Lord Howe opens ‘innovative’ dental academy

A new £9 million centre for training dental professionals of the future opened in Hampshire today (Wednesday).

The University of Portsmouth’s Dental Academy was officially opened by parliamentary under-secretary of state for health, Lord Howe.

Lord Howe, who is the minister with lead responsibility for dentistry, said: ‘I was delighted to see the high quality hands-on training provided at Portsmouth Dental Academy today.

‘As set out in the NHS White Paper, we are committed to improving oral health for adults and children as well as increasing access to NHS dental services across the country.

‘The University of Portsmouth Dental Academy has an important role to play in delivering on this agenda. They are providing first-class training and education for our future dentists and dental care professionals and excellent services to patients in the area.’

‘Historically the Portsmouth area has had significant oral health needs which the Dental Academy, working in partnership with others, will help to address. It aims to specifically target those people who have been previously considered hard to reach, including children, the elderly and those who, for a variety of reasons, have not had regular access to a NHS dentist.’

The innovative approach sees final-year dental students, from King’s College London Dental Institute, working alongside hygiene therapists and dental nursing students, replicating real-life practice.

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Supervised by tutors, students also provide free treatment for local people every year.
The new centre has 20 additional dental chairs, radiography facilities, a modern instrument decontamination centre as well as seminar rooms.

Clinical director John Weld said: ‘They learn to work together for the best advantage of the patient.’

He said that the system teaches dentists of tomorrow how to delegate and create a ‘pyramid’ approach to dental care with the right dental professionals carrying out the right treatments, successfully bridging the gap ‘between a hospital setting and primary dental care’.

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The Dental Academy is an innovative education partnership between the University of Portsmouth and King’s College London Dental Institute (KCLDI).  Every year 80 final year dental students from KCLDI will join dental hygiene, therapy and dental nursing students from Portsmouth to train and work together in teams.

Supervised by tutors, the students provide dental treatment and advice to people from Portsmouth, Hampshire and the Isle of Wight.

The arrangements will enable student dental care professionals and dentists to experience working as a team just as they will in practice, following a treatment model that empowers patients to take ownership of their oral health.

Development of the new building has been enabled by capital funding support from the Department of Health, the local NHS and the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE).

Historically the Portsmouth area has had significant oral health needs that the dental academy, working in partnership with others, will help to address.

It aims to specifically target those people who have been previously considered hard to reach, including children, the elderly and those who, for a variety of reasons, have not had regular access to a NHS dentist.

Director of the dental academy, Sara Holmes, said: ‘Today marks the culmination of over two years of planning and represents a unique partnership between the University and the NHS.
The entire staff and student body are thrilled to be working and studying, alongside colleagues from Kings, in such a dynamic and progressive institution right the heart of Portsmouth.’

‘Everyone who has contributed to making this happen should be extremely proud of creating a unique facility which will leave a lasting legacy.’

The facility will cater for approximately 2000 new patients per annum and provide a dynamic programme of continuing professional development training events for local dental care professionals.

Nairn Wilson, Dean and Head of KCLDI, said: King’s College London Dental Institute is delighted to have joined forces with the University of Portsmouth to create the Dental Academy, with a focus on innovation in the education of the dental team and the student experience.

‘We look forward to working with the university to build on the early success of the Academy to expand its range of activities to include research of international standing and state of the art postgraduate education and training.
 
‘Today’s formal opening of the Academy marks the beginning of a most promising, forward looking collaborative venture with enormous potential.’

The event was attended by members of the local dental community, representatives from the local NHS and from KCLDI who were joined by university chancellor, the actress Sheila Hancock.

The University of Portsmouth Dental Academy succeeds and builds on the University of Portsmouth School of Professionals Complementary to Dentistry, which opened in 2005.

The University of Portsmouth Dental Academy trains students in the following courses
• Foundation Award in Science and Dental Therapy
• BSc (Hons) Dental Hygiene and Dental Therapy
•nCertificate of Higher Education in Dental Nursing

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<p>The new development has been possible due to the support of the NHS and Higher Education Funding Council for England. The building and equipping costs, circa £9 million, have been met through capital contributions received from the H E F C England, (£3m) the Department of Health (£1.6 million) and the local NHS (£2.3 million).</p>
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<p>The additional revenue, circa £1.2 million, is derived from a combination of Dental Service Increment for Teaching (DSift) monies and contracts with local NHS commissioners (NHS Portsmouth/Hampshire and Isle of Wight).</p>
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Ashley Latter webcast for dentists^
<p>Ashley Latter’s first live webcast of 2011 will take place next Wednesday (9 February) at 6pm and  is dedicated to <em>Increasing Treatment Plan Acceptance</em> and features Software of Excellence’s new guru patient education software.</p>
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<p>And with more than 100 registrations already made, time is running out to be a part of this informative event.</p>
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<p>Ashley will be accompanied by SoE’s business development manager for guru Matt McColley, and during the live webcast each will deliver a 20-minute presentation on how to get more of your patients to say ‘yes’ to your treatment recommendations.</p>
<p>As an experienced speaker, Ashley has motivated thousands of dentists to believe they can translate more of their treatment plans into treatment realities.</p>
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<p>In this presentation, he will offer an introduction of the main themes of treatment acceptance such as; building relationships, providing solutions and overcoming objections.</p>
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<p>Matt will conduct a live demonstration of guru and explain how this unique software is helping make treatment plan acceptance easier by allowing dentists to create professional, customised treatment presentations for use at the chairside, in reception and on the web. </p>
<p>The webcast is live and interactive giving you the opportunity to submit questions directly to Ashley or Matt either during or after the webcast.</p>
<p>Log in to this FREE webcast and listen to Ashley and Matt from the comfort of your own computer. Book your place NOW – visit <a href=http://www.fsmevents.com/soeidental>www.fsmevents.com/soeidental</a> to register.</p>
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Dentists call for clarity on Monitor^
<p>The intended role for Monitor in dental practice must be clarified by Government, the British Dental Association (BDA) warns today.</p>
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<p>John Milne, chair of the BDA’s General Dental Practice Committee (GDPC), argued at a Westminster Health Forum event that dentistry is already heavily regulated and that it would be inappropriate for Monitor’s licensing arrangements to be extended to dentists.<br /> <br />Dr Milne points out that dentists already have clear business and professional imperatives to ensure that their practices are able to provide high quality care to patients, arguing that the risk of practices failing is therefore very small and that regulation by Monitor would be disproportionate.</p>
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<p>He says that imposing a further layer of bureaucracy is unnecessary and inappropriate, and would be costly; and remind the event of the role the Care Quality Commission will take up on 1 April and the individual regulation of dentists and dental care professionals that is already performed by the General Dental Council.<br /> <br />Pointing out that the provision of high quality care and lowest priced contract bids from providers rarely go hand in hand, Dr Milne explains that any moves to enlarge the role of price competition in tendering for dental contracts would not be in patients’ interests.<br /> <br />Dr Milne said: ‘We do not believe it is necessary, or in patients’ best interests, for Monitor’s economic regulatory function to be extended to dental practice. We are therefore calling for government to reassure the profession by clarifying the intention of its Health and Social Care Bill on this issue. Dentistry is already highly-regulated and efficiently run. Commonsense must be allowed to prevail.’</p>
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Mouthwash linked to lowering pre-term birth^
<p>A new study suggests that use of non-alcohol antibacterial mouthwash containing cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) decreases the incidence of preterm birth.</p>
<p>The findings were presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in San Francisco, US. </p>
<p>Study author, Marjorie Jeffcoat, D.M.D, says: ‘This research demonstrated that reducing the severity of periodontal disease has a direct correlation with preterm birth. </p>
<p>‘Preterm birth is the major cause of peri-natal mortality and morbidity worldwide and still difficult to predict and prevent.</p>
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<p>‘So, when we found that something as simple as mouthwash could change the outcomes, we were very excited.’</p>
<p>The study was funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and Procter & Gamble. <br />It was a controlled blind clinical study of pregnant women at 6-20 weeks gestation with periodontal disease who refused dental care and did not have obstetric infections. </p>
<p>Treatment was assigned to blocks of four subjects based on four strata: prior preterm birth (yes or no), and smoking (yes or no). </p>
<p>Each block assigned three controls and one rinse subject.</p>
<p>Of 204 subjects, 155 served as untreated controls (exposure group), and 49 (non-exposure group) received an antimicrobial CPC non-alcohol mouthwash (Crest Pro-Health, Procter and Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio). </p>
<p>The primary outcome was spontaneous preterm birth less than 35 weeks. Dental examinations were performed at baseline and prior to delivery. </p>
<p>Gestational age and weight at birth was recorded by abstractors. </p>
<p>Groups were compared using statistical test Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Dichotomous variables were compared using the chi-square test; logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios.</p>
<p>There was no significant difference at baseline in smoking, prior preterm birth or alcohol consumption between groups. Maternal age was higher in the rinse group than in the control group. No adverse events were observed. The incidence of preterm birth less than 35 weeks was significantly lower in the subjects using the rinse compared to the controls. Gestational age and birth weight (adjusted for maternal age) were significantly higher in the rinse group.</p>
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Belfast dental patients recalled^
<p>Belfast Trust has ordered the recall of 117 dental patients for  check ups – as a precautionary measure – following a review of the  clinical performance of a senior consultant at the School of Dentistry. </p>
<p>The  action follows an extensive review of patients treated by the dentist,  who is no longer working clinically but is still employed by the Trust. </p>
<p>Speaking  to the Northern Ireland Assembly today [7 February 2011], health  minister Michael McGimpsey spoke of his shock and reassured the public  that a rigorous independent inquiry will be held.</p>
<p>Trust medical  director, Dr Tony Stevens, said people should not be alarmed. Anyone who  needs to be contacted has already been sent a letter and all of these  will have been delivered by Saturday 5 February. </p>
<p>He said: ‘We  have completed a thorough, formal investigation into the dental  consultant’s clinical performance and, as a result of this, we have  identified 18 patients about whom we had immediate concerns. All of  these have been seen and treated. </p>
<p>‘The recall of 117 patients is an additional precaution to make sure they received the best possible quality of care. </p>
<p>‘We  do not want to cause undue alarm as they are unlikely to have any  serious illness but we wish to offer them the chance of a full dental  assessment.’</p>
<p>A number of clinics have been arranged for any of  the 117 patients who want to take up the offer, which will be held over  the next few weeks. The patients have been asked in their letters to  contact a dedicated telephone line to arrange an appointment at a time  that suits them.</p>
<p>To read the minister’s full statement to the Northern Ireland Assembly, click <a href=http://www.northernireland.gov.uk/index/media-centre/news-departments/news-dhssps/news-dhssps-070211-ministerial-statement-regional.htm>here</a>.</p>
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Bottle feeding linked to tooth decay^
<p>Experts are urging parents to stop bottle-feeding their babies because of rising rates of severe tooth decay in infants as young as 12 months.<br /> <br />A professor at a leading children’s hospital in Australia said naturally occurring lactose was present in both breast milk and formula but when combined with plaque in a baby’s mouth via a bottle, it could erode the enamel of primary teeth.<br /> <br />Associate Professor Richard Widmer, of The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, said: ‘Ideally, children should go straight from breast to cup, avoiding bottles altogether.’<br /> <br />Although it has become widely accepted that babies should not go to sleep suckling on juice, cordial or other sweet drinks, the warning about milk is likely to come as a shock to many mothers.<br /> <br />Professor Widmer said the hospital had been removing teeth, under general anaesthetic, from babies as young as 12 months due to bottle-feeding infants at bedtime.<br /> <br />He said that in a group of 100 five-year-olds, as many as one-third would have some form of tooth decay and as many as nine per cent severe decay.<br /> <br />Even when teeth had not formed, it was important to establish good habits and not let a child become accustomed to sucking on a bottle at night, Professor Widmer said.<br /> <br />Of the 600 children he treated in emergency each year, as many as 15% had presented with severe tooth decay.<br /> <br />Professor Widmer advises on taking children to the dentist from the age of 12 months and no later than two, and brushing as their first teeth appear.<br /> <br />Angus Cameron, head of paediatric dentistry at Sydney University and Westmead Hospital, said tooth decay was so bad in some infants that they had to have every one of their primary teeth removed.</p>
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Junk diet impacts on kids’ IQ^
<p>Toddlers fed a diet of junk food can suffer lasting damage to their brainpower, experts say.</p>
<p>Children who eat more chips, crisps, biscuits and pizza before the age of three have a lower IQ five years later, a study shows.</p>
<p>The difference could be as much as five IQ points compared with children given healthier diets with fruit, vegetables and home-cooked food.</p>
<p>But even if their diet improves, it could be too late as the ill-effects can last a lifetime.</p>
<p>This is the first study to suggest a direct link between the diet of young children and their brainpower in later life.</p>
<p>The project at Bristol University took account of factors such as social class, breastfeeding and maternal education and age.</p>
<p>Researchers also allowed for the influence of the home environment, for example a child’s access to toys and books.</p>
<p>They said good nutrition was crucial in the first three years of life when the brain grows at its fastest rate.</p>
<p>Young children eating a diet packed with fats, sugar and processed foods consume too few vitamins and nutrients, which means their brains never grow to optimal levels.</p>
<p>The findings are the latest to be published from a major investigation of childhood development called the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.</p>
<p>This tracks the long-term health and well-being of around 14,000 children born in the early 1990s. </p>
<p>Three dietary patterns were identified; a processed diet high in fats and sugar, a traditional diet of meat and vegetables and a health-conscious diet high in salad, fruit and vegetables.</p>
<p>Researchers Dr Pauline Emmett and Dr Kate Northstone said the effect of a poor diet on brain development could persist forever, even if the diet improved.</p>
<p>In the study published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, children’s IQ was measured when they reached eight years old.</p>
<p>Dr Emmett said that the diet for children aged four or seven years had no impact on IQ scores.</p>
<p>But the 20% of children with the worst diet at the age of three had on average an IQ score five points lower than the group eating the best diet by the time they got to eight, she said.</p>
<p>She added: ‘The brain grows at its fastest rate during the first three years and good nutrition during this period may encourage optimal brain growth. </p>
<p>‘By the age of three, brain development is slowing down which is perhaps why the diet doesn’t have much effect afterwards.’</p>
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Online dental learning system launched^
<p>More than 200 attendees at the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK)’s Open Day on 3 February 2011 were present at the launch of Touchstone.</p>
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<p>Touchstone is an online portfolio and learning system that has been tailored to the needs of dentists and dental care professionals.</p>
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<p>It is available free of charge to all FGDP(UK) members, and anyone studying on the Faculty’s courses, including the MJDF.<br /> <br />Launching Touchstone, Lawrence Mudford, chair of the FGDP (UK)’s education committee, said: ‘We believe that Touchstone is a tool that will make a very real, positive difference to the working lives of dentists and dental care professionals (DCPs). <br /> <br />‘The FGDP(UK) is keen to develop more and better services for its members. We believe that our services should contribute towards our aim of improving standards of patient care. <br /> <br />Touchstone is a truly significant new benefit for FGDP(UK) members, and potentially for the whole dental community.’<br /> <br />Touchstone is a multi-functional program.</p>
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<p>At its core is the ability to store any number of documents on Touchstone, from Word files to audio/visual files.</p>
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<p>These can then be used for multiple purposes. Users can record, reflect on, store and manage their CPD records. Records can be retrieved at any point, or exported using templates designed to meet the needs of the MJDF Portfolio of Evidence, the General Dental Council, Care Quality Commission and ultimately, revalidation. </p>
<p>Touchstone is being integrated into the Faculty’s postgraduate training programmes.</p>
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<p>Students undertaking a programme of study with the FGDP(UK) will be able to organise and submit their coursework through Touchstone, share documents with tutors and interact with them. <br /> <br />In order to make Touchstone as intuitive and easy to access as possible, users can log in from the FGDP(UK) website with just one click.</p>
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<p>Touchstone can also be accessed from any computer with an internet connection, and on handheld devices such as the iPhone. <br /> <br />The next stage for Touchstone is to build the user base. From around 300 users on the pilot phase, the FGDP(UK) hopes to increase the number of users to 2,000-plus by the end of 2011.</p>
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<p>At the same time, the Faculty will be working with external bodies in order to ensure that Touchstone remains relevant to the needs of modern dental practitioners and DCPs.</p>
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<p>Touchstone has been launched but there is much more to come from it in the future.</p>
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Cosmetic surgery show in London^
<p>The Cosmetic Surgery Show is to take place at the prestigious Olympia Exhibition and Conference Centre in the heart of London in April.</p>
<p>The event, taking place on 15-16 April 2011, provides an opportunity for consumers to explore the many surgical, non-surgical and alternative cosmetic treatments on offer to improve and enhance body image.</p>
<p>Visitors to the show will be able to enjoy an all-embracing seminar programme, free consultations, and a host of interactive features.</p>
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<p>For people ready to have treatment, the event will also provide an opportunity to fully appreciate the serious side of surgery, while creating a sympathetic and informative environment for consumers considering the cosmetic surgery route.</p>
<p>Nav Mann, organiser of the show, says: ‘Despite the worst recession in recent history, demand for cosmetic surgery in the UK has increased during the last two years to reach a staggering £2.3 billion, a figure that supported the substantial interest from visitors to our previous healthcare event. Interest which prompted the launch of a dedicated event, The Cosmetic Surgery Show.’</p>
<p>The exhibition will encompass a wide selection of hospitals and clinics from the UK and overseas, offering popular cosmetic surgery procedures that are designed to help improve different areas of the body. </p>
<p><strong>To visit</strong><br />Tickets are priced at £10 at the door, but visitors can save £5 by booking in advance. <br />Please visit <a href=http://www.cosmeticsurgeryshow.co.uk>www.cosmeticsurgeryshow.co.uk</a>.</p>
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<p>Tickets to the Cosmetic Surgery Show also includes free entry to Destination Health – The Health & Medical Tourism Show, the Fertility Show and the Spa and Wellness Show.</p>
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More than 36,000 dentists pay their ARF ^
<p>The General Dental Council has successfully processed 36,962 annual retention fee (ARF) payments from its dentist registrants.</p>
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<p>The deadline to pay the fee for 2011 was 31 December 2010. Nearly 5,000 of those who paid used the regulators’ eGDC website, <a href=http://www.eGDC-uk.org>www.eGDC-uk.org</a>.</p>
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<p>This allows users to: <br />• Log their Continuing Professional Development (CPD) hours;<br />• Update their registered address or complete a Direct Debit instruction online;<br />• Access their Annual Practising Certificate information;<br />• Have control over many of their registration responsibilities 24/7.</p>
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<p>The figure of 886 dentists were removed from the register for not paying their ARF – so far 171 applications for restoration to the register have been received. 514 dentists voluntarily requested that their names be removed.</p>
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<p>If a dentist missed the deadline to pay their ARF they will need to apply to be restored to the register. Practising while not registered is considered illegal practice and the GDC will take action through the criminal courts.</p>
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<p>Dentists who want to return to the register must:<br />• Complete a form to apply for restoration;<br />• Have a medical examination and provide a character reference;<br />• Pay a fee of £696 – which includes the ARF;<br />• If they were practising overseas while off the register, they must provide a letter of good standing from the relevant authority of the country/state in which they last worked;<br />• If they were working in the UK when their name was removed from the register, they and their employer will need to explain the circumstances in a letter.  If this has occurred they are advised to contact their solicitor or defence organisation before submitting their application.</p>
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<p>Further information can be found at <a href=http://www.gdc-uk.org>www.gdc-uk.org</a> or by calling 0845 222 4141.</p>
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Dentists share the love on Valentine’s Day^
<p>Philips is sending a heartwarming Valentine’s gift to dental professionals with a topical message to ‘Love Their Toothbrush…. and Switch to Sonicare’.<br /> <br />The 3D card features a heart-shaped cut-out on the front cover which reveals a heart-shaped, blue foil-covered chocolate heart nestled within.</p>
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<p>On the reverse, the message advises dental professionals that if they make the switch to Sonicare and experience the difference, they will have a fresh, confident smile for Valentine’s Day.    <br /> <br />Not only will the box card be mailed out, but the Philips’ team will be delivering copies to their favourite practices in the days leading up to Valentine’s Day to share the love as widely as possible.<br /> <br />This is part of a new campaign developed by Philips to encourage users of manual toothbrushes (or other powered toothbrush brands) to make the switch to Sonicare in order to fully appreciate the benefits using a Sonicare sonic toothbrush.</p>
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<p>For more information about switching to Sonicare visit <a href=http://www.sonicare.co.uk/dp >www.sonicare.co.uk/dp</a> or call 0800 0567 222.</p>
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Ex Pussycat Doll launches new beauty line^
<p>Former Pussycat Doll Kimberly Wyatt has announced the launch of her brand new make up line BM Beauty.</p>
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<p>Along with Scottish business partner Laura McComiskie, founder of skincare line Love The Planet, Kimberly, who is now a judge on the US TV reality show, <em>Live To Danc</em>e, has developed a beautiful range of mineral foundations, blushes, bronzers, concealers and finishing powders, as well as vibrant eyeshadows, mascaras and lip glosses.</p>
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<p>The BM Beauty range is high fashion, natural and cruelty free.</p>
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<p>The range has recently gained approval from the BUAV. Last month Kimberly took part in the BUAV’s No Cruel Cosmetics Campaign.</p>
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<p>BM Beauty make up is also vegetarian and vegan friendly.</p>
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<p>The make up is now available from <a href=http://www.bmbeauty.com>www.bmbeauty.com</a> and will be available from selected outlets nationwide later in the year.</p>
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<p>Skin perfection with a ‘no make up’ feel. What could be better? BM Beauty, the dream begins….</p>
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No pain dentistry? Water claim!^
<p>A family practice based in the centre of Edinburgh with approximately 1,500 patients is claiming to be the first practice in Scotland to offer ‘no pain dentistry’ to Scots. </p>
<p>Integrated Dentalcare is promising an ‘Oscar smile’ at an affordable price – without pain or discomfort. </p>
<p>The practice is pioneering water laser technology, a technique that has led its practitioners to claim that patients will no longer have to be scared of dental visits, as this groundbreaking new treatment is completely pain-free. </p>
<p>Ania Sepiol, who lives in Edinburgh, was one of the first patients to undergo water laser treatment in Scotland and says it has transformed the way she views the dentist.</p>
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<p style=text-align: right;><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/waterlase-2.jpg alt=

