of the BOS with a lecture ‘2011 and beyond: Update on the political challenges ahead’.

The lecture started gently with a brief background to the Primary Dental Services and the inherent problems associated with it, progressing on to the contentious topic of tendering for orthodontic contracts.

Key issues with regards to continuity of care, completion of services should contracts not be re-commissioned, cross border referrals, financial support for providers and the challenges incurred with rising management costs were outlined.

Members were assured that guidelines for PCT’s and providers are on the horizon which will be published and circulated in the New Year in a bid to offer solutions to all the issues discussed.

Sue Gregory, the deputy chief dental officer, outlined the structural changes which are to be imposed following the recently elected coalition government.

Following the proposed abolition of PCTs and SHAs, an autonomous NHS commissioning board is to be created from April 2011 which will be responsible for allocation and accounting of NHS resources. The White Paper, QIPP agenda, the economic climate and the reform of dental contracts all demand greater focus on value for money, both in service quality and cost.

Sohin Shah, commercial lead at the Department of Health and a procurement specialist, illustrated how the procurement process works and how PCT’s evaluate value for money – an insight welcomed by orthodontic providers.

Brian Kelly, a senior orthodontic adviser with the dental reference service outlined the process of monitoring orthodontic contracts, through activity monitoring and quality assurance.

Interestingly, 10% of case starts and 20% of completions are submitted without completion of the clinical data set. He urged orthodontic clinicians to complete the FP17 O correctly, showing examples of how this should be done.

John Milne, Chair of the General Dental Practice Committee and a Dentist with a special interest in orthodontics completed the morning session with a lecture, New contract for dentists – where does orthodontics align itself?

After lunch, Mark Shackell, of the British Dental Association, presented his lecture, Clinical engagement: its role in professional and business life. The aims of the coalition Government with regards to devolution of responsibility to the frontline, clinicians assuming responsibility and accountability and the importance of improving the patient experience were discussed.

Finally, the role of the NHS Commissioning Board, the impact of clinical engagement and the BDA response to the White paper was also outlined.

Following on from this Dr Andrew DiBiase, a consultant orthodontist based at Canterbury in East Kent, presented an excellent talk emphasising the importance of robust referral guidelines in a bid to monitor, direct and improve the patient care pathway.

The BOC conference ended with Dr Richard Jones simplifying the role of the PDS and how it differs from an item of service contract in; PDS Revisited: Exploring the misunderstood nature of PDS.

For more information about events organised by the British Orthodontic Society, visit www.bos.org.uk.


Conference reports were authored by

Jadbinder Seehra, FTTA Orthodontics, Queen Victoria Hospital NHS Foundation Trust /Guy’s & St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust

Nicola Crawford qualified in dentistry at Sheffield in 2000 and began her specialist registrar training in Orthodontics in Sheffield and Chesterfield in 2006. She gained a MClin Dent in 2008 and MOrth in 2009. She is currently an FTTA at Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead and Guys and St. Thomas Hospital.

Natasha Wright qualified in Dentistry at Sheffield in 2002 and following a year in general dental practice and several senior house officer posts in oral and maxillofacial surgery, restorative dentistry and paediatric dentistry, she embarked on her specialist registrar training in orthodontics at the Royal London Dental Hospital in 2006. In 2008 she was awarded an MSc (Merit) and in 2009 MOrth. Currently she is undertaking a FTTA in orthodontics at Guys and St Thomas’s Hospital and Sidcup Hospital.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Dental magazine subscription and seminar offers^

Visit stand G09 at this year’s BDTA Dental Showcase and save 30% on the UK’s leading dental journals.

Delegates who subscribe at Showcase will save money with this exclusive show offer.

Visitors are welcome to join the team at the FMC and Independent Seminars exhibition stand G09 and save money in the process.

The best deals and special offers have been saved especially for this event, so visit stand G09 to see how you can benefit from the very best discounts for the industry’s leading dental journals and seminars.

The special offers include:
• 30% off subscription journals
• £100 off all seminars
• 50% off DVDs.

Visit stand G09 to take advantage of these fantastic bargains – and remember these offers are exclusive to Dental Showcase visitors only and will end after the event, so make sure you don’t miss out.

^1286928000^3284^Dental magazine subscription and se…^Visit stand G09 at this year’s BDTA Dental Showcase and save 30% on the UK’s leading dental journals.Delegates who subscribe at …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Journals.png
Simple cheek swab may detect lung cancer^

Scientists have discovered that a simple swab of the cheek can detect lung cancer in its earliest stages.
 
The inner cheek is swabbed then diffuse light is shined on the cells from the swab.
 
The swab, called partial wave spectroscopis (PWS) microscopy, was able to differentiate between people who had lung cancer and those who didn’t.
 
The test could tell if they had cancer even if they had been lifetime smokers or suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
 
Lead author and physician and researcher, Hemant Roy, of NorthShore University Health Systems and the University of Chicago, said: ‘This study is important because it provides the proof of concept that a minimally intrusive, risk-stratification technique may allow us to tailor screening for lung cancer… This represents a major step forward in translating biomedical optics breakthroughs for personalised screening for lung cancer.’

• SOURCE: Cancer Research, published online 12 October 2010

^1286928000^3285^Simple cheek swab may detect lung c…^Scientists have discovered that a simple swab of the cheek can detect lung cancer in its earliest stages.  The inner cheek is swabbed t…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/lungx.png
Hike in uni fees will impact on dental students^

The Government is considering a hike in university fees following Lord Browne’s review of university finances.

Although it is unclear how much of the review will translate into coalition policy – as many Liberal Democrat MPs signed a pledge not to raise tuition fees – it is a key element of Lord Browne’s recommendations.

Doctors’ leaders have already spoken out to warn ministers that increasing tuition fees could result in medical students facing a debt bill of potentially £100,000 – a financial burden that could discourage many applicants from low and middle income families.

Proposals to allow universities to charge fees up to £12,000 are contained in Lord Browne’s report.

It also recommends that students should pay higher rates of interest on their student loans and an increase in the income level at which these loans are repaid, from £15,000 to £21,000.

The BMA estimates that any further increases in tuition fees could result in a prohibitive level of debt for the next generation of medical students, and this will include those studying dentistry.

Meanwhile, Lord Browne also suggests that new higher education providers should be offered government funding to teach subjects including dentistry.
 
He says existing institutions would face greater competition, including from ‘new providers of higher education’.
 
Such providers ‘will be able to apply for targeted HE Council investment if they offer priority programmes, and will be subject to the same quality requirements as any other provider’.
 
The review defines ‘priority programmes’ as clinical or laboratory-based subjects, including dentistry, medicine, engineering and technology.
 
The document also suggested that, where existing institutions failed, then the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) will ‘explore options such as mergers or takeovers led by other providers’ – potentially opening the door for private firms to take over struggling universities.
 
Such recommendations broadly fit with the direction of Conservative policy.
 
In his speech to the party’s conference last week, universities minister David Willetts spoke favourably about private providers BPP and Kaplan, and said: ‘I am determined to make it easier for other new teaching institutions to challenge existing ones.’

^1286928000^3287^Hike in uni fees will impact on den…^The Government is considering a hike in university fees following Lord Browne’s review of university finances.Although it is unclear how muc…^
Dental Showcase gets off to a rocking start^

Visitors on the first day of the BDTA’s Dental Showcase were kept busy with product offers and promotions and this year’s added attraction of live theatre and presentations.

London’s ExCeL exhibition hall was a hive of activity yesterday (Thursday) which included a jam-packed seminar staged by Denplan that aims to help practices through the Care Quality Commission (CQC) registration process.

Denplan’s chief dental officer Roger Matthews and deputy chief dental Officer Henry Clover addressed the dental professionals in the free seminar entitled, Helping practices with the CQC.

There was also an opportunity to ask questions and get clarification on CQC issues – and there are more seminars today and then tomorrow.

They are free for principals and practice managers and offer one hour’s CPD and are being held in ExCeL’s Northern Gallery Room 8 but you must register in advance by contacting the Denplan Events Team on 0800 169 5697 or emailing [email protected]

They will be held at the following times:
• Today (Friday 15 October) 11am & 2pm
• Tomorrow (Saturday 16 October 11am).

Meanwhile, at the DPAS stand, delegates were invited to sign a petition against the new regulatory layer.

DPAS chairman, Quentin Skinner, used this year’s Dental Showcase to publicise the campaign which is already gaining momentum amongst DPAS client practices, all of whom have received a questionnaire aimed at gauging the level of support in the profession. 

Elsewhere, at stand J14, Software of Excellence was showing off its new interactive patient education tool that helps dental professionals communicate more effectively with patients on a range of treatment options, such as oral health, implants, periodontal disease, orthodontics and much more.

For a limited period, SoE is giving away a fantastic new Apple iPad, complete with guru iPad App, with every new Guru order.

On stand K14, delegates were invited to see the complete range of ExamVision loupes and lights including the recently launched ExamVision 5.0x high magnification loupe.

All ExamVision loupes provide unbeatable magnification with an ocular that is half the length of some other manufacturers.

Free lectures included a BACD-sponsored The future of dentistry – should you be scared? presented by James Goolnik and a complimentary seminar on Radiography and radiation protection hosted by the Health Protection Agency.

Fridays can be the busiest day at Showcase, so if you’re going be sure to allow enough time around the many stands.

With exhibitors displaying the latest products, explaining about new time and cost-saving services and demonstrating the most up-to-date technologies, visitors can gain a wide range of knowledge, some of which will earn them verifiable CPD hours.

To round off the day, BDPMA members are invited to join Seema Sharma (of Slumdog Secret Millionaire fame) and members of the BDPMA team for drinks and canapés at Seema’s Docklands practice.

And finally, don’t forget to visit Visit stand G09 to save 30% on the UK’s leading dental journals.

Delegates who subscribe at Showcase will save money with this exclusive show offer.

Visitors are welcome to join the team at the FMC and Independent Seminars exhibition stand and save money in the process.

The best deals and special offers have been saved especially for this event, so visit stand G09 to see how you can benefit from the very best discounts for the industry’s leading dental journals and seminars.

The special offers include:
• 30% off subscription journals
• £100 off all seminars
• 50% off DVDs.

Visit stand G09 to take advantage of these fantastic bargains – and remember these offers are exclusive to Dental Showcase visitors only and will end after the event, so make sure you don’t miss out.

^1287100800^3288^Dental Showcase gets off to a rocki…^Visitors on the first day of the BDTA’s Dental Showcase were kept busy with product offers and promotions and this year’s added attraction o…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/working-in-harmony.png
Westminster debates new dental contract^

Professor Jimmy Steele, the BDA’s Susie Sanderson and John Milne and deputy chief dental officer Susie Sanderson will be among the dental leaders at a debate next month to discuss the new NHS dental contract.

The Westminster health forum keynote seminar, The future of dentistry – taking forward system reform and moving towards a new dental contract will be staged on 16 November at the
Harvey Goodwin Suite, Church House Conference Centre, Dean’s Yard, Westminster, London SW1P 3NZ.
 
This event is CPD certified and will focus on the future of dentistry, including system reform and prospects for the new dental contract.
 