Ania (pictured above) says: ‘Everybody wants to look their best, but no one really likes going to the dentist. I have always had twisted front teeth, and some broken ones at the back, but was very apprehensive about getting them fixed.

‘However, when one of my front teeth broke I knew I had to do something about it.

‘As soon as I was told about the water laser treatment I was very interested, but I found it very hard to believe. After experiencing a lifetime of discomfort and apprehension when visiting the dentist it was hard to imagine this was not going to be just another gimmick.

‘However, everything I was told was true. There was no pain or discomfort at all. There was no whiny noise of the drill, no vibrations, no injection. In fact, water laser treatment takes away everything you hate about visiting the dentist. Instead it was like someone was spraying your teeth with a gentle stream of water, it was absolutely amazing.’

Dental practitioner, Neeraj Puri, says Integrated Dentalcare is always on the look out for new and innovative ways of making their patients more comfortable.

He explains: ‘I spend a lot of time researching the latest techniques and equipment, on the market. Often travelling to the US and Europe, to ensure that we avoid the fads and gimmicks. At the same time we are very conscious that because of the present economic climate the treatments should be within the reach of everybody.

‘We see every patient as unique, and offer treatments which are designed to meet their individual needs. We don’t want people to be scared of the dentist, we want our patients to look after their teeth and be proud of their smile.

‘We see the water laser treatment as a fantastic way of taking the fear and discomfort out of going to the dentist. There are no blades or drills. The water laser treatment makes your tooth feel drowsy which allows us to work on it without any discomfort.

‘For anybody who does not like going to the dentist, this really is an amazing invention, and we definitely believe it is worth the £60,000 investment we have made in it. Everybody who has experienced this treatment has been amazed, and I am just delighted that we are in the fortunate position to offer our patients such fantastic treatment options.’

Integrated Dentalcare is the only practice in Scotland to offer water laser treatments.

Integrated Dentalcare is a family practice, based in the centre of Edinburgh, with approximately 1,500 patients. It is committed to using the very latest technology to make their patients dental experience as pleasurable as possible.

Water laser treatment was invented in California, and a machine costs approximately £60,000. The cost of water laser treatment varies, and in some cases can even work out cheaper than everyday treatments as no anesthetic is being used. Prices start from £67.

The Waterlase machine has two lasers, one that numbs the tooth and one for carrying out the required dental surgery.

Integrated Dentalcare offers its patients monthly payment plans with 0% finance. Contracts with the practice start at £17 per month. This provides you with four appointments per year and 10% off all treatments. Due to the great success of the adult maintenance plan, a children’s maintenance plan has recently been introduced. This allows ID to provide affordable family dental care.

‘Why should our future generation have to be subjected to the same fear and discomfort that we experienced?’ adds Neeraj.


About Integrated Dentalcare
Integrated Dentalcare is a private dental practice based in Edinburgh and is the most advanced clinic in Scotland. The clinic is championing ‘no pain’ dentistry at affordable cost and invests in state-of-the-art equipment to provide the best dental experience possible. Integrated Dentalcare is the only Scottish dental practice to offer water laser treatments, which eliminates the need for blades, drills and anesthetics. Visit www.integrateddentalcare.com.

 

^1297123200^3649^No pain dentistry? Water claim!^A family practice based in the centre of Edinburgh with approximately 1,500 patients is claiming to be the first practice in Scotland to off…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/waterlase-1.jpg
Configurator software for GC composites^^1297123200^3650^Configurator software for GC compos…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/GaenialConfigurator.jpg
3D stitching enhances dental view^^1297123200^3651^3D stitching enhances dental view^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/9000-Stitching.jpg
New single-level polishing system^^1297123200^3652^New single-level polishing system^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Dimanto.jpg
European quality and reliability^^1297209600^3653^European quality and reliability^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Implant-surgery-d2d-Implants.jpg
BDA deadline for early bird bookings ^

The deadline for ‘early bird’ bookings for British Dental Conference and Exhibition is nearing.
 
Members of the dental community have until 28 February to take advantage of special ‘early bird’ ticket prices for the 2011 British Dental Conference and Exhibition, which will take place at Manchester’s Central Convention Complex from 19-21 May.

Further savings on the regular ticket prices can be achieved by booking online.
 
The event, which this year has a theme of Essential Innovations, will feature an array of top level speakers.

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<p>Sportswoman Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson (above), 11-times Paralympic gold medallist, six-times winner of the London Wheelchair Marathon and now a renowned motivational speaker, provides the keynote address for the event.</p>
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<p>Raymond Bertolotti, private practitioner and clinical director in Biomaterials Science at the University of California, and Richard Simonsen, founding dean at the College of Dental Medicine at Midwestern University, Arizona, lead the array of expert clinical speakers.</p>
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<p>They will be joined by Paul Lambrechts, professor of restorative dentistry and head of department of operative dentistry and dental materials at Leuven University Dental School in Belgium, head of prosthodontics at King’s College London Dental Institute David Bartlett and UK clinical director for the California Centre for Advanced Dental Studies and general dental practitioner Ken Harris.<br /> <br />The event will feature a varied social programme including a black tie dinner at the five star Radisson Edwardian Hotel on Saturday 21 May, Britain’s largest dental industry party at the Tiger Tiger nightclub on Friday 20 May and a complimentary exhibition hall drinks reception on Thursday 20.</p>
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<p>This year’s VDP ball, featuring a drinks reception, three-course meal and entertainment, will be held at the glamorous Palace Hotel. <br /> <br />For further details and to book, visit <a href=http://www.bda.org/conference>www.bda.org/conference</a>.</p>
<p>^1297209600^3654^BDA deadline for early bird booking…^The deadline for ‘early bird’ bookings for British Dental Conference and Exhibition is nearing. Members of the dental commu…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/earlybird.jpg<br />
Migraine therapy – from your dentist^
<p>Only migraine sufferers understand the misery the condition can bring. It is also one of the least well-funded aspects of medicine. What if there was another factor which triggers migraine beyond the expertise of your GP or neurosurgeon?<br /> <br />Migraine is a strange thing. There are so many trigger factors which can bring on the pain.  The problem is that normal medicine deal with treating the chemicals pumped out in the brain, by this time the migraine has already started and it’s like trying to ice skate up hill.<br /> <br />Visual auras, triggering smells and sounds are not abnormal sensory input to the brain, rather it’s your brain processing extra information it normally filters out.</p>
<p>
<p>Long-term sufferers will start off with a short list triggers, be it food, smells or sounds. Gradually over time this list gets longer and longer. Migraine is a problem with how the brain deals with input the chemicals released are a result of this change in how the brain operates.<br /> <br />Patients who suffer with migraine often wake with tension headaches in the morning and rarely ask why they get this, rather accept it as part of the problem.</p>
<p>
<p>They often are early risers, around 6.00am to 6.30am or earlier, and if they have an extra hour to sleep on a weekend they feel even worse when waking.</p>
<p>
<p>Additionally, they feel completely exhausted and feel they just can’t get enough sleep.<br /> <br />Many people who hear about these symptoms suddenly listen with interest as they usually suffer from these fatigue effects also. <br /> <br />The reason for this is quite simple. Tooth clenching and grinding stops you from entering deep, restful sleep. Additionally, this grinding and clenching fatigues the muscles and causes tension headaches.</p>
<p>
<p>If you went to the gym and picked up heavy weights and did bicep curls for eight hours, you’d expect your arms to hurt. This is exactly the same process.<br /> <br />You have no control over clenching and grinding of your teeth. It’s pre-programmed into the same part of the brain that deals with breathing and heart rate.  However with correct management, we can reduce the intensity at which this occurs.</p>
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<p>When people clench and grind their teeth, they overload the sensory input part of the brain. They wake up with this part of the brain effectively fatigued and it takes very little to push this over the edge. The result is a full blown migraine.</p>
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<p>I used to have migraines myself three times per month, since I underwent treatment I’ve not had a single migraine since. This was nearly two years ago.<br /> <br />So if this is the case, why do dentists not undertake this treatment more often?</p>
<p>
<p>It’s because dentists are not trained at undergraduate level to undertake this type of treatment.  It is also not very well understood and is therefore not well delivered. In addition, some dentists offer this type of treatment but are using outdated philosophies.</p>
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<p>I’m fortunate to have had training in the US on this type of treatment. Previously, the best medications for migraines have been either Topamax, amytryptyline or some form of beta blocker.  The result is that these medications effectively sedate you and interrupt your life.</p>
<p>
<p>I have seen patients who have had migraines so severe that they were hospitalised to have CT scans and MRI scans all of which show nothing. They are medicated up to the eyeballs and still have little success. The medications already mentioned can give around a 20% reduction in symptoms. The treatments I can offer have FDA approval in the US as the most effective treatment against migraine and give an 80% reduction in symptoms within six weeks for 75% of people, all without the need for medication. I have seen patients and made them pain free overnight, seen them come off their medications, and even throw their trigger list in the bin. They also feel fully rested and get their life back.</p>
<p>
<p>I’m privileged to have had such extensive training and want to help those who have similar problems as myself, namely migraine. I have even seen patients who have had treatment unsuccessfully with other dentists and made them pain free, it’s the refinement of the treatment which is all important.</p>
<p>
<p>I have even treated a GP who had no idea I could help. I am in fact so confident I can help that I even offer a money back guarantee. I can’t do what a GP or neurosurgeon does and they can’t do what I can do. It’s a team effort. There are many other subtle conditions which give rise to these types of problems, if they’re not addressed properly your results will be seriously limited.</p>
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<hr />
<p>
<p style=text-align: left;><span class=red_smheadfont><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/pav.jpg alt=

Dr Khaira is Beam’s new addition to our Ask the expert panel. His expertise has led him to the lecture circuit in the UK where he gives insight into these problems from a dentist’s perspective to other professionals. His commitment to excellence has led to his advisory board role for a respected specialist oral surgeon.
 
There are other problems that Dr Khaira has also suffered with himself, as he explains: ‘I also have a chronic jaw joint problem and have had pain for very many years.  I truly understand how much of an impact migraines and jaw joint problems can have on your life. My personal experiences left me with continued symptoms after having been treated by numerous specialists and professionals. 

 

Once I started to understand what was going on, I treated myself and the symptoms were fully controlled in three weeks after years of pain. I want to be able to offer a real solution for those who suffer with these conditions so they can have the relief of pain that I have had. That is why I continue to learn and push the boundaries of treatment, so that I can offer life altering therapies.’
 
Dr Khaira currently accepts self-referrals from patients, referrals from GPs, neurologists, chiropractors and oral surgeons.

^1297209600^3655^Migraine therapy – from your dent…^Only migraine sufferers understand the misery the condition can bring. It is also one of the least well-funded aspects of medicine. What if …^
Karren Brady tops the league at dental seminar^

Karren Brady, first lady of football, business icon and right-hand woman to Alan Sugar in his TV show, The Apprentice, will be leading an array of speakers at the 10th World Aesthetic Congress in June.

The UK’s leading aesthetic dentistry event is being held at the Business Design Centre in Islington, north London, on the 17-18 June 2011.

Inspirational speaker Karren Brady was managing director of Birmingham City Football Club from 1993 to 2009 and during that time turned the club’s fortunes around.

In January 2010, Karren was appointed vice chairman of West Ham United FC.

She is a columnist for The Sun newspaper and in November 2010 saw Karren listed in the business category of The Sunday Telegraph’s ‘100 Most Powerful Women in Britain’.

Karren replaced Margaret Mountford as Lord Sugar’s right-hand woman in the most recent series of The Apprentice.

Dentists and their teams will also be treated to a whole host of speakers in clinical and business sessions.

There will also be a panel of speakers and outstanding exhibition with over 70 leading dental companies.

There are more than 20 leading international speakers planned for WAC 2011, including Chris Orr, Mike Miyasaki, Sverker Toreskog, Mike Apa, Brian Chadroff, Gary Zelesky, Sergey Radlinsky and Jason Smithson.

Plus, after what’s set to be an exceptional first day, there is a charity dinner, taking place at the five-star Landmark Hotel, London.

This black tie event is hosted by New Zealand rugby hero, Sean Fitzpatrick and will raise money in order to raise mouth cancer awareness.

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<p><strong>Prices </strong>  <br />Book by 8 April for £100 off a two-day ticket and £50 off a one-day ticket.</p>
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<p><span style=font-family: Calibri,Verdana,Helvetica,Arial;><span style=font-size: 11pt;>For full details visit <a href=http://www.independentseminars.com/wac>www.independentseminars.com/wac</a> or freephone 0800 371652.</span></span><br /> <br /><strong>ONE-DAY EARLY BIRD PRICES</strong><br />Dentist                                                          £305  <br />Subscriber dentist*                                         £269   <br />Team member                                                £125   <br />Subscriber team member*                              £107  <br />Team discount (1 dentist + 2 team members)   £503   <br />Student                                                           £50  <br />Exhibition only FREE  <br />      <br /><strong>TWO-DAY EARLY BIRD PRICES </strong> <br />Dentist                                                           £459  <br /> Subscriber dentist*                                         £403   <br /> Team member                                                £250   <br /> Subscriber team member*                               £220   <br /> Team discount (1 dentist + 2 team members)   £772   <br /> Student                                                           £75  <br /> Exhibition only FREE  <br />   <br /> All prices exclude VAT</p>
<p>*10% discount for subscribers to <em>Private Dentistry</em>, <em>Aesthetic Dentistry Today</em>, <em>Implant Dentistry Today</em>, <em>Endodontic Practice</em>, <em>Private Laboratory</em> and <em>Preventive Dentistry.<br /></em></p>
<p>^1297209600^3656^Karren Brady tops the league at den…^Karren Brady, first lady of football, business icon and right-hand woman to Alan Sugar in his TV show, The Apprentice, will be leading an ar…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/KarrenBrady[1].jpg<br />
Teeth the Musical scoops global film prize^
<p>The team who made a 14-minute film to get kids brushing their teeth is off to Canada this weekend to receive a prize for best educational film at a film festival.</p>
<p>
<p><em>Teeth the Musical</em> DVD has already scooped the 2010 Patron’s Prize at the National  Oral Health Promotion Group annual conference, adding to the 2010  Education Business Award from Somerset County Council.</p>
<p>
<p>Now, the JUMPcuts team will travel to Calgary, Canada, this coming weekend to receive the prize.</p>
<p>
<p>Picture This is one of the leading film festivals in the world for the disabled community and it is JUMPcuts animated film ‘Teeth the Musical’ produced with and for learning disabled young people that has won this coveted award.</p>
<p>Travelling to Canada will be a member of the cast, Bridgwater College student, Freddie Wolfman accompanied by film-maker Tom Stubbs, part of Biggerhouse Film who together with registered charity Somerset Film make up the JUMPcuts partnership.  </p>
<p>Tom Stubbs said: ‘This is a great honour and a fantastic opportunity for Freddie and I to present our film to an international audience, to fly the flag for Somerset creative business and the talent of disabled film-makers.’</p>
<p>Working with fellow Calgary winners Purple Field Productions the film-makers are supported by the local branch of AC Mole and Sons, also Aardman Animation who generously donated an original <em>Wallace and Gromit</em> drawing signed by Nick Park to help fund the visit.</p>
<p>‘Teeth the Musical’ is suitable for learning disabled audiences as well as for primary school students and is available on DVD from <a href=http://www.jumpcuts.org.uk>www.jumpcuts.org.uk</a>. </p>
<p>A Bristol-based senior dental officer said this week: ‘I have never seen anything like ‘Teeth the Musical’ anywhere else. Absolutely fantastic in all respects’.</p>
<p>
<p>To see the making of <em>Teeth – The Musical</em>, click <a href=http://www.jumpcuts.org.uk/film_library?Video=4>here</a><br /><span style=font-family: Calibri,Verdana,Helvetica,Arial;><span style=font-size: 11pt;><span style=color: #0000ff;><span style=text-decoration: underline;><a href=http://www.jumpcuts.org.uk/film_library?Video=4></a></span></span></span></span></p>
<p>^1297209600^3657^Teeth the Musical scoops global fil…^The team who made a 14-minute film to get kids brushing their teeth is off to Canada this weekend to receive a prize for best educational fi…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Teeth-the-musical—photo.png<br />
Another step on the stairway to success^
<p>Following its establishment at the University of Birmingham in 2010, the Denplan Stairway Programme has now been recognised by another prestigious organisation – the Faculty of General Dental Practice (FGDP (UK)).</p>
<p>
<p>Now, in addition to allowing members to accumulate 20 credits towards the MSc in Primary Dental Care at Birmingham University, the programme is now approved by the FGDP (UK) for accreditation towards its ‘Career Pathway’.</p>
<p>
<p>Dentists achieving the Denplan Stairway Award can claim 20 credits towards Stage 2 of the Pathway (10 clinical plus 10 ‘other’ credits).</p>
<p>
<p>Denplan chief dental officer, Roger Matthews, says: ‘This recognition by the FGDP (UK) is further endorsement of the value of the Denplan Stairway Programme for dentists.</p>
<p>
<p>‘It was specifically designed to support training and development, as well as offering a unique opportunity to gain qualifications recognised by peers as well as patients.’</p>
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<p>The Denplan Stairway Programme is a structured development programme designed to encompass professional education and development in a relevant and practical format.</p>
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<p>Each unit comprising a study day and practice project on clinical and practice management aspects of running a practice.</p>
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<p>For information on the Denplan Stairway Programme, visit <a href=http://www.denplan.co.uk/dentists/training>www.denplan.co.uk/dentists/training</a> or call the Denplan Training Team on 0800 587 5533.</p>
<p>^1297209600^3658^Another step on the stairway to suc…^Following its establishment at the University of Birmingham in 2010, the Denplan Stairway Programme has now been recognised by another prest…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/playmobil-stairs.jpg<br />
Young women demand BlackBerry Botox ^
<p>Younger women may have as much reason to worry about their worry lines as the older generation.</p>
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<p>That’s according to cosmetic durgeon Dr Jean-Louis Sebagh who found many are developing premature wrinkles from staring at their smartphones.</p>
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<p>He says peering at a small screen causes your face to scrunch up, creating an area of tension around and between the brows.</p>
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<p>The London-based anti-ageing expert said women were then resorting to Botox to smooth out the fine facial lines.</p>
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<p>Dr Sebagh said the phenomenon ‘can be seen on anyone who has and regularly checks a BlackBerry or iPhone.’</p>
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<p>But he told the <em>Evening Standard</em>: ‘It’s easily rectified with the light use of Botox.’</p>
<p>
<p>Experts receommend a daily DIY face massage to ease the condition.</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>^1297209600^3659^Young women demand BlackBerry Botox…^Younger women may have as much reason to worry about their worry lines as the older generation.That’s according to cosmetic durgeon Dr Jean-…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/brunette.png<br />
Does your oral health care tick all the boxes?^
<p>Oral  health promotion is crucial to the success of a practice as well as to the  health of the population.</p>
<p> The  Department of Health’s <em>Delivering Better  Oral Health, an evidence-based toolkit</em> and Professor  Jimmy Steele’s review of NHS dentistry both talk about  oral health and quality of  care as the way forward. </p>
<p>
<p>But, in taking care of patients’ oral health, there can be some conditions which are tricky to diagnose – and treat.</p>
<p>
<p>Pinpointing the root cause of tooth sensitivity, for example, can be tricky, especially as there can be many factors. </p>
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<p>Tooth sensitivity can impact on the lives of people at various times with the levels of discomfort varying from twinges in the tooth or teeth to sharp shooting pains which can last for hours.</p>
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<p>Sometimes, sensitivity can be caused by of hot, cold or sweet foods and drinks.</p>
<p>
<p>The condition occurs when the receding tissue exposes the dentinal channels that, in turn, allow hot, cold or sweet stimuli to touch the nerves in the tooth, which causes discomfort and pain.  </p>
<p>
<p>There are a number of desensitising products and toothpastes for tooth sensitivity which can relieve the symptoms. </p>
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<p>In this anonymous survey, we ask you to let us know which toothpastes you recommend to patients suffering with tooth sensitivity. It only takes a minute!</p>
<p>
<p>Please click <a href=../../partners/gskquestionnaire/index.php>here</a> to take part.</p>
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<p>Thank you <br /><span style=font-size: 11pt; font-family: Arial;> </span></p>
<p>^1297296000^3660^Does your oral health care tick all…^Oral  health promotion is crucial to the success of a practice as well as to the  health of the population.  The  Department of Health’s Del…^<br />
Mouth cancer to be debated on world stage^
<p>The second North American/Global Dental Hygiene Research Conference is being held in Maryland, USA, from 20 to 22 October 2011.</p>
<p>
<p>During this time dental hygienists from around the world will share their research, and invited speakers will present new research related to oral cancer, smoking cessation interventions, bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis and remineralisation therapies.</p>
<p>Associate director of the National Center for Dental Hygiene Research & Practice, Ann Spolarich, lent her support to finding a cure for the disease.</p>
<p>She said: ‘During one of the plenary sessions at the conference, a leading international expert will explore the state of the science regarding oral cancer risk assessment, diagnosis and management, including a discussion about the reliability and validity of available in-office oral cancer screening tests.  </p>
<p>‘Further, results from a major practice-based research study that examines how dental hygienists can best provide tobacco cessation counselling will be presented.  It is also quite likely that original research papers submitted for oral and poster presentations will address oral cancer and tobacco use.’</p>
<p>Chief executive of the International Dental Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter, expressed his delight at oral cancer appearing on the agenda.  </p>
<p>Dr Carter said: ‘Through Mouth Cancer Action Month we have campaigned in the UK for greater awareness of oral cancer for several years. The worldwide challenge is equally daunting and the conference will provide an excellent opportunity to increase awareness of the disease and hopefully stimulate debate on new approaches to prevention, diagnosis and treatment.’</p>
<p>For a registration form, an abstract submission form (due 15 March) and further information please email Jane Forrest at <a href=mailto:jforrest@usc.edu>jforrest@usc.edu</a> or Ann Spolarich at <a href=mailto:AnnEshSpo@aol.com>AnnEshSpo@aol.com</a>.</p>
<p>^1297296000^3662^Mouth cancer to be debated on world…^The second North American/Global Dental Hygiene Research Conference is being held in Maryland, USA, from 20 to 22 October 2011.During this t…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Mouth-Cancer-Enamel-Ribbon.jpg<br />
30 years and counting for loyal dental nurse^
<p>A dental practice in Derbyshire has just celebrated 30 years of loyal service from one of its dental nurses.</p>
<p>
<p>Lorraine Bates has worked at Alexandra Dental Care in Swadlkincote near Burton on Trent for three decades. </p>
<p>Her remarkable loyalty was celebrated when the team surprised her in the staff meeting – held exactly 30 years to the day that she started back in February 1981.</p>
<p>Lorraine had no idea that the team was aware of the 30-year anniversary!</p>
<p>To mark the three decades of service, Lorraine was presented with a diamond wristwatch and an engraved cut crystal bowl.  </p>
<p>Lorraine says: ‘Dentistry has changed an awful lot, there is now so much technology and new gadgets, things that that we would never of dreamed of in the past.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Above all, the one thing I always remember is that it’s people that matter most. I always try to make patients comfortable and make a trip to the dentist less frightening.</p>
<p>‘Even after 30 years I am still learning, dentistry is exciting and interesting; I don’t think I will ever get bored of it.’   </p>
<p>Dentist Yogi Savania adds: ‘As well as providing quality dentistry, our ultimate aim is to treat patients with care, compassion and kindness.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Lorraine is so sympathetic and reassuring with our patients, she has seen many patients who are nervous of treatment and she has helped them overcome their fears with her kind and caring nature. She is an asset to our practice, her experience and knowledge is priceless.’</p>
<p>^1297296000^3661^30 years and counting for loyal den…^A dental practice in Derbyshire has just celebrated 30 years of loyal service from one of its dental nurses.Lorraine Bates has worked at Ale…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/lorraine-014.jpg<br />
Kneads must for a stressful life^
<p>An innovative product allows users to carry out various massage moves on themselves or another, anytime and anywhere.</p>
<p>
<p>It can be used over clothes, directly onto the skin with oil or even in the shower with soap and water.<br /> <br />The Kneader is simple, stylish and easy-to-use.</p>
<p>
<p>It comes with an instructional manual and DVD, so users can build up their own massage style and confidence, so they massage well and regularly for a less-stressed way of life.  </p>
<p>It’s also the perfect gift option – a new, healthy answer to that old question of ‘what do I get them?’.<br /> <br />The Kneader is a beautifully designed new product created by a professional therapist who is on a mission to make massage a regular part of everyone’s life.</p>
<p>Una Tucker came up with the idea for The Kneader after failing to find a simple and affordable, hand-held massage tool that would enable her clients to massage regularly and effectively between their professional sessions.</p>
<p>Anyone can use it to self-massage or massage another. The product comes with a comprehensive instructional manual, DVD and website support.</p>
<p>It mimics various key movements of a professional massage. Every part of the tool is useable and multi-functional.</p>
<p>The Kneader is made from hard-wearing acrylic, so it’s durable and washable. No moving parts or batteries required.</p>
<p>It can be used to massage over clothes or directly onto the skin with suitable oils or lubricants – it’s also great in the shower with soap and water.</p>
<p>The beautiful Kneader is a great gift option for any time or occasion: pregnancy, sports, travel, at work and/or for Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day, birthdays, Christmas, etc.</p>
<p>The Kneader is more essential than ever in today’s busy and financially stretched world.</p>
<p>‘Massage promotes a general feeling of well-being and relaxation, so even five minutes a day in front of the telly or at your desk is really good for you,’ says Una.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Although nothing can take the place of a professional massage, not everyone can afford regular sessions. With The Kneader, people can massage themselves or someone else regularly, for a healthier way of life.’.</p>
<p>The Kneader is available for £25 from <a href=http://www.kneadsmust.com>www.kneadsmust.com</a> or through Amazon at www.amazon.co.uk.</p>
<p>^1297296000^3664^Kneads must for a stressful life^An innovative product allows users to carry out various massage moves on themselves or another, anytime and anywhere.It can be used over clo…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/kneader.jpg<br />
Confident winners^
<p>A Gloucestershire dental practice has been recognised as the practice with the perfect preventive factor.</p>
<p>
<p>Readers at www.preventivedentistry.co.uk and of the dental journal, <em>Preventive Dentistry</em>, voted Confident Dental Care on London Road, Stroud in Gloucestershire, the Preventive Practice of the Year 2010.</p>
<p>
<p>Practice manager, Natalie Wooldridge, welcomed the good news.</p>
<p>
<p>She said: ‘We’re all very excited and very proud to have won this award. It’s super news and really means a lot as the whole team really have put a lot of work into this to ensure patients get the correct care they need – and deserve!’</p>
<p>
<p>The team is made up of joint principal dentists Ewa Rozwadowska and Colin Neil, practice manager Natalie Wooldridge, dental hygienists Jane Milsom and Jocelyn Harding, senior nurse/treatment co-ordinator Rowan Braddick, senior patient advisor Lesley Reed, patient advisor Sue Purchase, and dental nurses Cheryl Goodenough, Kelly Richards, Sue Hayden and Hannah Barrett.</p>
<p>
<p>The practice will be now feature in several articles in <em>Preventive Dentistry</em> as an example of excellence to dental practitioners across the UK.</p>
<p>
<p>The practice also wins £500 to spend as it wishes, a gift generously given by sponsors, Oral-B.</p>
<p>
<p>The full story on Confident Dental Care’s win – with photos – will feature in the March issue of <em>Preventive Dentistry</em>.</p>
<p>
<p>Runners up were London-based Weymouth Street Paediatric Dentistry, a private practice dedicated to children and adolescents.</p>
<p>
<p>This practice was established in 1973 and its main emphasis is on total oral care within a happy and friendly environment.</p>
<p>
<p>The team is made up of Dr John F Roberts, Dr Noushin Attari, who qualified as a specialist in paediatric dentistry in 2001, and hygienists Sophie Guenin, Victoria Jones, Elizabeth Kotsoumbus, Carolina Carrera and Louise Winder. Plus, receptionist Sharon Fitzsimmons and practice manager Claire Fitzsimmons.</p>
<p>
<p>you can now subscribe to <em>Preventive Dentistry</em> magazine at the exceptional low price of £39! (was £59, SAVE 35%)</p>
<p>
<p>• One year’s subscription (print) which is six issues costs £39</p>
<p>
<p>• Three years’ subscription (print) which is 18 issues costs £78.</p>
<p>
<p>Call the <em>Preventive Dentistry</em> team on 01923 851771 or email fmc@escosubs.co.uk.</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<hr />
<p>
<p><strong><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Oral-B-Logo.png alt=