The discussion aims to reflect plans for dentistry in the coalition government’s White Paper Equity and excellence: Liberating the NHS.

The seminar follows the announcement that, following consultation and piloting, a new dental contract will be introduced – focused on achieving good dental health and increasing access to NHS dentistry, with an additional emphasis on the oral health of schoolchildren.
 
Key discussion points:
• The ongoing work of the Steele Implementation Programme with an appraisal from Professor Jimmy Steele; how work is being tied in with wider dental policy developments and how this will impact on the proposals in the White Paper
• Early assessment of the pilots launched following the publication of the Steele Review, and implications for future policy
• The BDA view on the main challenges ahead for dentistry – from Dr Susie Sanderson
• What more can be done to tackle inequalities in dental care and improve commissioning of services
• The next steps for NHS dentistry – from Dr Sue Gregory.
 
Keynote speakers:
Sue Gregory, deputy chief dental officer, Department of Health
John Milne, chair, general dental practice committee, BDA
Susie Sanderson, chair of the executive board, BDA
Professor Jimmy Steele, head of school and chair of oral health services research, Newcastle University.
 
Further confirmed speakers:
Justin Ash, chief executive, Oasis Healthcare
Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive, British Dental Health Foundation
Eileen Lock, regional director for London, Harmoni
Rebecca Owen-Evans, Policy Advisor, Which?
Eric Rooney, consultant, dental public health, Cumbria and Lancashire PCTs
Dr Mike Warburton, national director for Dental and GP Access, Department of Health
Derek Watson, chief executive officer, Dental Practitioners Association
 
Chairs: Lord Colwyn and Baroness Gardner of Parkes, executive officer, all-party parliamentary group on primary care and public health.
 
An online booking form is at www.westminsterforumprojects.co.uk/forums/book_event.php?eid=151&mo=DM4.
 
Options and charges are as follows:
Places at The future of dentistry – taking forward system reform and moving towards a new dental contract (including refreshments and PDF copy of the transcripts) are £190 plus VAT (£223.25);
• Concessionary rate places for small charities, unfunded individuals and those in similar circumstances are £80 plus VAT (£94).

Please be sure to apply for this at the time of booking.
 

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Dentists refused CQC delay^

A formal request to postpone the registration of dental practices with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has been refused by the Department of Health (DH).

The DH confirmed yesterday (14 October) that it has no intention of changing the timetable for CQC registration.

Earlier in the week, John Milne, Chair of the General Dental Practice Committee at the British Dental Association (BDA), wrote to the Chief Dental Officer reiterating the profession’s strong feelings about CQC registration and requesting that the implementation date be postponed.

The letter at www.bda.org/docs/request-for-cqc-postponement.pdf called for the registration of dental practices to be properly assessed and an efficient process established.

The request followed a recent meeting between Dr Milne and BDA executive board chair Dr Susie Sanderson and CQC chief executive Cynthia Bower at which the profession’s many concerns were articulated once again.

Following that meeting, the CQC announced that it is quadrupling the number of crown post offices able to verify practitioners’ CRB checks.

^1287100800^3290^Dentists refused CQC delay^A formal request to postpone the registration of dental practices with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has been refused by the Department …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/redcross.png
Girl sends tooth fairy money to Prime Minister^

A girl of six from Salford wrote to the Prime Minister offering to give him the £1 she received from the tooth fairy to help pay off the national debt.

Niamh Riley, a pupil at Moorfield school in Irlam, told David Cameron it was ‘to pay for lots of jobs’.

Mr Cameron mentioned the offer in his conference speech on Wednesday, saying to the Chancellor George Osborne ‘there we are George, nearly there’.

However, he sent the pound coin back and told Niamh to treat herself.

Or she could ‘save it for a rainy day’, he said.

^1287100800^3291^Girl sends tooth fairy money to Pri…^A girl of six from Salford wrote to the Prime Minister offering to give him the £1 she received from the tooth fairy to help pay off t…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/toothfairy.png
Girl sends tooth fairy money to Prime Minister^

A girl of six from Salford wrote to the Prime Minister offering to give him the £1 she received from the tooth fairy to help pay off the national debt.

Niamh Riley, a pupil at Moorfield school in Irlam, told David Cameron it was ‘to pay for lots of jobs’.

Mr Cameron mentioned the offer in his conference speech on Wednesday, saying to the Chancellor George Osborne ‘there we are George, nearly there’.

However, he sent the pound coin back and told Niamh to treat herself.

Or she could ‘save it for a rainy day’, he said.

^1287100800^3292^Girl sends tooth fairy money to Pri…^A girl of six from Salford wrote to the Prime Minister offering to give him the £1 she received from the tooth fairy to help pay off t…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/toothfairy.png
CPD certificate for Dental Showcase ^

To download your CPD certificate for the CPD activities relating to BDTA Dental Showcase 2010 and to answer the Show Guide questions visit www.dentalshowcase.com/CPDcertificate from 25 October 2010. 
 
If you want verifiable CPD for answering the questions relating to the articles in the guide, you will be able to click on the appropriate link to do so.

Each participant will be required to achieve a 50% pass mark in each section to achieve the three hours of verifiable CPD.
 
If you have any queries please contact British Dental Trade Association by e-mail on [email protected] or telephone 01494 782873.

^1287446400^3293^CPD certificate for Dental Showcase…^To download your CPD certificate for the CPD activities relating to BDTA Dental Showcase 2010 and to answer the Show Guide questions visit w…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Showcase-logo.png
Allow HIV dentists to practise, government told^

A leading indemnity provider for dentists is demanding the Department of Health withdraw the current rule that stops HIV positive members of the dental team treating patients.
 
The rule exists in spite of evidence that there is no risk of transmission.

A spokesperson for Dental Protection, the UK indemnity providers, says: ‘It is 20 years since the draconian rules were introduced preventing dentists (and other healthcare professionals) from providing treatment to patients.
 
‘Initially introduced as a precautionary measure soon after the mysterious case of Dr Acer, a dentist in the USA who was thought to have infected six patients with the AIDS virus, there has never been any other recorded transmission of the disease in a dental setting.’

Meanwhile many UK dentists – along with dental hygienists and therapists – have lost their livelihood because they have been forced to stop working in their chosen profession.
 
Dental Protection continues: ‘On being given their own diagnosis they were told to “clear their desk” with immediate effect.’

Anti-retroviral medication can now effectively control HIV, so that patients with HIV display levels of the infective particle in their blood which are too low even to measure.
 
This, combined with the high levels of infection control that are demanded of the profession, means that much of Europe along with countries like Australia and America have removed this outdated restriction for dentistry.

The Beijing Declaration from the 6th World Workshop on Oral Health and Disease in AIDS in April 2009 highlighted the outdated stance currently adopted by the Department of Health.
 
Failure to revise its guidance in the light of the latest consensus of evidence-based opinion leaves the Department open to accusations of discrimination.

In calling for greater fairness and a more consistent application of the evidence, Kevin Lewis, director of Dental Protection, says: ‘Dental Protection has championed the cause of HIV-infected dental health professionals for more than a decade in several parts of the world and will continue to take action against this kind of unfair and discriminatory treatment of its members.

‘The international evidence base is overwhelming and the Beijing Declaration unequivocal in confirming that HIV infected dentists can continue to practise safely with no risk to patients, subject only to some very clear and manageable criteria being met. 
 
‘In every other area of professional activity, dental health professionals are directed to follow the evidence base, but HIV has for too long remained a singular exception – during which time careers have been destroyed, lives have been devastated and patients have been deprived access to safe dentists.’

He continues: ‘The time has come to acknowledge the evidence and stop running scared of ill-informed public perception and media scaremongering.  It seems to be forgotten that infected dental health professionals are also patients themselves and they should they be treated no less fairly than other patients. The sound of foot-dragging has been deafening and some immediate action needs to be taken to bring the UK guidance out of the previous century.’

^1287446400^3294^Allow HIV dentists to practise, gov…^A leading indemnity provider for dentists is demanding the Department of Health withdraw the current rule that stops HIV positive members of…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/HIV-ribbon.png
Nuclear expertise used in dental implants^

Former Russian and US weapons scientists have developed nanotitanium, a super metal suitable for dental implants.

The new, stronger alloy used in the dental implant allows it to bond more quickly to human bone.

Created under a three-year partnership between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), several Russian institutes and New Mexico-based Manhattan Scientifics, the new implant material is reliable and long-lasting, and should result in faster post-surgery healing.
 
It is the first dental implant made with nanotitanium that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

nanotitanium

The nanotitatium implants

Nanotitanium, also known as titanium ‘on steroids’, is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) programme, which helps to advance the expertise of former weapons of mass destruction personnel in the development of civil-use technologies.

Under the programme, partners provide financial or in-kind contributions equal in value to the funds NNSA commits to each project.

Manhattan Scientifics owns the US licence to a family of patents that will enable the manufacture and marketing of super strong, ultra light-weight ‘nanostructured’ metals that have been developed.

^1287446400^3295^Nuclear expertise used in dental im…^Former Russian and US weapons scientists have developed nanotitanium, a super metal suitable for dental implants.The new, stronger alloy use…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/atom-tooth.jpg
No need to dread endo, dentists told^

D2D Endo is announcing new autumn dates for its highly-regarded Dread Endo? training days, run by respected endodontists, which are aimed at GDPs looking to update and improve their endodontic skills.

The hands-on nationwide training sessions are run by d2d’s founders, the highly experienced Jason Bedford and Charlie Nicholas, and provide dentists with 6 hours of verifiable CPD.

New for autumn 2010 is the opportunity for delegates to take away an S5 cordless motor to trial in their own practices.

The new S5 Cordless Endo Motor from Sendoline has been developed for use with the S5 rotary file system.

Its five torque settings are tailored to the specific requirements of each of the files in the S5 series.

You also benefit from the security of a visible warning light that will indicate when the file is close to reaching the pre-set torque limit at which point the auto-reverse function will activate.

Attendees at the Dread Endo courses will be encouraged to trial the S5 Motor, putting into practice the techniques they’ve learned during the course, with the opportunity of purchasing the motor at a discounted price at the end of the trial.

The new autumn 2010 Dread Endo courses cover modern concepts in endo, root canal shaping, canal disinfection, contemporary obturation techniques and easy techniques for rubber dam.

D2D Endo aims to provide a mixture of interesting and entertaining lectures, hands-on experience as well as helpful tips and tricks gained from years of endodontic practice.  The courses cost £195 + VAT for a full-day session, and include a three course lunch.