Thanks to our sponsor
Thank you to our official sponsor, Oral-B. Without this support, the award would not be possible.

 

 

 

 

 

^1297296000^3663^Confident winners^A Gloucestershire dental practice has been recognised as the practice with the perfect preventive factor.Readers at www.preventivedentistry….^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Confident.jpg
One of your five a day is good for kissing, too!^

Best to get minty fresh or have a piece of fruit, avoid mornings and smoking if you’re looking to have a snog this Valentine’s Day.

That’s according to a new survey carried out by the No Smoking Day charity that found more than a third of the nation would prefer a minty kiss (38%), with a fifth (20%) preferring to get fruity when having a smooch.

 width=370 height=250 /></p>
<p>
<p>Katy Perry’s <em>I Kissed a Girl</em> may have influenced the 11% of men who declared cherry or other flavoured chapsticks as their favourite flavour when locking lips.</p>
<p>
<p>With No Smoking Day under a month away (Wednesday 9 March), the charity has issued the findings to give another incentive to the 63%* of British smokers who wish to kiss their habit goodbye.</p>
<p>
<p>Over half the nation (57%) would be put off kissing by smokers’ breath (56% of men and 58% of women) and so the charity believes not only would smokers improve their health by quitting but potentially their love lives.</p>
<p>
<p>Only morning breath was more unpopular than tobacco breath with 59% of people stating it would put them off.</p>
<p>
<p>Anyone booking a romantic dinner this weekend may like to consider that garlic and onion were the third least liked flavour when kissing someone (51%).</p>
<p>
<p>Rachel Martin, from the No Smoking Day charity, says: ‘Everyone has their own reasons for quitting and as over a quarter of single people in the UK smoke we felt a chance to enhance their love life may be the incentive they need to kiss their smoking habit goodbye.’</p>
<p>
<p>Finding the right partner to help you quit doesn’t have to be as difficult as finding your true love which is why No Smoking Day runs <a href=http://www.wequit.co.uk>www.wequit.co.uk</a> an online hub for quitters to find out different ways to quit and to chat online with each other to gain support and advice.</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<hr />
<p>
<p>* Figures from General Household Survey 2009</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>^1297296000^3665^One of your five a day is good for …^Best to get minty fresh or have a piece of fruit, avoid mornings and smoking if you’re looking to have a snog this Valentine’s Day.That’s ac…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/kiss-flower.jpg<br />
Looking after your baby’s first teeth^
<p>Parents are a child’s first teachers in life, and they play a significant role in maintaining their child’s overall health. <br /> <br />Dentists encourages parents to introduce good oral health habits to their children during infancy.</p>
<p>
<p>Tooth decay affects children in the western world more than any other chronic infectious disease, highlighting the need for thorough oral care and regular dental visits.</p>
<p>
<p>The ideal time for a child to visit the dentist is six months after the child’s first teeth erupt.</p>
<p>
<p>During this initial visit, a dentist will be able to examine the development of the child’s mouth.</p>
<p>
<p>Academy of General Dentistry spokesperson, Steven A Ghareeb, says: ‘Parents are surprised when I tell them that their infants can develop tooth decay and cavities soon after their teeth first appear.</p>
<p>
<p>‘We usually call this baby bottle tooth decay, which is caused by the long-term exposure to liquids containing sugars like milk, formula, and fruit juice.’</p>
<p>
<p>In addition to tooth decay, other dental problems, such as teething irritations, gum disease, and prolonged thumb or pacifier sucking, often start early. The sooner the child visits a dentist, the better.</p>
<p>
<p>There are many things that parents can do with their child at home to maintain good oral health:<br />Clean your infant’s gums with a clean, damp cloth twice a day.</p>
<p>
<p>Ask your dentist when you may begin to rub a tiny dab of toothpaste on your child’s gums. Doing so will help your child become accustomed to the flavor of toothpaste.</p>
<p>
<p>As soon as the first teeth come in, begin brushing them with a small, soft-bristled toothbrush and a pea-sized dab of fluoride toothpaste.</p>
<p>
<p>Help a young child brush at night, which is the most important time to brush, due to lower salivary flow during sleep and higher susceptibility to cavities and plaque.</p>
<p>
<p>By approximately age five, your child can learn to brush his or her teeth with proper parental instruction and supervision. <br /> <br />‘The best way to teach a child how to brush is to lead by your good example,’ says Dr Ghareeb.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Allowing your child to watch you brush your teeth teaches the importance of good oral hygiene.’</p>
<p>
<p>Children, like adults, should see the dentist every six months. Some dentists may schedule interim visits for every three months when the child is very young to build the child’s comfort and confidence levels or for treatment needs.</p>
<p>^1297382400^3666^Looking after your baby’s first tee…^Parents are a child’s first teachers in life, and they play a significant role in maintaining their child’s overall health.  Dentists e…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/babydribble.jpg<br />
Scheinstock – music to Bridge2Aid’s ears…^
<p>How did it get to be February already? It felt like I blinked and January was over!<br /> <br />The fact that it’s now less than nine weeks before myself and 12 others go to Tanzania on behalf of Bridge2Aid makes it a little bit more real and a whole lot more daunting.<br /> <br />I think the rest of the group are feeling the clock ticking, too, with everyone rallying with new ways to raise the much-needed money to fund the work that will be carried out during the two-week trip.<br /> <br />With the new year also comes some exciting new events. At the end of the month we have Scheinstock, a full-throttle 1970s-inspired rock event with some unlikely members of the dental industry making cameo appearances in the band.</p>
<p>
<p style=text-align: right;><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Scheinstock-poster.jpg alt=

March holds the promise of a fuel-filled go-karting frenzy and tennis balls and tea towels are still going strong. I think the group as a whole will be reminded of this trip, every time we visit a family member and wash up!
 
It’s not just the big events that raise the money but the day-to-day effort of every member of the team, contacting not only friends and family but members of our industry to help raise awareness for our trip and the charity itself, as well as a few pennies for the pot of course.
 
We all tipped our hats to Nadene this week who received a substantial donation from a very generous dental practice.

As with any modern woman, Nadene manages to juggle home, children, work and now fundraising with flair. The demanding role of product manager at Software of Excellence takes her the length and breadth of the UK.

When asked why she wanted to add yet another ‘ball’ to juggle with the Tanzania trip, Nadene said: ‘I heard about Bridge2Aid several years ago, a team was preparing to travel to Tanzania and were looking for volunteers to join them.

‘At the time the teenagers were a bit young to be away from for too long so I was unable to participate. I decided to join the team this time as I feel that everyday people like me only need to give a little of their time to really make a difference to the lives of the people in this community.

‘The Bridge2Aid charity is actually working with the people at the Bukumbi Care Centre, encouraging them to become involved in making lasting changes. This makes me feel that my small input will help build the foundations towards continued improvement in providing on-going support and access to medical and dental treatment for these families.’
 
However, it’s not only the sizeable donations that help towards our final target and Nadene has been selling everything from tea towels, scratch cards even the odd bribe with baked goods for her team to support dress down Friday.

‘My motto is “give it a go” and someone will show interest and want to get involved with the fundraising,’ says Nadene.
 
I asked what she hoped to get out of the trip and I think she echoes many of the group, especially those who have never been before.

‘I imagine it will be quite emotional and sad and maybe even shocking at times, however I am a strong believer that inner strength, personality and a sense of humour can pull us through most of the experiences that life throws at us and I hope I can learn an awful lot from the people in the community during my visit and I’m sure there will be lots of smiles, too!’

So, the countdown continues, now that ‘buy Christmas presents’ and ‘join a gym’ has been ticked off the list, we add ‘get immunisation sorted’ and ‘sell more tickets’ instead.

Under the blind panic that has started to creep in, there is a flutter of nervous excitement, too, with the knowledge that we are really going to do this and help people and that feels quite good.

Now all we need is the support of those who believe in what we are doing as much as we do, and I assure you that every penny donated is truly appreciated.

To donate to the Bridge2Aid Tanzania trip, please click here.

Or if you’re at a loose end on Friday 25 February, you’re welcome to come and join the festivities at Scheinstock. Please call Ellie Nightingale for tickets on 07971 128 002 or email [email protected]

 


A little background
Kigongo Primary School is situated 2km from Bukumbi Care Centre in the village of Kigongo.  Kigongo is a busy village due to the ferry that takes foot passengers and cars over to Busisi, and the road that leads onto Geita and Rwanda.

Since surfacing the road in August, there is now more traffic and passing trade. Kigongo Primary School has just over 600 students, with 90 of the students from or connected to Bukumbi Care Centre. The rest of the children come from the surrounding village which is also very deprived. B2A has supported the children with uniforms, sports kits, balls and other equipment. We are also working with the school management to provide teacher training so that the whole school benefits. One of the main issues at the school is that its classrooms are in a very poor state which does not make a good learning environment.

The concrete floors and walls in the classrooms are bare, cracked and crumbling, the wire and mesh in the windows is ripped/broken, if there at all, and children are sharing three or four to a desk or often sitting on the bare concrete floors.

The school itself was built about 15 years ago by another NGO because of the overcrowding at Bukumbi Primary School. Unfortunately the classrooms have fallen into disrepair due to funding problems.  Since 2009 we have renovated two of the classrooms but the others are in a desperate state.

 

Before the Henry Schein team arrives, the floors of the classroom will be repaired or re-laid and the wire and mesh in the windows replaced. New desks will also be made. We also hope to have football goals and a netball posts made.

When the team arrives, it will have a huge task of cleaning the classrooms, painting the walls, windows, doors, blackboards and designing and painting lots of educational murals, such as number lines, alphabets, maps and diagrams.

^1297382400^3667^Scheinstock – music to Bridge2Aid…^How did it get to be February already? It felt like I blinked and January was over! The fact that it’s now less than nine weeks b…^
TePes and skis for dental reward winners^

Imagine being told you have won an all inclusive weekend holiday to a place where snow-capped mountains line the horizon and tranquillity exceeds all expectations with a silence that is deafening. That is what eight people were told in September of last year! 
 
Molar Ltd entered all their reward scheme entrants into a prize draw for two practices to send four members of their team to one of the most stunningly beautiful corners of the world, Klocka Fjällgård, located on a 350-hectare private estate in Jämtland, North Sweden. None of the winners could possibly have contemplated any of the experiences that were about to be bestowed upon them. 
 
On Thursday 13 January 2011, four members of Hafren House Dental Practice in Derbyshire and four members of Pure Dental Solutions in Stafford were escorted, by myself and Andrew Rose from Molar Ltd, from Birmingham airport to Trondheim, Norway, where they were met by Molar’s managing director, Stefan Viklund. We were then driven to what would be our sub-arctic home for the next three days.
 
Gasps of amazement were heard when pulling up to the snow-covered fairytale land which is Klocka Fjällgård. Glowing candles lined the path to the main house and we were all shown to each of our rooms before sitting down to a delectable meal prepared by Klocka’s acclaimed Chef, Anders.

Freshly caught salmon and Arctic char, from the surrounding rivers and lakes, together with reindeer and elk were all exquisitely prepared as part of the three-course meals each evening. After dinner we relaxed in the library with a nightcap before lighting our wood burning fires in our rooms and settling down for a good night’s slumber! From this moment on it was a whirlwind of experiences making the stay feel a lot longer than just one weekend!