NEW 2010/2011 training dates are:
Friday 29 October 29: Marriott Bristol
Friday 5 November: Huntingdon
Friday 26 November: Oxford
Friday 3 December: London
Friday 10 December: Sheffield
Friday 7 January: Manchester
Friday 14 January: Birmingham
Friday 21 January: Cardiff
Friday 4 February: Liverpool

Dentists can reserve a place by calling 01332 205973.


 width=370 height=250 /></p>
<p>
<p>Since it was founded in 2007, D2D Endo has rapidly grown to become one of the largest suppliers of endodontic equipment and training in the UK. To date, Charlie and Jason have trained over 1,200 dentists on their courses, with extremely positive feedback from every session. </p>
<p>‘Our hands-on training courses are designed to show dentists how to make Endo less of a chore while bringing them up-to-date on the latest advances in this specialist area,’ says Jason Bedford, co-founder of D2D Endo.</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<p>‘From what we’ve seen and from the feedback we’ve received, the training days can greatly improve a GDP’s endo techniques, enabling them to provide truly enhanced services for their patients and practices.’</p>
<p>^1287446400^3297^No need to dread endo, dentists tol…^D2D Endo is announcing new autumn dates for its highly-regarded Dread Endo? training days, run by respected endodontists, which are aimed at…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/D2DENDO.png<br />
Kanye West replaces bottom teeth with diamonds^
<p>Rapper Kanye West showed off some sparkling diamond and gold implants to US chat show host Ellen DeGeneres this week.</p>
<p>
<p>He says: ‘I just thought that diamonds were cooler. It’s really my real teeth. I replaced my bottom row of teeth. I guess there’s just certain things that rock stars are supposed to do.’</p>
<p>
<p>The show was Kanye’s first TV interview since he famously interrupted Taylor Swift’s acceptance speech at the 2009 MTV VMAs. </p>
<p>
<p>To see the interview, click <a href=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rrvy5Ew6oQ&feature=player_embedded#!>here</a></p>
<p>^1287532800^3301^Kanye West replaces bottom teeth wi…^Rapper Kanye West showed off some sparkling diamond and gold implants to US chat show host Ellen DeGeneres this week.He says: ‘I just though…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Kanye.png<br />
Dental practices hit one million text messages^
<p>Customers of Software of Excellence hit a memorable milestone in September when they collectively sent one million text messages to patients in a single month.<br /> <br />With an estimated 51 million mobile phones currently in use in the UK – and the increasing trend to text instead of talk – dental practices are quickly realising that mobile technology is a fast and effective way to send recalls, appointment reminders and other practice information. <br /> <br />Text message communication has numerous benefits over traditional methods and is being widely adopted, for example a text leaves the practice contact number on the user’s phone enabling them to call back if required, a text is more effective than making a phone call in terms of response rates and texts are in general less than a fifth of the cost of sending a letter.</p>
<p>
<p>With all these advantages it is easy to see how text messaging technology can improve recall effectiveness and have a positive impact on the overall efficiency of a practice.<br /> <br />Teresa Biggs is practice manager of Lighthouse Dental Practice, Ipswich, and has only recently adopted text messaging technology.</p>
<p>
<p>She says: ‘We send out text reminders 48 hours before the patient’s appointment, giving them time to cancel or reschedule if need be, consequently we save time and fees when compared with previous occasions when cancellations were made on the morning of the appointment. The result: a 50% reduction in no-shows!’  <br /> <br />Software of Excellence customers can use Recall Manager to automatically schedule text reminders to patients and EXACT Version 10 includes the ability to see whether text messages have been delivered, enabling you to monitor the delivery status of each message.</p>
<p>
<p>Default messages can also be set up for appointment recalls and missed appointments, helping to reduce ‘failed to attends’ by up to 50% and increasing successful patient recall. <br /> <br />Greg Clay, sales and marketing director of Software of Excellence is delighted to have hit the one million mark.</p>
<p>
<p>He says: ‘It’s great to see practices taking advantage of the benefits of text messaging and we’re pleased that Software of Excellence is at the forefront of developing a whole range of practice management systems and business services such as THRIVE, that save money, increase efficiency and enhance communication.’</p>
<hr />
<p>Don’t let your patients miss an appointment!</p>
<p>
<p>Call 0845 345 5767 or visit <a href=http://www.soeidental.com>www.soeidental.com</a> and find out more about how your practice can harness texting technology!</p>
<p>^1287532800^3300^Dental practices hit one million te…^Customers of Software of Excellence hit a memorable milestone in September when they collectively sent one million text messages to patients…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/mob-funky.png<br />
Clark Dental impresses delegates at Showcase^
<p>Exhibiting their extensive array of high-end equipment and stylish surgery design solutions at the 2010 BDTA Dental Showcase, was Clark Dental, who demonstrated why they are one of the leading dental specialists in the UK.</p>
<p>
<p>In keeping with this year’s theme of innovation and integration, Clark’s display of digital imaging products, ranging from the very latest Schick Digital Imaging System, including the revolutionary CDRElite intraoral sensor with its one-step user-replacable cable, right through to the ergonomic Galileos Compact 3D diagnostic system from Sirona, were great examples.</p>
<p>
<p>They all offered unsurpassed image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose.</p>
<p>
<p>Delegates were also impressed with the multiplicity of features offered by the latest chairs from A-Dec, Stern Weber and Anthos, while the Apex and Edarredo cabinetry ranges on show presented both traditional and modern practice storage alternatives to satisfy all tastes.</p>
<p>
<p>Thanks to Clark’s HTM 01-05 display, dentists concerned about infection control compliance were able to see how the versatile Apex range could be adapted to offer bespoke sterilisation room solutions that meet best practice guidelines.</p>
<p>
<p>Delegates were also impressed by the Aribex NOMAD® Pro, the revolutionary hand-held intraoral x-ray system, providing a low radiation dose whilst also offering flexibility and intuitive operation.    Also on show was the Dentaloscope 2D, combining outstanding ergonomics with superb microscopic images, delivered via the extra-oral Video Magnification System, as well as the CarieScan PRO, a hand-held monitor capable of detecting carious teeth with incredible accuracy.</p>
<p>
<p>Sky Factory’s innovative range of virtual skylights and windows, available exclusively from Clark, also proved popular, offering a fresh way to transform dental interiors while calming patients and inspiring staff.    Dentists committed to the future of their practice enjoyed Clark Dental’s exhibits, and gained important information from its knowledgeable and expert team.</p>
<p>