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<p>
<p>Ice-hole fishing and snowmobile riding (above) with Stefan’s son, Alex Viklund, was first on the agenda for half the group on Friday morning, while the other half, none of whom had skied before, were taken to the slopes of Åre and successfully taught to ski by Natalie Viklund, Stefan’s very patient daughter (and I really can’t stress ‘very patient’ enough)!</p>
<p>
<p>Later that day, both groups then met at Tännforsen, where we were shown around the hand made igloo and given the chance to walk under a magnificent frozen waterfall. Here all members had a go at demonstrating their dexterity by carving their very own drinking glass from ice while reminiscing about wax carving in their dental student days.</p>
<p>
<p>With an array of sparkling goblets, some found it too difficult to leave their achievements behind – after smuggling them back to Klocka they celebrated their accomplishments by putting the ice vessels to the test!</p>
<p>
<p>Saturday breakfast was disturbed by raucous barks as the group discovered that dog sledging was the first activity of the day.  Out over the ice covered lakes and through the woods we all went being pulled by an excitable pack of huskies before settling around the log fire within a tepee (and by this I mean a ‘conical tent traditionally made of animal skins or birch bark’ rather than a giant green TePe interdental Brush) to enjoy reindeer and chili stew with crusty bread – much appreciated in temperatures of -17!</p>
<p>
<p>As the dogs had retired for the day after the morning ride, cross-country skiing was one option of getting back to the house and for those that didn’t fancy that, it was back on the snow mobiles.<br /> <br />While some enjoyed the sauna followed by jumping into the snow, others either relaxed in the house with a hot drink and a book or went walking around the vast countryside before sitting down to the last evening meal at Klocka.<br /> <br />We all left Klocka at 11.00am on the Sunday morning, some with tears but all pledging to return again one day.</p>
<p>
<p>The welcoming environment, created by Marianne, Stefan and the team, together with the beautiful and tranquil surrounding, left people speechless and emotional. So to Marianne and Stefan we all say ‘tusen tack’!<br /> <br />All the words I have used to describe Klocka and the many experiences do not give justice so to help express the many feelings experienced I asked the group to write down words they would use to portray their weekend – exhilarating, once in a lifetime experience, stunningly beautiful, an emotional experience… but to truly appreciate this little bit of paradise we can only say ‘go there for yourself’!<br /> <br />For more information, email info@klockafjallgard.com.</p>
<p>
<hr />
<p>
<p>Molar Ltd<br />01934 710022<br />info@molarltd.co.uk<br /><a href=http://www.molarltd.co.uk >www.molarltd.co.uk </a></p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>^1297382400^3668^TePes and skis for dental reward wi…^Imagine being told you have won an all inclusive weekend holiday to a place where snow-capped mountains line the horizon and tranquillity ex…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/molarski.jpg<br />
The secret to getting your dental patient on side^
<p>Instilling a proactive attitude towards ‘oral health for life’ in patients can be challenging at the best of times, particularly if statistics from public opinion surveys such as that of the British Dental Health Foundation are anything to go by.</p>
<p>
<p>As experts will tell you, there is a whole area of science devoted to the psychology of behaviour change, providing a wealth of knowledge that can be tapped into when trying to educate and motivate patients.</p>
<p>
<p>Along with newly qualified teachers, many dental health professionals are acutely aware that one needs to employ every trick in the book when it comes to engaging and influencing patients and getting them to take more responsibility for their oral hygiene, particularly where periodontal health is concerned.</p>
<p>
<p>According to Kirsten Warrer DDS. Ph.D., associate professor of periodontology at the Royal Dental College, University of Aarhus in Denmark, it isn’t just that patients are set in their ways.</p>
<p>
<p>Patient apathy can be a real impediment to eliminating bad habits but Dr Warrer feels that it is also often that the clinician concerned has not been exposed to proven strategies for success when it comes to communicating more effectively with their patients.</p>
<p>
<p>Naturally, busy clinicians don’t always have the time to acquire such specialist skills, often gained through trial and error over years of practise, particularly when a patient’s periodontal health is at stake.</p>
<p>
<p>Fortunately, pedagogical experts at Hamburg University in Germany have pooled all their knowledge and skills in this area to develop an innovative one-to-one patient education system called iTOP (which stands for ‘individually taught oral prevention’) and available through Curaprox, that aims to gradually initiate dental care professionals into the secrets behind effective patient coaching.</p>
<p>
<p>iTOP consists of three flexible modules  – Introductory, Advanced and Top Level (Instructor) – that allow dental professionals to gradually build on their teaching skills, with the Advanced and Top levels specifically developed for lecturing dentists and hygienists.</p>
<p>
<p>Delegates can choose to take the Introductory course on its own or progress through to Instructor level, depending on their own career objectives.</p>
<p>
<p>UK dental professionals keen to discover more about how this revolutionary system can empower their patients and encourage better attendance, will be able to catch an iTOP course in their area during 2011.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Warrer will be leading several Introductory and Advanced iTOP sessions providing up to 10 hours of verifiable CPD, as well as discussing the challenges of patient compliance when it comes to periodontal disease, at several venues around the country, including London and Macclesfield throughout the year.</p>
<p>
<p>Planned dates so far include:</p>
<p>
<p>• iTOP Introductory 15 and 16 April 2011 at Shrigley Hall, Macclesfield in Cheshire</p>
<p>
<p>• iTOP Introductory 17 and 18 June 2011 at Walton Hall in Warwickshire</p>
<p>
<p>• Advanced iTOP 16 and 17 September 2011 at Walton Hall in Warwickshire</p>
<p>
<p>• iTOP Introductory 11 and 12 November 2011 at London (location to be announced)</p>
<p>
<p>iTOP courses specifically focused on how to get patients to comply with implant care and maintenance instructions (counting towards 7 hours of verifiable CPD), are also planned for the following dates and venues:</p>
<p>
<p>• Monday 13 June – Edinburgh Carlton Hotel</p>
<p>
<p>• Tuesday 14 June – Shrigley Hall Hotel, Cheshire</p>
<p>
<p>• Wednesday 15 June – Hendon Hall, London</p>
<p>
<p>• Thursday 16 June – Walton Hall Hotel, Stratford upon Avon</p>
<p>
<p>Cost £225.00 + VAT per delegate.</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<hr />
<p>
<p> For more information on the iTOP training system, or to book, contact Curaprox on   01480 862084 or email info@curaprox.co.uk or visit <a href=http://www.curaprox.co.uk>www.curaprox.co.uk</a></p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>^1297382400^3669^The secret to getting your dental p…^Instilling a proactive attitude towards ‘oral health for life’ in patients can be challenging at the best of times, particularly…^<br />
Smile and hopes^
<p>Thanks to very active local contacts in Cambodia, Dentaid has supplied equipment to dental clinics and a dental nurses’ college in the capital.</p>
<p>
<p>The next step for the charity was to set up the Smiles and Hopes project to raise funds for dental and medical care for children living in orphanages in Phnom Penh.<br /> <br />To anyone in the UK, life in an orphanage seems a pretty bleak prospect.</p>
<p>
<p>But to children living in one of more than 100 orphanages in Cambodia’s capital city, Phnom Penh, it is far better than the life they could expect in the community. <br /> <br />The rule of the Khmer Rouge left Cambodia one of the poorest countries on earth.</p>
<p>
<p>Ownership of property was abolished and families lost the tiny plots from which they eked a living.</p>
<p>
<p>All paper records were destroyed and, although families may be occupying the plot they have held for generations, developers are coming in and claiming land.</p>
<p>
<p>For people living on the breadline, there is little they can do to oppose those with money and power. <br /> <br />As so often, the residue of war has left the country littered with land mines which still kill many people. That fact, along with a scarcity of health resources, the incidence of AIDS and the diseases found in any impoverished community with poor sanitation all contribute to the high death rate. It’s estimated that around 52,000 Cambodian children have lost both parents.</p>
<p>
<p>For them, prospects are indeed bleak. <br /> <br />Diane Platt, Dentaid’s Head of Fundraising, recently accompanied a trek of volunteers to Vietnam and decided to add on a week to see the work in Cambodia at first hand and visit three orphanages in Phnom Penh. She relates what she saw. <br /> <br />The orphanages become the children’s home in the truest sense. They are warm and homely places where groups of five or six children live in small houses with a housemother. They attend school, not an option for the vast majority of Cambodian children who will be working from the age of five or six to contribute to the family’s income.</p>
<p>
<p>Once in the orphanage they have regular meals, clean clothes, medical care and, thanks to Dentaid’s Smiles and Hopes campaign, they now have dental care.<br /> <br />Most Cambodian children have little or no access to dental treatment and their rates of decay are among the highest in the world.</p>
<p>
<p>The average five-year-old in Phnom Penh has 10 decayed teeth, and a recent study of 16-18 year-olds showed that they had an average of six decayed permanent teeth.  By the age of 15, many young people need to have permanent teeth extracted, with the inevitable resulting impact on the quality of life.<br /> <br />Clinics equipped by Dentaid offer free treatment to the orphans but they don’t have the facilities to care for all the children and other clinics have to charge.</p>
<p>
<p>Compared with the UK, the cost in miniscule, just £500 is enough to provide medical and dental care for a whole orphanage for a year. But it’s money which has to be found.  <br /> <br />Once in the care of an orphanage, children stay there until they are 18. Unlike the UK, they get continued support while they are in full time education and are offered interest free loans to purchase a moped, the usual means of transport around the city.<br /> <br />The closeness of the ties they build is demonstrated by the fact that most of them stay in touch throughout their lives and many come back to work at the orphanage which raised them. <br /> </p>
<hr />
<p>If you would like to contribute to the work in Cambodia with money or equipment please contact Diane Platt on 01794 324249 or by email diane@dentaid.org.</p>
<p>
<p><span class=blue_smheadfont>* The charity has an urgent request out for 90 autoclaves for Cambodia so they are especially welcome.<br /> </span><br /> <br /> <br /> </p>
<p>^1297382400^3670^Smile and hopes^Thanks to very active local contacts in Cambodia, Dentaid has supplied equipment to dental clinics and a dental nurses’ college in the…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/dentaidgirl.jpg<br />
Tooth loss link to breast cancer^
<p>A new study suggests that women may be over 11 times more likely to suffer from breast cancer if they have missing teeth and gum disease.</p>
<p>
<p>The study [1], carried out by the Karolinska Institute in Sweden on more than 3,000 patients, showed that out of the 41 people who developed breast cancer those who had gum disease and loss of teeth were 11 times more likely to develop cancer.</p>
<p>
<p>As this appears to be the first study presenting such findings, chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter, believes more needs to be done in order to confirm the results.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Carter says: ‘If future studies can also testify to the link between missing teeth and breast cancer, more has to be done to raise public awareness on the issue. The British Dental Health Foundation has a history of campaigning for better oral health, and the findings presented in the study indicate another clear link between your general and oral health.’</p>
<p>
<hr />
<p>
<p>[1] Söder, B, Yakob, M, Meurman, J, Andersson, L, Klinge, B, Söder, P, 8 October 2010, ‘Periodontal disease may associate with breast cancer’, Karolinska Institute, Sweden. The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between periodontal (gum) disease and the prevalence of breast cancer in 3273 randomly selected subjects aged 30–40. Breast cancer incidence was registered from 1985 to 2001 according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases criteria. At baseline, 1676 individuals also underwent a clinical oral examination (Group A) whereas 1597 subjects were not clinically examined but were registered (Group B). The associations between breast cancer, periodontal disease, and missing molars were determined using multiple logistic regression models with several background variables and known risk factors for cancer.</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>^1297382400^3671^Tooth loss link to breast cancer^A new study suggests that women may be over 11 times more likely to suffer from breast cancer if they have missing teeth and gum disease.The…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/ab.jpg<br />
Cold water poured on fluoridation appeal^
<p>A local health authority’s plans for the fluoridation of a city’s tap water was not unlawful, the High Court has ruled.</p>
<p>A judge rejected an appeal by Southampton resident Geraldine Milner and it was ruled that there was no substance in any of the grounds of complaint and the legal challenge must be dismissed.</p>
<p>
<p>Geraldine Milner was opposed  to the proposals because of uncertainties regarding long-term health  risks associated with fluoridation, as well as concerns with regard to  the possible adverse environmental effects.</p>
<p>She also considers  that more targeted and less intrusive measures should be used to deal  with problems of tooth decay in the Southampton area.</p>
<p>Ms Milner brought her application for judicial review backed by local anti-fluoride campaign groups in Hampshire.</p>
<p>The South Central Strategic Health Authority instructed the local water authority to forge ahead with fluoridation in February 2009.</p>
<p>Other local authorities had put other fluoridation schemes on hold pending the outcome of the case.</p>
<p>The British Dental Association (BDA) welcomed today’s decision to allow the SHA to proceed with its proposed scheme to fluoridate water in Southampton and parts of South West Hampshire.<br /> <br />The BDA believes that fluoridation will play an important role in reducing the worryingly high levels of dental decay in Southampton where as many as 42% of five-year olds have experienced tooth decay.</p>
<p>
<p>Despite a range of oral health measures used by Southampton City primary care trust to reduce these high levels of tooth decay and to address health inequalities, more than 520 children in Southampton still required general anaesthetic to have a total of 2,900 teeth extracted in 2007.<br /> <br />Commenting on the outcome, BDA scientific adviser Professor Damien Walmsley said: ‘The BDA is pleased with the result because it is likely to encourage consultation on similar schemes in other parts of the country where fluoride could help address the poor dental health of the population.<br /> <br />‘A recent European summary of the latest scientific evidence reiterated the view that water fluoridation is a safe and effective method of reducing oral health inequalities.’</p>
<p>^1297382400^3672^Cold water poured on fluoridation a…^A local health authority’s plans for the fluoridation of a city’s tap water was not unlawful, the High Court has ruled.A judge rejected an a…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/tap.png<br />
Dental awards – open for entries^
<p>Entries are now being accepted for the Premier Awards 2011. The Premier Awards were originally created to reward dental professionals who recognise the importance of patient safety within the dental practice, and are open to all dental professionals, both clinical and non-clinical.</p>
<p>
<p>With a total prize fund of £6,000, the Premier Awards offer one of the largest cash prizes for dental risk management projects in the UK. There are now six subject areas available for submissions:<br />• Ethics and professionalism<br />• Record keeping<br />• Cross-infection control<br />• Teamworking and skillmix<br />• Consent and communication,<br />• Health and Safety.</p>
<p>
<p>All members of the dental team are eligible to enter, whatever stage of their career they have reached:<br />• Dental care professionals (undergraduate, postgraduate or practising)<br />• Dental undergraduates <br />• Dentists (postgraduate or practising)</p>
<p>
<p>Dental Protection, the world’s leader in indemnity and risk management support for the dental team has renewed their longstanding partnership with Schülke, the European leader in infection control, to present the Premier Awards for 2011. Once again the event will recognise individual achievements in developing awareness and the effective management of risk within clinical dentistry.</p>
<p>
<p>This year’s Awards will be presented during The Premier Symposium to be held in London during Winter 2011.</p>
<p>
<p>Application forms and leaflets are now available from Dental Protection.</p>
<p>
<p>An application form and full terms and conditions are available by contacting Sarah Garry at Dental Protection on 020 7399 1339 or by emailing sarah.garry@mps.org.uk.</p>
<p>
<p>Further details of the Premier Awards and Premier Symposium are available on the Dental Protection website, <a href=http://www.dentalprotection.org/Awards2011>www.dentalprotection.org/Awards2011</a>.</p>
<p>^1297641600^3678^Dental awards – open for entries^Entries are now being accepted for the Premier Awards 2011. The Premier Awards were originally created to reward dental professionals who re…^<br />
Osteonecrosis studies reveal definition issues^
<p>New research may have a big impact to the developing of better definitions for osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ).</p>
<p>The International and American Associations for Dental Research’s <em>Journal of Dental Research</em> <em>(JDR)</em> has released a research report that estimates the prevalence of ONJ, as well as containing a case-control study on bisphosphonate use and other risk factors.</p>
<p>These investigations represent some of the largest published studies to date on ONJ patients, with the researchers making use of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research-supported practice-based research networks.</p>
<p>The researchers conducted a case-control study to determine the risk associated with bisphosphonates and identified other risk factors for ONJ, including dental diseases and procedures. </p>
<p>Lead author, Andrei Barasch, and colleagues enrolled 191 ONJ cases and 573 controls from 119 dental practices. Bisphosphonate use was strongly associated with ONJ with an odds ratio of 299.5 for intravenous use and 12.2 for oral use. </p>
<p>In a second article, led by Jeffrey Fellows, the researchers identified 572,606 health plan members, of which approximately 25,000 had a diagnosis or procedure code that suggested a necrotic bone lesion, including inflammatory jaw condition, cyst of bone, aseptic necrosis of the bone and open wound of the jaw. </p>
<p>Of those members’ electronic medical records, 73 suspected ONJ cases were identified, of which 16 were later confirmed by manual chart review. </p>
<p>An additional seven cases were indentified through oral surgeons or the Peer Review Committee for a total of 23 confirmed ONJ cases. </p>
<p>Patients with oral bisphosphonates were 15.5 times more likely to have ONJ than non-exposed patients. However, the number of ONJ cases limits firm conclusions and suggests absolute risks for ONJ from oral bisphosphonates is low. </p>
<p>‘ONJ represents a challenging clinical dilemma affecting dental and cancer patients, and communities at many levels of dentistry, notably oral/maxillofacial surgery and oral oncology are called upon to manage these cases,’ said <em>JDR</em> editor-in-chief William Giannobile. ‘The work underscores important clinical implications that will be of value to not only the IADR and AADR communities, but especially practicing clinicians.’</p>
<p>
<p>A perspective article, titled <em>Making a case for defining osteonecrosis of the jaw, s</em>ummarises the key implications of ONJ and the relevance in the field of the two JDR research reports. The research that was conducted may have an important impact to the developing of better definitions for ONJ. </p>
<p>All three of these articles are published in the <em>Journal of Dental Research</em>. Click <a href=http://jdr.sagepub.com/content/early/recent>here</a> to access them.</p>
<p>^1297641600^3674^Osteonecrosis studies reveal defini…^New research may have a big impact to the developing of better definitions for osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ).The International and American…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/human-jaw.jpg<br />
Omega-3 fish oil that doesn’t taste like fish oil? ^
<p>Innovative healthy eating and online supplement specialists HealthyandEssential.com introduce the new ideal omega taste range.</p>
<p>
<p>A fish oil that doesn’t taste of fish oil, and is so delicious that kids beg for more! And with a range of mouth-watering flavours like mango peach, lemon zest (made from fish oil), strawberry banana (made from flax and suitable for vegetarians) and pomegranate blueberry (made from flax, borage and algal oil – and 100% vegan)- a squeeze a day is all you need to get an essential dose of high quality Omega-3.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Many people dislike the taste of fish, or find capsules to difficult to swallow,’ explains HealthyandEssential.com’s founder Ramsay McLellan, ‘so for these people, the answer is Taste!</p>
<p>With the texture of a ‘sauce’, you can mix into smoothies, yoghurt, porridge, or just eat it straight from the spoon. When eaten from the freezer it tastes like sorbet or even a slush puppie! It is a real product innovation, and we hope will see more people getting the Omega-3 they need through Taste.’</p>
<p>
<p>Taste for yourself and purchase at the HealthyandEssential.com for £17.99 for 473ml which lasts ages!</p>
<p>
<p>Ramsay continues: ‘Our business is good health, and we see Taste as a ‘superfood’ which can help people maintain a healthy lifestyle.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Omega-3 is vital for good health – our bodies can’t make it, we have to get it from our food. Mass food processing and modern diets mean that most people lack Omega-3, and need to up their intake.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Ideal Omega Taste is also a great way for vegans and vegetarians to get Omega-3 into their diet.</p>