<p>
<hr />
<p><span class=blue_smheadfont>For more information call Clark Dental on 01268 733 146 (Essex) or 01270 613 750 (Cheshire) Email enquiries@clarkdental.co.uk or sales@clarkdental.co.uk</span></p>
<p>^1287532800^3299^Clark Dental impresses delegates at…^Exhibiting their extensive array of high-end equipment and stylish surgery design solutions at the 2010 BDTA Dental Showcase, was Clark Dent…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Clark-1.png<br />
Extra strong Mint interest at Dental Showcase ^
<p>Mint, which was established by Kate Adam and Alex Nicolaou to provide a marketing and business development service to dental practices, made a highly successful debut at the BDTA Dental Showcase last week.</p>
<p>
<p>Marketing director, Kate Adam, says: ‘We put a lot of effort into the design of the stand to highlight the Mint brand and our range of services. We also had some attractive offers such as a 17.5% discount on Mint Magic – one-day full examination of a dental practice which results in a clear plan of action to attract high value patients.’</p>
<p>
<p>Mint also offered discount to British Dental Practice Managers’ Association members on its one-day hands on workshop for practice managers and this resulted in considerable interest and a number of bookings.</p>
<p>
<p>Brand director, Alex Nicolaou, says: ‘We shared the stand with Dental Design & Planning Consultants (DDPC) so dentists who were refurbishing, relocating or expanding  were able to get interior design and marketing advice all from our stand.’</p>
<p>
<p>Mint Alliance was formally launched at Dental Showcase. This is a network of business professionals supplying the dental profession. The members are Kate Adam and Alex Nicolaou (Mint), Gary Bettis (DDPC), Dhru Shah (Dentinal Tubules), Mark Oborn (social media marketing), Jem Patel (JSP Media Group), James Claret (the Amazing Support Company offering IT services) and Kevin Rose (business coach).</p>
<p>
<p>Kate Adam says: ‘Mint Alliance means that each of us can recommend and work with experts with whom we have strong working relationships to provide a comprehensive service to dental practices.</p>
<p>
<p>‘The concept of a ‘one stop shop’ is not new but we believe this is the first time its been applied in this way for the dentistry industry. We plan to expand the alliance over the coming months.’</p>
<p>
<p>At Dental Showcase, a number of booking were taken for the Mint Expert Seminar to be held in Hertfordshire on 17 December.</p>
<p>
<p>At the one-day event, Mint Alliance members will each share their expertise and pass on practical advice for developing a dental practice. Places are still available and more information is available from <a href=http://www.mint-tastic.co.uk>www.mint-tastic.co.uk</a>.</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
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‘MC Hammer’ dancers entertain at Showcase^
<p>Schülke’s stand at Dental Showcase 2010 Exhibition was a hive of activity with delegates flocking to join in the fun and show off their moves alongside a professional dance troupe to the sounds of MC Hammer.<br /> <br />To celebrate the success of the company’s popular line of touch-free decontamination systems with the strapline, ‘You can’t touch this’, dancers entertained visitors to MC’s famous dance routine plus giving the lucky few a chance to learn the flamboyant dance techniques with prizes going to the delegates who performed best. <br /> <br />The team at Schülke also used the opportunity to raise awareness of their recently launched comparison website, <a href=http://www.comparethemikrozid.com>www.comparethemikrozid.com</a>, where their mascot Mike explained to delegates whether or not their practice’s surface cleaner and disinfectant was suitable for their needs.</p>
<p>
<p>Attendees also enjoyed using Mike to shoot down bugs in Schülke’s computer game, Mikrozid mayhem!<br /> <br />Mike became a familiar face at the event as he wandered around the exhibition hall, encouraging visitors to keep their surgery surfaces clean.<br /> <br />Schülke, industry leaders in cross infection control in the clinical environment, produce a wide range of products for hand hygiene and instrument decontamination to alcohol-free surface cleaners and disinfectants. <br /> <br />More information on infection control products is available from schülke by calling 0114 254 3500 or by visiting <a href=http://www.s4dental.com>www.s4dental.com</a> or visit <a href=http://twitter.com/mikemikrozid>http://twitter.com/mikemikrozid</a>.</p>
<p>^1287532800^3303^’MC Hammer’ dancers entertain at Sh…^Schülke’s stand at Dental Showcase 2010 Exhibition was a hive of activity with delegates flocking to join in the fun and show off…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/mikerun.png<br />
Do your patients love their toothbrush?^
<p>Philips is challenging dental professionals with the question ‘Do your patients love their toothbrush?’</p>
<p>
<p>If they are using a manual brush, the answer is probably a resounding ‘no’.</p>
<p>
<p>If proof were needed that encouraging patients to switch from a manual toothbrush to a Philips Sonicare power toothbrush can significantly improve their oral health, a set of new clinical studies show even more reasons.</p>
<p>
<p>The data from the three studies reinforces the efficacy of using a Philips Sonicare power toothbrush to clean teeth and reduce gingivitis.<br /> <br />An important new oral health study conducted at the University of North Carolina, USA, evaluated the effects of Sonicare FlexCare+ on patients with mild, moderate and severe periodontitis.</p>
<p>
<p>Results showed that Sonicare FlexCare+ improved gum tissue condition to help promote the longevity and health of existing teeth, prevent rapid deterioration of disease and maintain integrity of teeth and gums in this patient population.</p>
<p>
<p>The study, which sampled almost 100 people, also reinforced the benefits of Sonicare FlexCare+ to significantly reduce plaque, gingival inflammation, and gingival bleeding within four weeks, when compared with a manual toothbrush [1]. <br /> <br /><strong>An easy switch</strong><br />Philips Sonicare’s specially designed toothbrushes are easy to manoeuvre and their specially designed brush heads help patients clean the hard to reach areas of the mouth.</p>
<p>
<p>A fact which is confirmed in a separate study, conducted among DPs from the UK, Netherlands and Denmark which showed that more than 75% of dental professionals are highly satisfied with the cleaning performance and manoeuvrability of the compact ProResults brush head, especially in the posterior and hard to reach areas of the mouth [2].  <br /> <br />A  third new study [in vitro tooth-cleaning efficacy of electric toothbrushes around brackets, an independent study conducted at the University of Zurich] evaluated the cleaning efficacy of brush heads on orthodontic attachments, using a Sonicare power toothbrush with a compact or standard ProResults brush head provided superior results.</p>
<p>
<p>Compared with other power toothbrushes, including the Oral-B Professional Care 9500, the ProResults and standard brush heads were significantly better at removing plaque, with an 81.7 and 80.8% reduction, respectively [3].  </p>
<p>Dr Joerg Strate, vice president of clinical and scientific affairs for Philips Oral Healthcare, says: ‘As you can imagine, the requirements that we have to address with modern oral care products have drastically changed over the past couple of years. Today, it is important that beyond plaque removal, a property that we have confirmed many times for Sonicare toothbrushes, these products help patients to successfully address their oral care needs even if they are suffering from a compromised situation or particular treatment conditions.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Our portfolio of clinical trials tries to validate that Sonicare toothbrushes are designed to fulfil these requirements.’</p>
<p>Amarjit Gill adds: ‘Like many of my colleagues, I am a dental professional who believes in preventive dentistry and wanting to ensure my patients need as little intervention as possible.</p>
<p>
<p>‘By developing products such as Sonicare, Philips has shown a profound understanding of the cause and effect of periodontal disease and developed tools which dental professionals such as myself can use and recommend to help bring about significant improvements in the oral health of our patients.’ <br /> <br />‘Patients are always heartened by the tangible results they can achieve with Sonicare which we chart on subsequent appointments and anything which makes me a hero in their eyes is a good thing in my books!’<br /> <br />The Philips Sonicare brand is a leader in oral health care, and is backed by more than 175 publications and abstracts representing clinical and laboratory studies conducted at more than 50 universities and research institutes worldwide.</p>
<p>
<p>Philips Sonicare power toothbrushes are proven to promote and improve oral health, from reducing plaque to improving overall gum health.  They have also demonstrated the ability to increase patient compliance by promoting a consistent oral health and hygiene regime between dental appointments.  As a result Philips Sonicare is the number one sonic toothbrush brand recommended by dental professionals for adults worldwide.<br /> <br />For more information about these and other clinical studies, please visit <a href=http://www.sonicare.co.uk/dp>www.sonicare.co.uk/dp</a>.</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<hr />
<p>
<p><strong>References</strong></p>
<p>[1] Aspiras M, Offenbacher s, Barros S, de Jager M. Changes in clinical indices in experimentally induced gingivitis in three periodontitis patient groups: effects of Sonicare FlexCare and a manual toothbrush. In vivo study. Data on file 2010.  </p>
<p>[2] Jenkins W, Defenbaugh J, Master A, Wei J. In-home use test by dental professionals evaluating the FlexCare+ with ProResults Compact brush head and Oral-B Triumph with Floss Action brush head. Data on file, 2010. </p>
<p>[3] Schätzle M, Sener B, Schmidlin P, Imfeld T, Atti T. In vitro tooth-cleaning efficacy of electric toothbrushes around brackets. Eur J Orthod, Advance Access published on June 15, 2010; doi:10.1093/ejo/cjp166</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
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Invasive dentistry can risk heart, claims study^
<p>Invasive dental procedures designed to treat gum inflammation may raise the risk for heart attack and stroke, a new study claims.<br /> <br />But the increase appears to be slight and short-term, the study team suggested.<br /> <br />Study co-author Liam Smeeth, a professor of clinical epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, says: ‘I don’t want to downplay this entirely, because we saw a genuine rise in cardiovascular risk in the period just after dental work was done among patients undergoing invasive treatment. But the overall risk is quite small and endures for only a very brief period.’<br /> <br />Professor Smeeth and his colleagues published their findings in the October 19 issue of the <em>Annals of Internal Medicine</em>.<br /> <br />Previous research has linked common and chronic low-grade dental infections to inflammatory processes that elevate the risk for strokes and heart attacks, the authors pointed out.<br /> <br />But whether treatment for those infections raises a similar risk had not been explored, said the authors who set out to study the potential link between the two.<br /> <br />The team analysed US Medicaid records for nearly 1,200 patients who had undergone invasive dental treatments and had also experienced a stroke or a heart attack between 2002 and 2006.<br /> <br />The patients’ median age was 67, and invasive dental procedures were characterised as those with the potential to cause an inflammatory response, such as periodontal therapy and tooth extractions.<br /> <br />Nearly three-quarters of the patients had undergone a single dental procedure, nearly all of them (89%) tooth extractions. <br /> <br />About one-quarter had had two to four dental treatments, with 57 days, on average, between each procedure.<br /> <br />About 4% of the patients died during hospitalisation.<br /> <br />Even after taking into consideration a history of diabetes, high blood pressure and/or coronary heart disease, the team observed a significant but slight increase in heart-related events during the month following a dental treatment, primarily because of an apparent short-term rise in heart attack risk.</p>
<p>
<p>Stroke risk appeared to rise less significantly than heart attack risk.<br /> <br />However, no patient suffered a cardiovascular event on the day of treatment, and the apparent increased risk for heart problems dissipated within six months, the researchers noted.<br /> <br />Such transient cardiovascular concerns are generally minimal, do not outweigh the long-term cardiovascular benefits of invasive dental treatment, and should not deter patients from getting the dental care they need, the authors concluded.</p>
<p>
<p>In an editorial in the same journal, Dr Howard Weitz, of the Jefferson Heart Institute, and Dr Geno Merli of the Jefferson Vascular Center, both in Philadelphia, noted it is too early to say that routine dental care should be altered in any way based on the current findings.</p>
<p>^1287532800^3305^Invasive dentistry can risk heart, …^Invasive dental procedures designed to treat gum inflammation may raise the risk for heart attack and stroke, a new study claims. But t…^<br />
New dental regulator boss takes office^
<p>The UK’s dental regulator the General Dental Council (GDC) has today welcomed its new chief executive and registrar Evlynne Gilvarry.<br /> <br />Evlynne is joining the GDC from the General Osteopathic Council (GOsC), the statutory regulator of osteopathy in the UK, where she’d worked as chief executive and registrar since November 2007.</p>
<p>
<p>Previously she worked in various senior policy and management roles at the Law Society, the regulator and professional body for solicitors in England and Wales.</p>
<p>
<p>She is a qualified lawyer and mediator.</p>
<p>^1287532800^3306^New dental regulator boss takes off…^The UK’s dental regulator the General Dental Council (GDC) has today welcomed its new chief executive and registrar Evlynne Gilvarry.&…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/EGilvarry.png<br />
 FGDP(UK) backs ‘Dr’ title for dentists^
<p>The Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) is giving its support to the move to allow dentists to call themselves ‘Dr’.</p>
<p>The FGDP(UK) has responded to the General Dental Council’s consultation on the Principles of Ethical Advertising and highlighted the acceptance of the title across Europe and the USA, and a precedence for its use already established in the UK.</p>
<p>It also supports the GDC’s aim to provide clear guidance to registrants so that patients are able to make informed choices about their treatment and dental care provider. </p>
<p>A spokesperson says: ‘We would support the view that the title can offer reassurance to patients, indicating that a professional has completed an appropriate and rigorous programme of education and training, although we acknowledge that a lack of consistency in the title’s use may lead to a potential for confusion among patients.’</p>
<p>The FGDP(UK) has some serious concerns around the presentation of additional qualifications by practitioners, and has reiterated its proposal for a framework to recognise a practitioner’s level of experience by qualification set out in the FGDP(UK)’s response to the GDC consultation on additional qualifications in 2008.</p>
<p>Russ Ladwa, Dean of the Faculty says: ‘While the FGDP(UK) supports an approach that stresses a professional responsibility to be honest in the presentation of skills and qualifications, the absence of a system to recognise the attainment of additional qualifications creates a potential for patients to be mislead on the extent and nature of additional training.’ </p>
<p>The Faculty’s response to the consultation also urges that practitioners should include specific information on additional training on their practice website, including links to education providers’ websites.</p>
<p>The FGDP(UK)’s Lay Advisory Group has also responded to the consultation; its views appear as an annex to the Faculty’s response document.</p>
<p>^1287532800^3307^ FGDP(UK) backs ‘Dr’ title for dent…^The Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) is giving its support to the move to allow dentists to call themselves ‘Dr’.The FGDP(UK) has res…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/dentistsign.png<br />
Chilean miners’ gum disease prompts oral health warning  ^
<p>Gum disease suffered by the rescued Chilean miners has demonstrated the importance of proper dental healthcare, warn oral care experts.</p>
<p>
<p>None of the 33 trapped miners was able brush his teeth during the first 17 days of their underground ordeal – resulting in gum disease for a number of the men.</p>
<p>
<p>‘The world has been transfixed by the plight of the 33 Chilean miners trapped nearly half a mile underground since August 5 and it was heartening to witness their rescue,’ said a spokesperson for oral healthcare products Eludril and Elgydium.</p>
<p>
<p>‘It is anticipated that all 33 will make a full recovery but living in a tunnel for nearly 10 weeks has obviously taken its toll on their physical and mental health.</p>
<p>
<p>‘One of the many health problems they now face is that of gum disease.’</p>
<p>
<p>None of the 33 miners had been unable to brush their teeth until rescuers were able to get much needed supplies to them via a five-inch diameter connecting hole drilled from the surface.</p>
<p>
<p>Other risk factors will also have had an impact on the miners’ oral health:<br />• Poor nutrition<br />• Hormonal changes due to stress<br />• Cigarettes supplied to some miners to relieve their stress and boredom.</p>
<p>
<p>The miners are now receiving full medical attention. One of the first priorities has been a full dental check-up and the removal of plaque to help restore the health of their gums.</p>
<p>
<p>‘This is doubly important as it will not only reduce sensitivity and pain locally but also avoid the long-term health issues associated with poor oral hygiene,’ said the Eludril and Elgydium spokesperson.</p>
<p>
<p>‘No-one would wish to experience the physical and emotional trauma the miners faced during their terrible ordeal.</p>
<p>
<p>‘But it does remind us how quickly gum disease can develop and the importance of regular and effective brushing to remove plaque.</p>
<p>
<p>‘It is also important to remember that the first signs of gum disease can be easily treated if caught early and need not result in the loss of teeth.’</p>
<p>
<p>Look out for the following gum disease symptoms:</p>
<p>
<p>• Sore gums or swollen gums can be early indicators of gum disease (often known as gingivitis)  <br />• Bleeding gums, ironically a problem associated often with brushing the teeth, the very action that should be protecting teeth and gums <br />• Receding gums, a sign of serious gum disease left untreated for some time.</p>
<p>
<p>As receding gums shrink back they reveal more of the root of the tooth – often leading to increased sensitivity and pain.</p>
<p>
<p>Worse than that, a receding gum line will not hold teeth in place as firmly.</p>
<p>
<p>They can gradually loosen, move and ultimately either fall out or have to be extracted.    Earlier this year a new Scottish health study also linked gum disease with heart disease.</p>
<p>
<p>People who fail to brush their teeth twice a day run the risk of cardiovascular problems.</p>
<p>
<p>Quick, easy and effective treatments are available for those who have detected the early signs of gum disease.</p>
<p>
<p>Experts from Eludril and Elgydium recommend visiting a dentist and asking about the best gingivitis treatment.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Chances are they will recommend a Chlorhexidine mouthwash.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Chlorhexidine is an antibacterial ingredient proven to inhibit the harmful bacteria that cause and worsen gum disease.’</p>
<p>
<p>Eludril mouthwash – which contains Chlorhexidine – is an antibacterial and analgesic solution used to prevent and treat gum disease by stopping the build-up of bacteria.</p>
<p>
<p>Choosing the right toothpaste is just as important. The Elgydium toothpaste range includes a regular Anti-Plaque paste with Chlorhexidine to help prevent dental plaque and tartar build-up – the major causes of tooth decay and gum disease.</p>
<p>
<p>For further information about protecting teeth against gum disease, please contact Nikki Pounds on +44 (0)1202 780558, nikki.pounds@ceutahealthcare.com or visit <a href=http://www.gumproblems.co.uk>www.gumproblems.co.uk</a></p>
<p>^1287532800^3308^Chilean miners’ gum disease promp…^Gum disease suffered by the rescued Chilean miners has demonstrated the importance of proper dental healthcare, warn oral care experts.None …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Chilean.png<br />
Avoid complaints escalating, dentists warned^
<p>A government review of complaint handling by the NHS published this week serves as a reminder for dental practices to pay close attention to their complaints procedures.</p>
<p>
<p>That’s the warning from dental risk management experts at Dental Protection who suggests that practices should pay heed to the parliamentary and health service ombudsman’s review.</p>
<p>
<p>They also highlight the importance of good, clear communications as a means of avoiding complaints escalating and suggest local resolution is the best approach.</p>
<p>
<p>Hugh Harvie, head of dental services, says: ‘Patient complaints are a common issue with which we frequently assist members – last year we received more than 4,000 enquiries about complaints handling in general practice.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Our experience of complaints escalating due to poor communication mirrors the findings in the ombudsman’s report. We regularly see letters of response from clinicians which are defensive in tone, or simply fail to acknowledge the patient’s concerns.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Issues such as poor explanations, incomplete responses, and factual errors are factors that can prompt a patient to take the matter higher, particularly if they feel their complaint is not being taken seriously.</p>
<p>
<p>‘We also know that an apology is often what the patient is seeking, along with assurance that what they have experienced will not happen to anyone else. This is evident from the ombudsman’s report, where the leading recommendation was for the patient to receive an apology, followed by action to put things right.’</p>
<p>
<p>To coincide with the ombudsman’s report, Dental Protection has revised its range of advice booklets on handling complaints.</p>
<p>
<p>Members of the dental team can download an advice booklet specific to the region of the UK in which they practice (England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland).</p>
<p>
<p>They are free of charge to members and non-members alike and available at <a href=http://www.tinyurl.com/33eu2do>www.tinyurl.com/33eu2do</a>. <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> </p>
<p>^1287619200^3309^Avoid complaints escalating, dentis…^A government review of complaint handling by the NHS published this week serves as a reminder for dental practices to pay close attention to…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/angryface.png<br />
Pilots of dental contracts expected in 2011^^1287619200^3310^Pilots of dental contracts expected…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/man-writing-on-paper-2.jpg<br />
Foundation stone ceremony for dental centre ^
<p>A ceremony to mark the progress of building work for the Peninsula Dental School’s Derriford Dental Education Facility took place at Tamar Science Park in Plymouth last Friday (22 October).</p>
<p>Guest of honour at the event was Barry Cockcroft, chief dental officer for England.</p>
<p>The Derriford Dental Education Facility is the fourth Peninsula Dental Education Facility in the region and joins others in Exeter, Devonport and Truro. When all four are at full capacity students under professional dental supervision will treat over 500 NHS patients a day during term time. </p>
<p>The new facility has 40 dental chairs arranged in five bays of eight, plus one single surgery. It also includes tutorial rooms and seminar rooms and is 50 metres from the main Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry John Bull Building.</p>
<p>
<p>Sixty-four year four students will practise at the Derriford Dental Education Facility for four days a week until they qualify. The first cohort of dental students to qualify from the Peninsula Dental School will do so in July 2011.</p>
<p>A full range of dental care is available free of charge from dental students under the supervision of a qualified dentist  and patients need to allow more time for their appointment than usual. Treatments and services include:<br />• Dental check-ups, oral examination and diagnosis including X-rays <br />• Advice for preventing tooth decay and gum disease including tooth brushing and oral hygiene instruction, dietary advice and the application of sealants that protect the surfaces of teeth <br />• Assessment and treatment of gum disease <br />• Fillings and extractions <br />• Crowns and bridges <br />• Treatment for children <br /> <br />The Dental Education Clinic is primarily an NHS training clinic for dental students. Should a patient require a treatment that is currently not provided by dental students, they will be treated at the Dental Education Clinic by qualified dental staff or referred to other the dental units in the city.</p>
<p>The facility is expected to welcome its first NHS patients in September 2011.</p>
<p>CDO Barry Cockcroft said: ‘Peninsula Dental School is taking the lead in community-based training for the dentists of tomorrow, and this new facility at Derriford will complement the facilities already up and running throughout the South West. My congratulations go to the Peninsula Dental School team who have developed Dental Education Facilities that are embedded in their local communities and which provide first class training to dental students.’</p>
<p>Professor Liz Kay, dean of the Peninsula Dental School, added: ‘The development of the Derriford Dental Education Facility is important for us, because it represents the completion of our Dental Education Facility programme in the region. Early student contact with NHS patients sets our dental degree apart from many others in the UK, and our students have spent the last three years developing positive relationships with their patients and dental professionals in the area – to the immense pride and satisfaction of myself and my colleagues.’</p>
<p>Professor Mary Watkins, deputy vice-chancellor of the University of Plymouth said: ‘As a founding partner of the Peninsula Medical and Dental School, we are committed to working with our partners to improve healthcare training and provision across the region. Our Devonport and Exeter dental training facilities have provided unprecedented and much-needed access to free dental care and we are delighted and excited by the further healthcare opportunities that this new facility will now offer to our local communities.’</p>
<p>Sharon Palser, director of development NHS Plymouth, said: ‘The Peninsula Dental School is a fantastic facility for students and local people alike. NHS Plymouth is proud to continue to support the School and the opening of the Derriford facility is worthy of celebration. Ensuring that local people can access high quality dentistry services is a priority for NHS Plymouth and the facilities, access and services offered by the Dental School complements other services well.’</p>
<p>Dr. Malcolm Prideaux, Chair of the Plymouth Oral Health Advisory Group and a local dentist, added: ‘The building of the Derriford Dental Education Facility is the final piece of the jigsaw to complete the building programme of the Peninsula Dental School. Dentists in the region are looking forward to welcoming the first graduates of this innovative education programme into the profession next summer. We hope that many of the new students graduating from the Peninsula will make their homes here and help us provide the high quality dental care the people of the South West need and deserve. This is an exciting time for dentistry in the region.’ </p>
<p>^1288051200^3319^Foundation stone ceremony for denta…^A ceremony to mark the progress of building work for the Peninsula Dental School’s Derriford Dental Education Facility took place at T…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Foundation-stone[1].png<br />
Essex TV stars treated to tooth whitening^
<p>The Centre of Dental Excellence is the dental practice of choice for new ITV2 TV reality show, <em>The Only Way is Essex</em>.</p>
<p>Dr Jeremy Hill and his team were delighted to have Sam Faiers and her friends along to the Ware practice for the very latest laser tooth-whitening treatment, Zoom.</p>
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<p>He says: ‘Sam and Amy were lovely to work with. It was an interesting day, the practice looked like a film set with all of the cameras, the crew were fantastic, I just hope they filmed my good side!’</p>
<p>The Centre of Dental Excellence featured on <em>The Only Way is Essex</em> on ITV2. </p>
<p>Zoom laser whitening is available at each of the Centre of Dental Excellence practices in Ware, Staines, Luton and Harlington.</p>
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<p> </p>
<p>^1287619200^3311^Essex TV stars treated to tooth whi…^The Centre of Dental Excellence is the dental practice of choice for new ITV2 TV reality show, The Only Way is Essex.Dr Jeremy Hill and his …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Essex-team.png<br />
Find dental implants online^
<p>Around half a million more patients in the UK every year could enjoy the benefits of dental implants. <br /> <br />Patients can now get implant-supported restorations direct from more than 100 UK dental surgeons listed online at <a href=http://www.dentists4implants.com>www.dentists4implants.com</a>. <br /> <br />So, the option of dental implant treatment is no longer limited to patients who are referred by their own general dental practitioner (GDP) to an implant dentist. </p>
<p>Most adult patients with one or more missing teeth can benefit from dental implant treatment, which can totally restore natural oral function, appearance and confidence. <br /> <br />Implant supported dental crowns, bridges and dentures look, feel and function just like real teeth. <br /> <br />Dental implants don’t damage adjacent healthy teeth and the results can last a lifetime. <br /> <br />According to the British Dental Health Foundation patient information leaflet on dental implants, ‘Over the longer term, implants are usually a more cost-effective and satisfactory option’.</p>
<p>The annual number of implant procedures carried out in the UK is a fraction of the volume in other developed countries, like the USA and continental Europe.</p>
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<p>Based on independent data, an average of only 2-3 patients per year receive implants for each general dental practitioner in the UK (during 2010 approximately 54,000 procedures and 23,000 dentists). <br /> <br />Most dentists probably see several potential implant cases every week, but fewer than one in ten provides implant surgery. <br /> <br />Despite more than two decades of research and proven clinical practice, few UK GDPs immediately recognise dental implants as the optimum solution when they see a gap in a patient’s mouth. </p>
<p>Chris Meldrum, UK managing director for implant manufacturer Dentsply Friadent explains how access to implant dentistry has been improved: <br /> <br />He says: ‘The implant dentist directory on www.dentists4implants.com <http://www.dentists4implants.com>  has recently been enhanced to provide information for patients, as well as dental practitioners who want to refer cases. <br /> <br />‘Now, anyone who is thinking about dental implants has direct online access to a list of dentists across the UK who provide the treatment.’</p>
<p>^1287705600^3312^Find dental implants online^Around half a million more patients in the UK every year could enjoy the benefits of dental implants.  Patients can now get implant-sup…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/implantsgirl.png<br />
Katie Price’s teeth grinding causes dental veneer problems^
<p>When Katie Price flew to America to see her dentist recently, it was to have her teeth veneers fixed because they had become loose, and it was not the first time it had happened.</p>
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<p>Her dentist in LA told her it was because she was clenching and grinding her teeth while sleeping.</p>
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<p>Katie, known for her hectic and stressful lifestyle suffers from a little known condition called ‘bruxism’ which is the medical term for teeth clenching and grinding.</p>
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<p>Bruxism is thought to be caused by stress and it can wreak havoc with teeth and dental work.  It can also cause other problems such as headaches and jaw joint pain.</p>
<p>Around 10-20% of the population will suffer from bruxism at any one time, but, like Katie, most of us will experience it at some point during our lifetime, usually  when we are stressed.</p>
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<p>Experts are divided about what to do about it, but applying lifestyle changes and stress reduction techniques can help in many cases.</p>
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<p>However, some UK dentists will grind down teeth to get an even bite, based on the theory that bruxism is an attempt by the body to compensate for an imperfect bite. An increasing number of dentists frown upon the idea of grinding down healthy teeth to get them fitting together perfectly. Instead, they will usually fit a plastic mouthguard to be worn at night.</p>
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<p>Bruxism guards do not stop bruxism but they do protect teeth and dental work from damage that often results from clenching and grinding.</p>
<p>According to the Bruxism Association – <a href=http://www.bruxism.org.uk>www.bruxism.org.uk</a> – bruxism can occur at any age, with the 35-55 age group more prone to the condition. Women seem to suffer from bruxism more than men, with one recent survey indicating a 70%-30% split. </p>