<p>
<p>However it can never be an answer in itself.’</p>
<p>
<p>Taste is not only available online at <a href=http://www.HealthyandEssential.com>www.HealthyandEssential.com</a> and in a number of health foods outlets  throughout the country.</p>
<p>^1297641600^3675^Omega-3 fish oil that doesn’t tas…^Innovative healthy eating and online supplement specialists HealthyandEssential.com introduce the new ideal omega taste range.A fish oil tha…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/omega3.png<br />
Oral health impacts on kids’ school days^
<p>A child’s ability to learn in school is directly affected by his or her oral health.</p>
<p>
<p>That’s according to dental hygienists in the States who are flagging up the connection this month.</p>
<p>
<p>Building upon the success of the National Dental Hygiene Month message—Brush, Floss, Rinse, and Chew sugar-free gum—the American Dental Hygienists’ Association emphasises the connection between oral health and a child’s ability to learn to mark February’s National Children’s Dental Health Month (NCDHM).<br />                     <br />President,  Caryn Solie, RDH, ADHA, says: ‘Children’s oral health has a direct impact on their ability to learn. If children are in pain from toothaches, they are not able to concentrate and focus on the material in class.</p>
<p>
<p>‘And if they have to continuously miss school due to dental concerns, they are more likely to fall behind. Emphasising the brush, floss, rinse, chew method can help children get into a routine of dental care, because it’s simple and easy to remember.’<br />                     <br />According to the US Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, early tooth loss results in impaired speech development, absence from and inability to concentrate in school, failure to thrive and reduced self-esteem.</p>
<p>
<p>With tooth decay representing the most chronic disease affecting children, stressing proper oral care falls to parents, no matter how defiant a child gets.<br />                     <br />Poor oral health is connected to lower school performance, poor social relationships and less success later in life.</p>
<p>
<p>Children experiencing toothaches are distracted and unlikely to score well on tests.</p>
<p>
<p>However, they’re also often unable to communicate their pain, even if a teacher notices them having difficulties in class. Some of the side effects of pain are anxiety, fatigue, irritability, depression and withdrawal from normal activities.<br />                     <br />Children’s school attendance and performance improve when their dental problems are treated, and they are no longer in pain.</p>
<p>
<p>Teaching and accentuating proper oral care can prevent many of these problems for children in school, and serve them better later in life. <br />                     <br />Putting emphasis on prevention and proper care can save children the pain of toothache, and avoid the consequences poor oral health can have on their learning. But since children can be rebellious about taking care of their teeth, there are ways to coax them into co-operation.<br />                         <br /><strong>Advising parents</strong><br />Parents should plan on helping their children with brushing and flossing for longer. Children don’t have the fine motor skills needed to brush properly until age six, and aren’t able to floss correctly until age 10.<br />• Schedule brushing, flossing and rinsing at times when your child is not tired. <br />• Let your child be involved in the process in an age-appropriate way. This could be as simple as letting him or her pick toothpaste from options you approve. You could even let your children pick their toothbrushes, since there are many coloured and decorated options for kids. <br />• Use positive reinforcement and find out what will motivate your child into brushing and flossing. This may be a sticker or gold stars on a chart, which can also keep them on track.</p>
<p>^1297641600^3676^Oral health impacts on kids’ school…^A child’s ability to learn in school is directly affected by his or her oral health.That’s according to dental hygienists in the States who …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/USgirl.jpg<br />
Poor dental health affects kids’ schoolwork^
<p>A child’s ability to learn in school is directly affected by how healthy their teeth are.</p>
<p>
<p>That’s according to dental experts in the States who are flagging up the connection between the two this month in the country’s National Children’s Dental Health Month (NCDHM).</p>
<p>
<p>Dental hygienists say that children’s oral health has a direct impact on their ability to learn.</p>
<p>
<p>If children are in pain from toothaches, they are not able to concentrate and focus on the material in class.   And if they have to continuously miss school due to dental concerns, they are more likely to fall behind.</p>
<p>
<p>According to the USA’s Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, early tooth loss results in impaired speech development, absence from and inability to concentrate in school, failure to thrive and reduced self-esteem.</p>
<p>
<p>With tooth decay representing the most chronic disease affecting children, stressing proper oral care falls to parents, no matter how defiant a child gets.</p>
<p>
<blockquote>
<p>
<p class=blue_smheadfont><em>Use positive reinforcement and find out what will motivate your child  into brushing and flossing. This may be a sticker or gold stars on a  chart, which can also keep them on track</em></p>
<p></p></blockquote>
<p>
<p>Poor oral health is connected to lower school performance, poor social relationships and less success later in life.</p>
<p>
<p>Children experiencing toothaches are distracted and unlikely to score well on tests.</p>
<p>
<p>However, they’re also often unable to communicate their pain, even if a teacher notices them having difficulties in class. Some of the side effects of pain are anxiety, fatigue, irritability, depression and withdrawal from normal activities.</p>
<p>
<p>Children’s school attendance and performance improve when their dental problems are treated, and they are no longer in pain.</p>
<p>
<p>Teaching and accentuating proper oral care can prevent many of these problems for children in school, and serve them better later in life.</p>
<p>
<p>Putting emphasis on prevention and proper care can save children the pain of toothache, and avoid the consequences poor oral health can have on their learning.</p>
<p>
<p>But since children can be rebellious about taking care of their teeth, there are ways to coax them into co-operation.</p>
<p>
<p><strong class=blue_smheadfont>Top tips</strong></p>
<p>
<p>• Parents should plan on helping their children with brushing and flossing for longer. Children don’t have the fine motor skills needed to brush properly until age six, and aren’t able to floss correctly until age 10<br />• Schedule brushing, flossing and rinsing at times when your child is not tired<br />• Let your child be involved in the process in an age-appropriate way. This could be as simple as letting him or her pick toothpaste from options you approve. You could even let your children pick their toothbrushes, since there are many coloured and decorated options for kids<br />• Use positive reinforcement and find out what will motivate your child into brushing and flossing. This may be a sticker or gold stars on a chart, which can also keep them on track.</p>
<p>^1297641600^3677^Poor dental health affects kids’ sc…^A child’s ability to learn in school is directly affected by how healthy their teeth are.That’s according to dental experts in the States wh…^<br />
New government must prioritise dental health^^1297641600^3679^New government must prioritise dent…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/tick-box-green.jpg<br />
Careers insight for new dentists^
<p>Change was a major theme at a dental careers convention in London earlier this month.</p>
<p>
<p>This year’s ‘Career Opportunities in UK Dentistry’ conference and exhibition was organised by the UCL Eastman Dental Institute and the British Dental Association. <br /> <br />Several hundred newly qualified dentists attended the event to benefit from the knowledge and insight of expert speakers on subjects ranging from clinical leadership and studying abroad to orthodontics and academia. <br /> <br />The morning plenary session at the Hotel Russell was well attended, where delegates heard Lord Howe, parliamentary under-secretary of state at the Department of Health, give his thoughts on the challenges faced by the dental profession today, including the importance of tackling inequalities in health and improving access for children to NHS dentistry.<br /> <br />This was followed by a welcome from Professor Andrew Eder, director of education and CPD at the Eastman, and a lively panel debate featuring Judith Husband, vice chair of the BDA executive board, Barry Cockcroft, chief dental officer for England, Alison Lockyer, chair of the General Dental Council, Professor Stephen Porter, director of the UCL Eastman Dental Institute and Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA Executive Board.<br /> <br />The exhibition area neighbouring the conference halls was also of great interest to attendees who took the opportunity to speak to dental employers and education providers for career guidance.</p>
<p>
<p>The organisers were especially grateful to all the sponsors and, in particular, to Philips Sonicare as the main sponsor.<br /> <br />Now in its 11th year, the UCL Eastman Dental Institute and BDA Careers’ Day provided newly qualified dentists with an inspiring educational programme, highlighting a wide range of challenging opportunities and helping encourage a sense of cohesion among members of the profession.<br /> <br />For more information on next year’s Careers’ Day meeting (which will be held in Central London on Friday 3 February 2012), contact UCL Eastman Dental Institute on 020 7905 1248 (email k.rhatigan@eastman.ucl.ac.uk) or the BDA events team on 020 7563 4590 (email events@bda.org).</p>
<p>^1297641600^3680^Careers insight for new dentists^Change was a major theme at a dental careers convention in London earlier this month.This year’s ‘Career Opportunities in UK Den…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/carreerslineup.jpg<br />
Scrubwear range key to new collection ^
<p>In response to the increased demand for scrubwear, Grahame Gardner has introudced a new unisex scrub tunic within their latest brochure.</p>
<p>
<p>The SS3295 complements Grahame Gardner’s existing extensive scrubwear range, but also boasts several design features which make it stand out from more standard scrub tunics. </p>
<p>The stylish SS3295 has a v-style neck, complemented by the v-detail on the sleeves, and contrasting trim available on the neck, sleeve and pocket.</p>
<p>
<p>Stocked in navy, blue 18 and bottle green, this tunic is sure to be a hit with dental professionals who prefer a more relaxed approach to uniforms. </p>
<p>Simon Ward, sales director for Grahame Gardner, says: ‘The rise in the popularity of scrubwear over the past couple of years has been phenomenal.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Influenced by American healthcare styles and a desire for a more relaxed working wardrobe, scrubwear has become an acceptable form of workwear for all healthcare staff, not just those within the operating theatre.</p>
<p>
<p>‘With our experienced design team and our specific knowledge of the practicalities of healthcare uniforms we have been able to respond quickly to this current trend, now offering one of the most comprehensive ranges on the market.’</p>
<p>Grahame Gardner offer three distinct scrubwear ranges:</p>
<p>
<p>•GG* Scrubs, a classic unisex range</p>
<p>
<p>• Urbane Scrubs, developed specifically for women</p>
<p>
<p>• Easiephit, a unisex range with a bold colour palette.</p>
<p>To explore Grahame Gardner’s collection, go to <a href=http://www.grahamegardner.co.uk>www.grahamegardner.co.uk</a>, or call 0116 255 6326 to order a copy of their new brochure.</p>
<p>^1297641600^3681^Scrubwear range key to new collecti…^In response to the increased demand for scrubwear, Grahame Gardner has introudced a new unisex scrub tunic within their latest brochure.The …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/lily.jpg<br />
Dental writer needed^
<p>A busy leading UK healthcare PR and media agency is looking for a new writer.</p>
<p>
<p>The company’s success is a testament to the high quality of editorial material it provides.</p>
<p>
<p>The small company has room for growth and offers long-term opportunities for the right candidate.</p>
<p>
<p>It is looking for someone:<br />• With excellent writing skills, who is happy to produce business-to-business press releases, articles and not be intimidated by re-writes/abstracts of clinical papers<br />• With a good strong telephone manner, confident to call clients/customers for testimonials and interview for technical articles<br />• Who is articulate and methodical proofreading skills<br />• Who is highly organised attitude<br />• Who is a positive thinker and happy to work in a small team<br />• Who can take instructions and adapt to clients change of focus<br />• Is happy to attend business meetings and exhibitions</p>
<p>
<p>Based in East Kent, the company is looking for someone with at least two years’ work experience. A level English Language a plus.</p>
<p>
<p>Please send a CV to dentalwriters@gmail.com.</p>
<p>^1297728000^3685^Dental writer needed^A busy leading UK healthcare PR and media agency is looking for a new writer.The company’s success is a testament to the high quality of edi…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/writer.jpg<br />
Open floodgates on fluoridation, says expert^
<p>The British Dental Health Foundation welcomed the High Court’s decision to rule the plans to fluoridate Southampton’s water supply was not illegal and urged more to follow suit after claims the local primary care trust acted unlawfully was rejected.</p>
<p>
<p>At a judicial review, Mr Justice Holman dismissed the legal challenge against the process, rejecting claims by resident Geraldine Milner that the decision-making process was ‘defective’.</p>
<p>
<p>The proposal by Southampton City Primary Care Trust to increase the level of fluoride in water to one part per million, was given the go-ahead in February 2009 after research showed the move would significantly improve dental health.</p>
<p>
<p>Chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter, welcomes the decision and hopes it will lead to more of the country’s health authorities following suit.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Carter says: ‘The verdict will be of a great benefit to an area where tooth decay amongst under-fives has been a problem. Though there has been opposition, robust scientific research supports the fact that fluoride significantly improves oral health and there is no evidence to suggest that it can have any negative impact on overall health.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Fluoride was added to the Birmingham supply in 1964 and the difference in dental health compared to the neighbouring population in non-fluoridated Sandwell was stark. When Sandwell’s water was fluoridated in 1987 it transformed levels of oral health, putting a poor borough amongst the top 10 areas for dental health in the country.’</p>
<p>
<p>Although water fluoridation schemes have been in place in the UK for more than 40 years, only around five-and-a-half million people have been drinking water from a fluoridated area.</p>
<p>
<p>The scheme, which has been on hold for 14 months, was legally challenged by local resident, Geraldine Milner.</p>
<p>
<p>The South Central Strategic Health Authority (SHA) reportedly set aside £400,000 for the proceedings consistently argued they met or exceeded all their legal requirements.</p>
<p>
<p>The SHA said that it was happy to go ahead with the plan to fluoridate the water supply, as research from the Scientific Committee on Health and Environmental Risks has proven that adding fluoride to water is safe, as well as being an effective means of improving oral health.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Carter adds: ‘Fluoridation is the most important single measure that the UK government can take to bring a substantial change in the nation’s dental health. The Foundation is calling for Government to facilitate the rapid introduction of fluoride into the nation’s water supplies, particularly in areas of social and economic deprivation.’</p>
<p>^1297728000^3682^Open floodgates on fluoridation, sa…^The British Dental Health Foundation welcomed the High Court’s decision to rule the plans to fluoridate Southampton’s water supp…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/water-glass.jpg<br />
A most important, single measure^
<p>The verdict at the High Court to rule that the plans to fluoridate Southampton’s water supply was not illegal will be of a great benefit to an area where tooth decay amongst under-fives has been a problem.</p>
<p>
<p>Though there has been opposition, robust scientific research supports the fact that fluoride significantly improves oral health and there is no evidence to suggest that it can have any negative impact on overall health.</p>
<p>Fluoride was added to the Birmingham supply in 1964 and the difference in dental health compared to the neighbouring population in non-fluoridated Sandwell was stark.</p>
<p>
<p>When Sandwell’s water was fluoridated in 1987 it transformed levels of oral health, putting a poor borough amongst the top 10 areas for dental health in the country.</p>
<p>Although water fluoridation schemes have been in place in the UK for more than 40 years, only around five-and-a-half million people have been drinking water from a fluoridated area.</p>
<p>Fluoridation is the most important single measure that the UK government can take to bring a substantial change in the nation’s dental health.</p>
<p>
<p>The British Dental Health Foundation now calls for the government to facilitate the rapid introduction of fluoride into the nation’s water supplies, particularly in areas of social and economic deprivation.</p>
<p>^1297728000^3683^A most important, single measure^The verdict at the High Court to rule that the plans to fluoridate Southampton’s water supply was not illegal will be of a great benefit to …^<br />
Beauty, Botox and reinvention^
<p>Tracey Bell has launched their new online shop (<a href=http://www.traceybell.co.uk>www.traceybell.co.uk</a>) integrating both their extensive range of products and a host of Dental and Cosmetic treatments.</p>
<p>No longer can you only simply buy the latest anti-ageing lotion, potion or hot new beauty product online, but now you can buy your teeth whitening treatments, anti-wrinkle injections, laser treatments or even your medical consultations online.</p>
<p><a href=http://www.traceybell.co.uk>www.traceybell.co.uk</a> was launched in conjunction with the Tracey Bell Facebook page and the 12 days of Christmas – a limited Christmas sale offering treatments and products at exclusive prices.</p>
<p>
<p>The site is based on Vendas POWA platform and was supported through the Isle of Man Department of Economic Developments Retailer Internet Scheme.</p>
<p>Tracey Bell says: ‘The launch was amazing and we enjoyed a 400% rise in sales within the first week. It was quite simple really. </p>
<p>
<p>‘The price was correct, the treatments and products are what people really want and we could market to a select group of Facebook fans. Plus, the excellent support of the Department of Economic Development really helped us on our way.</p>
<p>‘Virtual buying is certainly the future and our offering now encompasses securing appointments, researching treatments and booking at the patients convenience – all from the comfort of your own home!’</p>
<hr />
<p>Tracey Bell was founded in 2008. The company offers a host of products  and treatments from Dentistry to Non-Surgical, Laser, Slimming and  Cosmetic surgery products.</p>
<p> Their brands include:<br /> • SlimScription More than just weight loss.<br /> • SmileScription General and Designer Dental.<br /> • SpaScription Age perfecting mineral makeup.<br /> • SkinScription Non-Surgical solutions and Medicated skin.</p>
<p>^1297728000^3684^Beauty, Botox and reinvention^Tracey Bell has launched their new online shop (www.traceybell.co.uk) integrating both their extensive range of products and a host of Denta…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/tbell.jpg<br />
Taking drilling out of dentistry^
<p> </p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<p>According to the World Oral Health Report 2003, dental caries remains a major public health problem in most industrialised countries, affecting 60–90% of schoolchildren and the vast majority of adults.</p>
<p>
<p>In the United States, dental caries is the most common chronic childhood disease, being at least five times more common than asthma.</p>
<p>
<p>With more than 55% of the total American population experiencing some form of caries that is a staggering 151 Million people suffering from decay.  </p>
<p>Dental caries, also known as tooth decay, is a disease in which bacterial processes damage hard tooth structure including enamel and dentine.</p>
<p>
<p>These tissues progressively break down, producing dental caries (cavities, holes in the teeth) and if left untreated, the disease can lead to pain, tooth loss, infection and, in severe cases, death. Today, caries remains one of the most common diseases throughout the world. </p>
<p>The presentation of caries is highly variable; however, the risk factors and stages of development are similar.</p>
<p>
<p>Initially, it may appear as a small chalky area that may eventually develop into a large hole. Sometimes caries may be directly visible, however other methods of detection, such as X-rays, are used for less visible areas of teeth and to judge the extent of the damage.</p>
<p>Tooth decay is caused by specific types of acid-producing bacteria that cause damage in the presence of fermentable carbohydrates such as sugar. The mineral content of teeth is sensitive to increases in acidity.</p>
<p>
<p>Specifically, a tooth, which is mainly mineral in content, is in a constant state of back-and-forth demineralisation and remineralisation between the tooth and the surrounding saliva.</p>
<p>
<p>When the pH at the surface of the tooth drops below 5.5, demineralisation proceeds faster than remineralisation, resulting in decay.</p>
<p>
<p>Depending on the extent of tooth destruction, various treatments can be used to restore the teeth to their proper shape, function, and appearance. This treatment traditionally takes the form of fillings, crowns and bridges, involving the use of local anaesthetic injections and drills.</p>
<p>
<p>Unfortunately, often, during these procedures quite a large amount of otherwise healthy tooth material is removed. This tooth mat</p>
<p>
<p>erial can never be replaced. </p>
<p>Fortunately there is now a new treatment which means that, in many situations, the Dentist can repair teeth that have become discoloured or developed porosities as a result of decay without the need for either the local an aesthetic injection or any drilling. This is a tremendous benefit.</p>
<p>
<p><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Icon.jpg alt=