<p>Around half of the people who have been diagnosed with bruxism, found out from their dentist or GP.  However, although dentists may spot the signs of bruxism when examining teeth, it is not always obvious or apparent.</p>
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<p>Bruxism is also not covered in the screening questionnaires that you are asked to fill in when visiting your dentist. This may go some way towards explaining why, according to a survey, around 43% of people with the condition carried out their own research and self diagnosis.</p>
<p>The UK is thought to be several years behind the US when it comes to dental matters. The lack of awareness and understanding of bruxism in the UK at both a professional and individual level compared to the US appears to support this.</p>
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<p>There are signs the UK is catching up though. This week (25 October 2010) sees the start of the first UK Bruxism Awareness Week which is sponsored by a company that makes custom dental guards for dentists.</p>
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<p>The initiative calls for dentists throughout the UK to open their doors to bruxism sufferers so that they can find out more about the condition and the destructive impact it is having on their teeth, dental work and general health.</p>
<p>Although custom made dental guards, which can cost up to £700 are the norm in the UK, the market is now following the US example by offering more convenient and affordable alternative pre-fabricated devices that the bruxism sufferer can easily fit themselves. Such devices are big business in the US, where a multi million dollar market has emerged over recent years.</p>
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<p>One of the leading dental guard manufacturers is now offering an adjustable, ready to wear bruxism dental guards in the UK. The SleepRight – <a href=http://www.sleepright.eu>www.sleepright.eu</a> – dental guard is an innovative device that does the same job as a custom guard for a fraction of the cost and without time off work for fitting.</p>
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<p>It is the only ready to wear bruxism dental guard in the UK to be CE certified and approved by the British Dental Health Foundation – <a href=http://www.dentalhealth.org.uk>www.dentalhealth.org.uk</a>.</p>
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<p>To find out more, email the UK importers info@pipartnership.co.uk or call +44(0)845 299 7089 or visit <a href=http://www.sleepright.eu>www.sleepright.eu</a>.</p>
<p>^1287964800^3313^Katie Price’s teeth grinding causes…^When Katie Price flew to America to see her dentist recently, it was to have her teeth veneers fixed because they had become loose, and it w…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/KATIE.png<br />
Omega-3 may reduce risk of dental problems^
<p>New research shows that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) like fish oil may help fight gum disease.</p>
<p>The study focused on over 9,000 adults who participated in the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999 and 2004 and received dental examinations.</p>
<p>Researchers from Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health found that the prevalence of periodontitis in the study sample was 8.2%. There was an approximately 20% reduction in periodontitis prevalence in those subjects who consumed the highest amount of dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The reduction correlated with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was smaller, while the correlation to linolenic acid (LNA) was not statistically significant.</p>
<p>‘We found that Omega-3 fatty acid intake, particularly DHA and EPA, are inversely associated with periodontitis in the US population,’ commented Asghar Z Naqvi of the Department of Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. ‘To date, the treatment of periodontitis has primarily involved mechanical cleaning and local antibiotic application. Thus, a dietary therapy, if effective, might be a less expensive and safer method for the prevention and treatment of periodontitis.</p>
<p>‘Given the evidence indicating a role for Omega-3 fatty acids in other chronic inflammatory conditions, it is possible that treating periodontitis with Omega-3 fatty acids could have the added benefit of preventing other chronic diseases associated with inflammation.’</p>
<p>Prof. Elizabeth Krall Kaye of Boston University Henry M Goldman School of Dental Medicine, notes that three interesting results emerged from this study. One was that significantly reduced odds of periodontal disease were observed at relatively modest intakes of DHA and EPA. Another result of note was the suggestion of a threshold dose; that is, there seemed to be no further reduction in odds or periodontal disease conferred by intakes at the highest levels. Third, the results were no different when dietary plus supplemental intakes were examined. </p>
<p>These findings are encouraging in that they suggest it may be possible to attain clinically meaningful benefits for periodontal disease at modest levels of Omega-3 fatty acid intake from foods.</p>
<p>Foods that contain significant amounts of polyunsaturated fats include fatty fish like salmon, peanut butter, margarine, and nuts.</p>
<p>The research, <em>n-3 fatty acids and periodontitis in US adults</em>, is published in the November issue (Vol. 110, Issue 11) of the <em>Journal of the American Dietetic Association</em>.</p>
<p>^1288051200^3318^Omega-3 may reduce risk of dental p…^New research shows that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) like fish oil may help fight gum disease.The study focused on over 9,000 adults …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/fish-oil-capsules.jpg<br />
13,000 ‘in harmony’ at Dental Showcase^
<p>This year’s BDTA Dental Showcase proved to be a successful and thoroughly enjoyable event even in the current challenging economic climate.</p>
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<p>More than 340 stands appeared at the event and there were many opportunities for visitors to obtain valuable CPD hours whilst at the event. <br /> <br />The UK’s largest dental exhibition attracted more than 13,000 members of the dental team to London’s ExCeL centre and provided them with a wider selection of products, services and technologies than any other UK dental event.   <br /> <br />As visitors entered the exhibition hall they were welcomed by the impressive sounds of barbershop quartet ‘Rockaholix’ who symbolised this year’s theme – Working in Harmony.</p>
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<p>The Showcase pavilion was a further demonstration of the Showcase 2010 theme as the dental associations representing all members of the dental team appeared together on one stand, just inside the entrance.<br /> <br />Another highlight from Showcase included the Live Theatre, a new initiative, which provided visitors with a chance to watch industry leading dental professionals demonstrate the latest dental technologies and innovations. Hunderds of visitors were delighted to observe the experts’ work with innovative products and techniques.<br /> <br />The Knowledge Hunt was a further new and very successful initiative, which saw almost 500 visitors searching for answers to questions as they walked around the hall and gaining one hour of verifiable CPD in the process. <br /> <br />The BDTA welcomed a group of MPs from the All Party Parliamentary Group for Dentistry on Thursday morning. The MPs toured the exhibition hall, led by BDTA President Edward Attenborough, to learn about the new initiatives and services available to improve patient comfort and satisfaction. <br /> <br />The feature lectures and daily seminars covering the core subjects recommended by the GDC offered at this year’s Showcase were extremely popular and well attended by knowledge hungry visitors.  <br /> <br />Dental Lab Day at Showcase which took place at the event for the first time attracted well over 150 technicians/lab owners and trade representatives.</p>
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<p>Delegates appreciated the opportunity to listen to specialist lectures and speak to representatives from the industry. The initiative was a joint collaboration between the DLA, DTA and BDTA.<br /> <br />The BSDHT also held their AGAM and CPD event on the Saturday of Showcase and were delighted with the number of hygienists and therapists in attendance.<br /> <br />Tony Reed, executive director at the BDTA, says: ‘We constantly seek new ways to enhance the Showcase experience and this year was no exception.  New initiatives such as the Dental Lab Day, the Live Theatre and the Knowledge Hunt were well received by visitors and added different dimensions to the exhibition, geared towards keeping the dental team up to date with the latest developments. We look forward to welcoming you to Showcase 2011.’<br /> <br /><strong>Visitor numbers for Showcase</strong><br />Occupation                             Number   Percentage of visitors   <br />Dentist                                      4,842       37.22%   <br />Laboratory owner                           210         1.61%   <br />Dental technician                           522          4.01%   <br />Practice manager                           876          6.73%   <br />Hygienist/therapist                         663          5.10%   <br />Dental nurse                               2,910        22.37%   <br />Dental receptionist                         305          2.34%   <br />Student dentist                              279          2.14%   <br />Student DCP                                  471          3.62%   <br />Dental manufacturer/dealer             432          3.32%   <br />  Other                                         1499        11.52%   <br />  TOTAL                                      13,009</p>
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<p>For further information on BDTA Dental Showcase visit <a href=http://www.dentalshowcase.com>www.dentalshowcase.com</a></p>
<p>^1287964800^3314^13,000 ‘in harmony’ at Dental Showc…^This year’s BDTA Dental Showcase proved to be a successful and thoroughly enjoyable event even in the current challenging economic cli…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/dentread.png<br />
US set up new oral systemic health association^
<p>A new organisation that’s aimed at spreading the seriousness of the healthy mouth-healthy body connection has been founded in the US. <br /> <br />Oral health leaders from across the country convened in Madison, Wisconsin, to hold the founding meeting for the American Academy for Oral Systemic Health (AAOSH) recently. <br /> <br />‘The formation of this organisation could not have come at a better time,’ says Jim Ratcliff, CEO of Rowpar Pharmaceuticals makers of CloSYS oral care products.<br /> <br />‘More and more research just keeps pouring in that confirms all the connections between the health of the mouth and the resulting health of the body are very real.’<br /> <br />The newly inaugurated AAOSH will bring together medical professionals and makers of oral care products from all fields and try to eliminate the tunnel vision that can exist between medical specialties. <br /> <br />Members will commit themselves to working and learning together in the ultimate spirit of cooperation so that patients everywhere can enjoy the resulting benefits of improved general health, healing, longevity and wellness.<br /> <br />AAOSH president Dr Chris Kammer says: ‘When dentists and physicians work together, medical outcomes will be improved and lives will be lengthened. Many people still don’t understand that good dental health can add years to your life, so one of our missions is to educate the public as well.’<br /> <br />Several nationally known clinicians who attended the meeting gave presentations on the latest findings related to the seriousness of oral disease in America. <br /> <br />One speaker revealed how a couple was not able to conceive a child until the mother’s rampant gum infection was put under control. <br /> <br />Another speaker discussed how diabetes can make gum disease worsen, but that gum disease can also make diabetes worse – a vicious ‘circle of death’ unless dentists and physicians unite and intervene. <br /> <br />In addition, advanced dental techniques and systems for treating periodontal disease and tooth decay were shared, as well as an extended programme on the importance of nutrition. <br /> <br />The new organisation has 50 founding members and anticipates rapid growth as more and more professionals absorb the data that demonstrates the relationship of mouth health to body health and vice versa<br /> <br />‘We’re excited about finally working closely with cardiologists, diabetic specialists, obstetricians and many more medical specialties,’ explains Rowpar’s Jim Ratcliff. <br /> <br />‘AAOSH is all about opening those doors of communication and we’re excited to be part of an organisation focused specifically on the collaboration of healthcare professionals and health care product manufactures to improve the lives of their patients.’</p>
<p>^1287964800^3315^US set up new oral systemic health …^A new organisation that’s aimed at spreading the seriousness of the healthy mouth-healthy body connection has been founded in the US. …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/bluetoothbrush.png<br />
In search of loupes ^
<p>It seems like only yesterday that this year started. It began with welcoming the new first-year students to Peninsula Dental School.</p>
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<p>They were all very enthusiastic and seem to be getting a lot smarter with every year! It is now coming up to the third month of this semester and I feel swamped with work already.</p>
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<p>I realise that dentistry is far from an easy degree and for all those thinking about a career in this area you’ll need to be really organised and be ready for a challenge! Aside from the practical aspect, the academic syllabus is, in a word… tough. Despite this, there is great job satisfaction and I really feel that it will definitely be worth all the hard work. </p>
<p>However, every now and then, there is the opportunity to have a weekend off and the most recent break in my hectic diary came on the weekend of the BDTA Dental Showcase at ExCeL in London.</p>
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<p>Admittedly, I had learnt from word of mouth – and my own experiences from last year at the Dental Showcase in Birmingham – that this is the perfect opportunity to stock up on toothpaste, toothbrushes and randomly, dental restorative materials, to name but a few.</p>
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<p>This year was slightly more focused as I went with a couple of fourth-year students who will be graduating this year and were in search of the perfect pair of loupes at discounted prices!</p>
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<p>We also didn’t come out carrying hundreds of bags full of items that we really didn’t need!</p>
<p>My friends were able to purchase some very nice yet expensive pair of loupes (even with the discount!). There were demonstrations galore ranging from developments in root canal therapy, demos of Botox being carried out and inforamtion for those wanting to investigate the different types of clinical gloves on the market.</p>
<p>It was great to see so many people involved in the dentistry profession all under one roof. It is actually quite a small community when compared with medicine and it is definitely one that I want to be part of eventually. I see the qualified dentists around me as an inspiration and are something that I aspire to be. </p>
<p><strong>In summary</strong><br />1) When I need to buy loupes I will get them from the BDTA Showcase<br />2) I am in love with London and am definitely a big city girl at heart<br />3) I definitely have chosen the right career for me</p>
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<p>That’s all for now folks, but look out for the next instalment in my hectic diary.</p>
<p>^1287964800^3316^In search of loupes ^It seems like only yesterday that this year started. It began with welcoming the new first-year students to Peninsula Dental School.They wer…^<br />
Dentists can have their say in CQC fees^
<p>The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has launched a consultation on the fees it proposes to charge providers of health and adult social care.</p>
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<p>These fees cover CQC’s work in registering providers and monitoring their compliance with essential levels of safety and quality.</p>
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<p>The consultation sets out proposals to simplify fees and put in place a single long-term scheme that will cover all providers registered now and those who will be registered from April 2011.</p>
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<p>It proposes a framework for how fees will be charged based on principles such as fairness, simplicity and proportionality.</p>
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<p>Cynthia Bower, CQC’s chief executive, said: ‘We do not underestimate the impact on providers of paying fees, especially in the current economic climate. We have looked carefully at our costs and will continue to do so. We have a responsibility to collect fees from those we regulate and to demonstrate we are an efficient and effective regulator.’</p>
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<p>The consultation document outlines our three main proposals for:<br />• Categories and bandings for fees, including fee amounts <br />• A single annual fee that incorporates registration and variation fees <br />• Streamlining the payment date for annual fees.</p>
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<p>The consultation runs until January 2011. For more inforamtion, visit <a href=http://www.cqc.org.uk>www.cqc.org.uk</a>.</p>
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<p>Providers can offer their views by filling in an online form, emailing the CQC or posting their views in a letter.</p>
<p>^1287964800^3317^Dentists can have their say in CQC …^The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has launched a consultation on the fees it proposes to charge providers of health and adult social care.Th…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/CQC_logo-copy.png<br />
Online dental decontamination course goes live^
<p>A new dental instrument decontamination training course which can be completed online is now available from international training provider, Eastwood Park Training.</p>
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<p>The web-based programme will assist practices as they ensure compliance with the latest guidelines in the Health Technical Memorandum 01-05 (HTM 01-05) in the specified time, as well as gain verifiable CPD (continuing professional development).</p>
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<p>Downloadable copies of HTM01-05 compliance forms in handy PDF and Word formats included in this programme make it easy for dentists to implement compliant practices swiftly.</p>
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<p>This flexible online learning solution is ideal for NHS and private dental practices and hospitals, as learning can take place at work or at home.</p>
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<p>This has the benefit of reducing time away from the surgery and removes the need for group training which can often reduce staffing levels; it meets the needs of individuals who also have the opportunity to learn at their own pace, as the programme can be completed on a modular basis.</p>
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<p>This contributes to keeping training costs to a minimum yet allows essential staff learning and development to take place in response to the regulatory requirements.</p>
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<p>All primary care dental services are to be regulated from 2011 and compliance with this includes evidence of instrument decontamination training to the HTM guidelines for practice staff, so preparation for this needs to be in place.</p>
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<p>The course includes two hours of verifiable CPD and on completion users can print a course and CPD verification certificate for their CPD record.</p>
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<p>Steve Dickson, learning & programme development manager at Eastwood Park Training says: ‘HTM 01-05 has received a mixed reaction among dental professionals, however, few deny the importance of effective cleaning and inspection procedures of dental instruments, with the priority on patient safety as key.</p>
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<p>‘We became aware from the residential dental training courses we offer that for some finding the opportunity to leave the practice was proving difficult.   Therefore we wanted to create an alternative solution and bring current learning into the practice at a time and place to suit all staff.  We are delighted that this e-learning course will provide an alternative approach to the specified training.’</p>
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<p>Eastwood Park’s online decontamination of dental instruments course is in three parts and will take around two hours in total to complete:</p>
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<p>• An introduction to HTM 01-05</p>
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<p>• The fundamentals of decontamination practice</p>
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<p>• The fundamentals of decontamination management.</p>
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<p>To find out more contact Eastwood Park Training on 01454 262777 or visit <a href=http://www.eastwoodpark.co.uk/training>www.eastwoodpark.co.uk/training</a>.</p>
<p>^1288137600^3322^Online dental decontamination cours…^A new dental instrument decontamination training course which can be completed online is now available from international training provider,…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/NPP_2810.png<br />
Steele slams ‘neglectful’ dental patients ^
<p>The architect of the future of NHS dentistry has slammed patients who do not look after their dental health.<br /> <br />And he’s suggested they be refused dental treatment if they fail to change habits that impact upon their dental health.<br /> <br />Professor Jimmy Steele, head of school and Professor of Oral Health Services Research, at Newcastle University, and author of the 2009 independent review into NHS dentistry, has said that providing expensive treatments when patients will not improve their own dental hygiene is a ‘waste of personal and public money’. <br /> <br />He says crowns and root canal work should not be offered to patients who persist with bad habits after they have been warned their dental health is suffering. <br /> <br />Professor Steele, who is working with the coalition government to create a new contract for NHS dentistry, told the Sunday Times this week: ‘If the delay persists again and again, we should be questioning whether we should be crowning the teeth as they will just rot around the edges.’ <br /> <br />He added: ‘The patient has the responsibility to abide by the recall intervals advised by the dentist and to take reasonable steps to look after their own health. <br /> <br />‘Providing such time-consuming, technically demanding care can be a good investment where it will be valued by and provide benefit for the patient and survive the rigours of the mouth. <br /> <br />‘Providing such care where risk of not managed is a waste of personal and public money.’ <br /> <br />A spokesman for the Department of Health: ‘As set out in the White Paper, we intend to bring in a new dental contract based on registration, capitation and quality. <br /> <br />‘Our aim is to improve oral health for adults and children as well as increase access to NHS dental services. A national steering group has been set up to drive this work forward, with the aim of publishing the pilot proposals by the end of this year. <br /> <br />‘We are not committed to all of the recommendations in Professor Jimmy Steele’s 2009 report but we are delighted that Professor Steele has agreed to assist us in developing the pilot proposals. <br /> <br />‘Our White Paper signals a decisive shift away from top down mandates from Whitehall and towards local decision-making led by clinicians as they are best placed to use their professional judgment and knowledge to decide what treatment is appropriate for each individual patient.’<br /> </p>
<p>^1288051200^3320^Steele slams ‘neglectful’ denta…^The architect of the future of NHS dentistry has slammed patients who do not look after their dental health. And he’s suggested t…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Jimmy-Steele-with-dental-st.png<br />
Poll reveals patients are not mouth cancer-savvy^
<p>The public are oblivious to signs of mouth cancer.</p>
<p>A poll, commissioned to coincide with November’s Mouth Cancer Action Month, reveals that one person in 10 claimed not to have even heard of the condition.</p>
<p>Despite the much-publicised news of the battle actor Michael Douglas is currently having with advanced throat cancer, the survey, conducted by the British Dental Health Foundation and Denplan. oll reveals an alarming lack of awareness about the causes and symptoms of one of the UK’s fastest growing cancers.</p>
<p>The poll of more than 1,000 people suggests that there is only limited knowledge and understanding of this potentially deadly disease.</p>
<p>Chief executive of the Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter, says: “After recent high profile coverage of the Michael Douglas case it is staggering to see that some people still have no awareness at all of the condition.</p>
<p>‘The public need to be aware of the risk factors and whether they are in a high risk group and how they can self-examine or who they can turn to if they’re concerned.’</p>
<p>The results of the survey reveal that it is the older members of the public who are most aware of mouth cancer, with more than 96% of those interviewed saying that they had heard of it.</p>
<p>Dr Carter adds: ‘This sounds good as the majority of cases occur in the over 50s but now more young people are being diagnosed with mouth cancer it is important that everyone is aware of the problem. The survey also shows that women are more aware of the disease than men – yet men are twice as likely as women to suffer with mouth cancer.’</p>
<p>The results of the survey show that more than a third of the public questioned dramatically underestimated the prevalence of the disease by answering that mouth cancer was responsible for one death every day in the UK.  </p>
<p>In fact, mouth cancer causes a death in the UK every five hours and is now responsible for more deaths than cervical and testicular cancer combined.  </p>
<p>Dr Carter says: ‘Rates of mouth cancer have increased by over 40% over the last decade and this year’s figures from Globecan show a worrying 10% increase over last year’s figures to very nearly 6,000 new cases a year.  </p>
<p>‘Despite this, there is not always a great deal of publicity surrounding it, so people just do not realise how common and dangerous it is which is why we run Mouth Cancer Action Month every November in the UK.’</p>
<p>^1288051200^3321^Poll reveals patients are not mouth…^The public are oblivious to signs of mouth cancer.A poll, commissioned to coincide with November’s Mouth Cancer Action Month, reveals that o…^<br />
Halloween is no treat for teeth, says dental expert^
<p>Halloween is a time of ghosts, witches and ghouls, but this year a UK dental charity is reminding parents how traditions such as trick or treating can increase risks of damage to their children’s teeth.</p>
<p>
<p>After an evening of trick or treating, children are likely to return home with a goody bag full of sweets and sugary foods. Although this is exciting for children, parents need to be aware of the risk of tooth decay.</p>
<p>
<p>The British Dental Health Foundation’s chief executive, Dr Nigel Carter, explains that it is better for children to eat sugary foods all together, rather than to spread eating them out over a few hours.</p>
<p>
<p>He says: ‘We want children to enjoy themselves at Halloween. The trick is to find a middle ground – not to gorge on sweets for hours.’</p>
<p>
<p>With Bonfire night also only around the corner, and all the food delights that come with it, the Foundation emphasises that everything is OK in moderation.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Carter says: ‘It’s OK to have the odd sugary treat on a special occasion as long as children keep up their regular dental health routine. On a daily basis, it is important that children have a healthy balanced diet, with five portions of fruit and vegetables. This combined with a good dental cleaning routine with fluoride toothpaste will help protect the teeth against conditions such as tooth decay and gum disease.’</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Carter adds: ‘Each time a sugary food or drink is consumed the sugar reacts with the bacteria in plaque (the sticky coating on the teeth) and produces harmful acids. These acids attack the teeth and dissolve the protective enamel coating on the teeth, which  after many such attacks can lead to a cavity (a hole) forming in the tooth and eventually a need for a filling or extraction – something every parent would want their child to avoid.</p>
<p>
<p>‘The key thing for parents to remember is that it is how often sugar is consumed, rather than how much sugar, which affects the chance of decay. It takes the saliva in the mouth up to an hour to neutralise the acid. This means every time sugary foods or drinks are consumed, the teeth are under attack for an hour. If children are constantly snacking on sweet foods, their teeth never have a chance to recover completely.’</p>
<p>
<p>Substituting sweets for crisps or other carbohydrate snacks won’t stop the risk of cavities either. These can also create an acid environment in the mouth and lead to cavities. Instead, parents can give out healthy snacks such as fruit or breadsticks or even small toys to ‘trick or treaters’.</p>
<p>
<p>The Foundation suggests offering sugar-free sweets and avoiding giving out sticky, sweets such as toffee that stick to the teeth and give the bacteria a longer time in which to attack.</p>
<p>
<p>For parents with any concerns about their child’s dental health, the National Dental Helpline (0845 063 1188) is available Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm. The helpline is staffed by fully qualified dental experts who offer free, confidential and impartial advice on all dental health topics from diet to preventive care to dental decay.</p>
<p>
<p>The helpline can also be contacted by email at helpline@dentalhealth.org. Further information is also available on the Foundation website at <a href=http://www.dentalhealth.org>www.dentalhealth.org</a>.</p>
<p>^1288137600^3323^Halloween is no treat for teeth, sa…^Halloween is a time of ghosts, witches and ghouls, but this year a UK dental charity is reminding parents how traditions such as trick or tr…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/halloween.png<br />
Calling all healthcare professionals^^1288137600^3325^Calling all healthcare professional…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Astellas.jpg<br />
Dentists told ‘economy more robust than thought’^
<p>The economy grew by 0.8% in the three months to September, indicating the recovery is more robust than had been thought.</p>
<p>Many analysts had expected GDP to fall from 1.2% in the previous quarter to 0.4% on the back of consumer fears over the impact of the spending cuts, which were announced by the Government last week.</p>
<p>Allowing for the recovery in Q2 following the bad weather at the start of the year, the underlying growth in Q3 is broadly similar to that in the three months to June 30. </p>
<p>The growth in the third quarter was driven by rising activity levels in the services, construction and production sectors the ONS figures reveal.</p>
<p>Total services output rose 0.6% in the third quarter. The largest contribution to the growth in the period was from business services and finance and government and other services.</p>
<p>Distribution, hotels and restaurants rose 0.6%, with retail contributed most to growth in this sector.</p>
<p>Transport, storage and communication increased by 0.7%, compared with a decrease of 1.5% in the previous quarter.</p>
<p>
<p>Post and telecommunications and land transport contributed most.</p>
<p>Business services and finance rose 0.5%, compared with an increase of 1% in the previous quarter.</p>
<p>
<p>Manufacturing made the largest contribution to the growth, where output rose 1%.</p>
<p>Dr Brian Sloan, head of business and economic policy at Greater Manchester Chamber of Commerce, said despite the heartening figures he expects growth to slow in the current quarter.</p>
<p>‘We must remember that last quarter’s performance was out of the ordinary and whilst the Spending Review has yet to take effect, businesses themselves have been preparing for some months and our view is that we will see a further slowing of growth in the fourth quarter. </p>
<p>‘But we must remain positive and maintain confidence; talk of a double-dip recession is premature. </p>
<p>‘The Bank of England is likely to preserve with a 0.5% interest rate and defer a second round of quantitative easing for the time being, which we feel would be appropriate at this time.’</p>
<p>^1288137600^3324^Dentists told ‘economy more robust …^The economy grew by 0.8% in the three months to September, indicating the recovery is more robust than had been thought.Many analysts had ex…^<br />
X-Factor stars get their smile makeover^
<p>Contestants on ITV’s <em>The X-Factor</em> have all been given a smile makeover, courtesy of the Centre of Dental Excellence group.</p>
<p>
<p>Principal dentist Dr Jeremy Hill and his team were invited along to the secret X-Factor house to treat each of the contestants.</p>
<p>
<p>The Centre of Dental Excellence was selected as the dentists for <em>X-Factor</em> 2010 and each contestant was given star smile treatment with the latest Zoom! laser tooth-whitening.</p>
<p>
<p><img style=float: right; src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/boys.png alt= Right, the boy band One Direction

Dr Hill said: ‘I’m proud to have been personally selected by a number of celebrities to carry out any dental treatments they may have required.

‘Recently, it has been fun to work with the television shows. The celebrities I have met have been lovely to work with, but I like to think that I give each of my patients – celebrity or not – the same care and attention.’

Gary Dickenson, of Discus Dental, the company that developed and markets the Zoom! whitening system, said: ‘I’m very excited about this. Being part of The X-Factor is a massive deal for Discus – and it was great fun being involved.’

The Centre of Dental Excellence group has practices in Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire and Staines.

 

^1288224000^3332^X-Factor stars get their smile make…^Contestants on ITV’s The X-Factor have all been given a smile makeover, courtesy of the Centre of Dental Excellence group.Principal de…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Chezza-and-gals.png
Dental practice offers Halloween sweet amnesty^

As children busily collected ‘trick or treat’ sweets at the weekend, Denplan dental practices across the country took the opportunity to remind young patients of how to look after their teeth – and to ensure that ghoulish goodies didn’t spell dental disaster this Halloween!

‘We decided to host an Open Day for our younger patients using the theme of Halloween as a fun way to get them involved in their own oral healthcare,’ said Dawn Greenwood, oral health educator at the Denplan-member Briercliffe Road Dental Practice in Burnley.

‘With Halloween fancy dress, dental goodie bags and special children’s power toothbrushes to win, there was no shortage of creativity about the surgery.’

Shilla Talati, principal at Dental Perfection in Coventry said: ‘We used the Halloween theme to launch our ‘Mini Molars Club’ for children to learn more about their oral health.

‘The event was a great success and not only did Denplan provide lots of practical advice on how to advertise the event, but they also sent out a bespoke press release to local papers on our behalf.’

Dental teams have also shown children the correct amount of toothpaste to use and highlighted just how important it is to brush twice a day.

‘The good news is that sweets can be enjoyed in moderation as part of balanced diet and a healthy dental routine,’ says Sonny Sagoo, a principal dentist at Clover House Dental Practice, which was offering tooth-friendly tips for his child patients this Halloween, from tooth brushing, snack-swapping and how best to eat the foods they enjoy.

Talbot Road Dental Practice ran a ‘Halloween amnesty’, where patients and non-patients traded in leftover sweets for toothpastes and receive some helpful hints and tips on how to look after their oral health – ideal for some post ‘trick or treat’ dental care.

To find out more about how Denplan can help you promote your practice or upcoming events, please contact the press team on 01962 827997.

^1288742400^3355^Dental practice offers Halloween sw…^As children busily collected ‘trick or treat’ sweets at the weekend, Denplan dental practices across the country took the opport…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Halloween_briercliffe.png
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Schools get an oral health education^

Health Minister Lord Howe visited Chorley in Lancashire today, to launch the innovative Smile4Life programme, which promotes good oral health among pre-school children in the region.

Smile4Life sees Lancashire County Council join forces with NHS Central Lancashire, NHS North Lancashire and NHS East Lancashire, to combat the region’s poor record on tooth decay in children by educating pre-school children about the importance of looking after their teeth.

The programme involves members of the local NHS dental team visiting pre-schools across the county to provide advice to young children and their carers on tooth brushing, the importance of regular visits to the dentists, and encouraging a healthier diet.

After the official launch at the Woodland’s Centre in Chorley, Lord Howe paid a visit to Ribbleton Children’s Centre in Preston where he met with staff and children to see first hand how members of the local NHS dental team and nursery teachers work together to encourage better oral health in children.

Commenting on the Smile4Life programme, Lord Howe said: ‘The NHS White Paper set out our commitment to improving the oral health of children and the Smile4Life programme is an excellent example of how the NHS can achieve this.

‘Even though there have been improvements in children’s oral health, there is more that can and should be done to tackle persistent inequalities, especially in Lancashire, which suffers from some of the highest levels of children’s tooth decay in the country.

‘Tooth decay in children is a serious problem. It can cause a great deal of pain and discomfort, and treating it is very costly for the NHS. Focusing on prevention is not only better for the children, but is also better use of NHS resources. I’m delighted to see the local authority and the NHS taking innovative action to address this very important local health issue, and I hope others will follow suit.”

Commenting on the Minister’s visit, County Councillor Susie Charles, cabinet member for children and shools, added: ‘We are delighted that Lord Howe was able to come and visit and see the important work we’re doing to combat poor oral health. Smile4Life will not only improve our children’s teeth but help to lay the foundations for good oral health throughout life. Running the campaign through nurseries and other child care settings enables us to reach large numbers of children and put those foundations in place from an early age.

Eric Rooney, consultant in dental public health for NHS Central Lancashire added: ‘Poor oral health impacts on the quality of children’s lives and this programme has the potential to change that. We know that dental decay can be prevented by encouraging healthy eating and drinking and by the use of fluoride toothpaste. By working with the council we can support children from an early age to have good teeth and a healthier lifestyle.’

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