Developed by a German dental company, and now available in the UK, Icon is a liquid plastic which can be applied to the damaged part of the tooth in order to create a repair.

First the affected tooth is cleaned using a special gel, which is simply washed off after a few minutes. The tooth is dried with a puff of air; then the liquid plastic is applied and set hard using a simple hand-held light. There is no need for either an injection or a drill. Simple, quick and easy, it is painless and enables the dentist to repair slightly damaged teeth and minor blemishes without the need for drilling.
 
For further information, ask your dentist about Icon or visit www.drilling-no-thanks.co.uk

^1297814400^3686^Taking drilling out of dentistry^   According to the World Oral Health Report 2003, dental caries remains a major public health problem in most industrialised…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/icon2-copy.jpg
Do practice meeting sandwiches lack filling?^

Some 80% of employees think the quality of sandwiches at their business meetings has fallen, according to a recent survey.

Only 4% questioned felt that the quality of sandwiches had improved over the last five years, with 16% noticing no change.

The average cost of sandwiches per person at meetings currently stands at £3.80.

When the survey was first conducted in 2006, the average cost was just under £6 per person.

Popular sandwiches back in 2006 included ‘crayfish and avocado’ and ‘chicken teriyaki’ – but today ‘cheese and pickle’ and ‘tuna and sweetcorn’ featured much more heavily in the survey.

Maris Interiors conducted the survey. Its chairman, Michael Howard, says: ‘It’s a sign of these austere times that companies are spending much less on sandwiches in the boardroom.

‘It’s certainly a sensible way to cut costs, but be careful not to overdo it: you won’t impress a client with jam sandwiches!’

185 people participated in the survey, conducted between 7-11 February 2011.

Average cost of sandwiches at business meetings per person:

• 2006 – £5.91
• 2008 – £4.68
• 2009 – £4.22
• 2011 – £3.80

• Maris Interiors LLP is the UK’s leading specialist in workplace design and creation.

^1297814400^3687^Do practice meeting sandwiches lack…^Some 80% of employees think the quality of sandwiches at their business meetings has fallen, according to a recent survey.Only 4% questioned…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/sandwich.jpg
Young dentists enjoy ‘sell-out’ conference^

More than 300 young dentists attended the Young Dentist Conference in London last month, where the expert panel of speakers included Naveen Karir, Specialist Registrar in Restorative Dentistry and Tim Newton, Professor of Psychology as Applied to Dentistry.

Naveen Karir opened the sixth annual conference by discussing the health implications and management of periodontology in primary care. Naveen explored the wider issues of periodontal care, and discussed findings from the latest research and their links with the patient’s general health.

In an increasingly difficult financial climate, many young dentists are feeling the strain of monetary worries and job security which could have an impact on their personal health.

Ros Edlin, an expert in stress management discussed how to recognise stress, and explored strategies for managing stress in the individual and the wider dental team.

Tim Newton, further expanded on Ros’ lecture and provided the young dentists with strategies for managing stressed patients and suggested behavioural (rather than sedation) techniques to ensure that the patient and clinician remain calm and collected.

In the final session of the day, Claire Storey, James Field and Dev Patel discussed the pitfalls that can arise in the fields of crown and bridgework, oral surgery and removable prosthodontics. The three speakers, all of whom accept referrals from GDPs, discussed the particular problems that can arise when communicating with the patient, laboratory and the referring dentist and suggested methods for avoiding them.

The Young Dentist Conference 2011 was the sixth outing of this annual event organised by Dental Protection, the BDA and BDJ. The organisers also wish to thank the sponsors Schülke for their continued support.

More information about the Young Dentist Conference, can be found at www.dentalprotection.org/ydc.

^1297814400^3688^Young dentists enjoy ‘sell-out’…^More than 300 young dentists attended the Young Dentist Conference in London last month, where the expert panel of speakers included Naveen …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/newton.jpg
Beam – just for your dental patients^

Beam is a new website for patients created by leading dental publishers of Dentistry magazine and this site, www.dentistry.co.uk.

Having discovered a niche in the marketplace for a fun, but informative, online source for your patients, we have produced www.beamdental.co.uk.

Patients visiting Beam can learn about dental treatments – from implants to tooth whitening, orthodontics to smile makeovers, oral health issues to the latest toothbrush technology, mouthwashes and toothpastes.

There is also a page to discuss dental problems with other patients and they can seek expert advice from our panel of dentists and hygienist.

There’s a celebrity news section to keep visitors entertained and up to date on the latest treatment choice of the stars, plus before and after case studies and real-life experiences of happy patients.

We can help patients find you, too. Our quick ‘Find a dentist’ button navigates them right to your door via an easy-to-enter postcode facility – and you can upload images and treatment details to the page featuring your practice.

Key features:
• Dental, aesthetics and beauty news
• Educational, non-biased, information
• Celebrity stories
• Ask an expert
• Competitions/giveaways/vouchers
• Discussion forum
• Patient testimonials and case studies
• Find a dentist.

^1297814400^3689^Beam – just for your dental patie…^Beam is a new website for patients created by leading dental publishers of Dentistry magazine and this site, www.dentistry.co.uk.Having disc…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/beampage.jpg
Fab beauty cheats and tips for a celebrity face^

Want the skin of a celebrity but haven’t the money to afford it?

Whatever your budget, Talent Management has some fab cheats and tips that will ensure you always look fantastic!

Here, some face masks for you to try at home.

Many facials are designed to exfoliate, moisturise, refresh or nourish your skin and there are some great fun ways that you can do this in the comfort of your own bathroom with very little expense.

To make the most of the experience ask a friend to join in and you can have a blast mixing up beautifying potions to test on each other!

All of the masks below should be used while fresh and applied and left on the face for 10-15 minutes.

Talent Management advises that you test a small dab of any ingredients that you intend to use, behind the ear, 48 hours prior to application, in case you are particularly sensitive.

Exfoliating mask
For an exfoliating mask suitable for all skin types:
Mix two tablespoons of natural yogurt with a tablespoon of oatmeal.

Moisturising mask
For a dry skin moisturising mask:
Mash the flesh of an avocado and add a teaspoon of olive oil.

Refreshing mask
For an oily skin refreshing mask:
Whisk an egg white and mix in four crushed strawberries.

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<p>
<p><span class=blue_smheadfont>Mattifying mask</span><br />For a simple mask that will absorb oil from the skin without leaving it too dry:<br />Plain milk of magnesia.</p>
<p>
<p><span class=blue_smheadfont>Nourishing mask</span><br /> For a nourishing mask suitable for all skin types:<br />Simply use honey.</p>
<p>
<p>For some fantastic beauty and make-up tips check out this informative Models Direct article by simply clicking <a href=http://www.prlog.org/10608561-models-direct-makeup-and-beauty-tips-and-secrets.html>here.<br /></a></p>
<p>^1297814400^3690^Fab beauty cheats and tips for a ce…^Want the skin of a celebrity but haven’t the money to afford it?Whatever your budget, Talent Management has some fab cheats and tips that wi…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/avocado1.jpg<br />
‘Snake venom’ promises needle-free cosmetic surgery^
<p>A new skincare line has been launched that contains a snake venom-like ingredient designed to renew the look of your skin.</p>
<p>
<p>Balance Active Formula has the cutting-edge ingredient Syn-ake, a snake venom-like peptide that works in the same way as Botox but is pain-free – and needle free!</p>
<p>
<p>It has targeted products for beautiful, radiant, younger-looking skin.</p>
<p>
<p>Available at an affordable price of only £29.99 for a five-piece set, meaning that smooth, youthful looking skin is no longer only for those who can afford costly treatments and products. </p>
<p>Parabens free, dermatologically tested and suitable for sensitive skin, Balance Active Formula will give you more radiant-looking skin.</p>
<p>
<p><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/balance.jpg alt=

The Balance Active Formula Luxury Skincare Set includes…

WRINKLE-FREEZE SERUM 30ml with SYN-AKE
This light, non-greasy serum is designed to reduce the look of wrinkles. Ideal for use on the forehead, crow’s feet, jowls and all-over, this hero product can be used day and night under makeup. In a self assessment, women aged 35-44 after four weeks:
• 70% of women noticed a REDUCTION IN THE APPEARANCE OF FOREHEAD WRINKLES
• 72 % of women thought that EXPRESSION LINES APPEARED SMOOTHER/PLUMPED OUT
+ Self-assessment of 56 women conducted over 4 weeks (September-October 2010).

INSTANT EFFECT WRINKLE FILLER 50ml with LIFTENSYL
Designed to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. This powerful filler smoothes the look of fine lines and wrinkles, leaving behind a more rested and radiant appearance. Containing Liftensyl; a soy protein, as well as Gransil DMCM-5.
In a self-assessment, women 35-50 years, after one application:
• 84% of women thought their SKIN FELT SMOOTHER
• 76% of women thought their SKIN FELT SOFTER
• 54 % of women thought their felt SKIN LOOKED MORE RADIANT
+ Self-assessment of 19 women conducted 2 hrs after one application (March 2007). 

DAY CREAM 50ml with UVA/UVB and ALGISIUM C2
A fresh formula ideal for everyday use, this anti-ageing cream hydrates the skin leaving it looking radiant, rehydrated and smoothed. Packed full of potent ingredients including Algisium C2; a unique multi-functional ingredient which has been designed to reduce the look wrinkles and fine lines and to boost skin’s radiance and hydration. Formulated with Vitamin E, a natural anti-oxidant. 

NIGHT CREAM 50ml with ALGISIUM C2 and RETINOL
This night cream maximises those eight precious hours of nightly beauty sleep and helps revitalising your looks by smoothing the appearance of visible lines and wrinkles. Wake up to a healthy looking you!

ULTIMATE YOUTH EYE CREAM 20ml with EYEPRO 3X
A targeted eye cream formulated to address all the concerns of ageing eyes, this light cream hydrates the delicate skin around the eye area, improving the appearance of dark circles, bags and fine lines safely. Contains EyePro 3X and Easyliance.
In a self-assessment, women 28-64 years, after one application:
• 64% of women thought there was an IMPROVEMENT IN APPEARANCE OF DARK CIRCLES
• 58% of women thought that there was a REDUCED SAGGINESS OF SKIN IN EYE AREA
• 83 % of women thought there was an IMPROVEMENT IN SKIN MOISTURISATION
+ Self-assessment of 17 women conducted over 4 weeks (April/May 2006).

Available from www.balancecosmetics.co.uk.

^1297814400^3692^’Snake venom’ promises needle-free …^A new skincare line has been launched that contains a snake venom-like ingredient designed to renew the look of your skin.Balance Active For…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/snakeskin.jpg
Spring into CPD at ‘stellar seminar’^

Following 2010’s sell out seminar, CPD Essentials is back, once again offering dentists and DCPs a whole year’s core verifiable CPD in one day!

Spring is just around the corner and the chance to gain a whole year’s verifiable CPD is being snapped up fast.

Make sure you join Yusof Omar, Martin Fulford, Jimmy Makdissi & Len D’Cruz on 1 April for what’s set to be a stellar seminar.

Yusof Omar, Martin Fulford and Jimmy Makdissi will explore Medical Emergencies, Disinfection & Decontamination and Radiography and Radiation Protection respectively.

Following this, Len D’Cruz will offer his expertise on the remaining two core subjects: Legal & Ethical Issues and Handling Complaints.

This one-day seminar is the perfect opportunity to get your core CPD for the year. Bring the whole team and update your skills whilst leaning from the experts!

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<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<p>One-day seminar prices:<br />Dentist: £355+vat<br />*Subscriber dentist: £319.50+vat<br />DCP/Team member: £175+vat<br />*Subscriber DCP/ream member: £157.50+vat<br />Special team rate (1 dentist + 2 DCPs/team members): £555+vat</p>
<p>*10% discount for subscribers to <em>Private Dentistry</em>, <em>Aesthetic Dentistry Today</em>, <em>Implant Dentistry Today</em>, <em>Endodontic Practice</em>, <em>Private Laboratory</em> and <em>Preventive Dentistry</em>. </p>
<p>Places are selling fast for this popular event so book your place now.</p>
<p>
<p>Visit <a href=http://www.independentseminars.com>www.independentseminars.com</a> or call 0800 371652 today.</p>
<p>^1297814400^3691^Spring into CPD at ‘stellar seminar…^Following 2010’s sell out seminar, CPD Essentials is back, once again offering dentists and DCPs a whole year’s core verifiable CPD in one d…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/2009-sunset.png<br />
Dental hygienist scoops prize ^
<p>A Solihull dental hygienist has scooped a prize in recognition of more than 20 years of excellent service to the dental profession.</p>
<p>
<p>Sharon Tozer won the James Hull company award for Best Performing Hygienist/Therapist of the year 2010/2011.</p>
<p>
<p>As a member of – and hygienist representative for – the clinical advisory board, Sharon has provided consistently excellent service to the dental profession for more than 20 years.</p>
<p>
<p>She qualified as a dental hygienist from Birmingham Dental Hospital in 1989 and works at Manor Care Dental in Solihull as well as in GDP, maxillofacial and oral surgery and orthodontics at Solihull Hospital.</p>
<p>
<p>Sharon has obtained her teaching certificate and is an honorary clinical lecturer working with undergraduate hygiene and therapy students at Solihull Hospital, where she is also a core trainer in basic life support.</p>
<p>
<p>With such a range of skills and qualifications, it is obvious that Sharon is a devoted and hardworking member of the dental profession, and James Hull Associates are proud to have been able to recognise her considerable achievements and ongoing dedication to dentistry.</p>
<p>
<p>James Hull Associates is committed to recognising the dedication of their staff and to rewarding performance beyond the call of duty.</p>
<p>
<p>As such, the James Hull Associates (JHA) Company Awards were created to identify and reward individuals and practices for their consistently outstanding work.</p>
<p>
<p>For more information contact 02920 772 930 or visit <a href=http://www.jameshull.co.uk>www.jameshull.co.uk</a>.</p>
<p>^1297900800^3693^Dental hygienist scoops prize ^A Solihull dental hygienist has scooped a prize in recognition of more than 20 years of excellent service to the dental profession.Sharon To…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/jameshullhygiene.jpg<br />
Pensions – the last thing on your mind?^
<p>Compulsory Pension Contributions (CPC) may be the last thing on dentists’ minds as they try to cope with the recent VAT rise, as well as contend with matters like CQC registration.</p>
<p>
<p>However, given the government’s decision to reintroduce 2012 as the start date for the roll-out of this change in employment legislation, it is important that all dental practices take the time to get to grips with the implications this could have for their business, as pensions is an area that looks set to impact heavily on all employers.<br /> <br />In a nutshell, beginning in 2012 with large corporations (120,000 employees or more) all employees who do not yet have access to a company pension scheme will be automatically enrolled into and required to contribute to some form of pension arrangement unless they formally ‘opt out’ in writing.</p>
<p>
<p>Naturally, employers will also be expected to match employee contributions, adding further to staff costs and overall business overheads.<br /> <br />Despite the bad news regarding the reversion from 2017 to 2012 as the starting date for CPC – a decision made largely in view of the looming pensions crisis caused by people’s longer life expectancy – the good news is that many dental practices will have a little longer than most to sort out where the extra money will come from.</p>
<p>
<p>Because most dental practices are classed as being ‘small business’, having 50 employees or fewer, they will be exempt from the scheme until August 2014.<br /> <br />Further good news is that initially, the amount payable by employers will only be a certain percentage of employee earnings between £5,715 and £38,185, rather than on their full salary.</p>
<p>
<p>In addition to this, company contributions will be phased in gradually in stages, so that during the enrolment period (October 2012 to September 2016) employers will only pay a 1% contribution.</p>
<p>
<p>This will rise to 2% in October 2016 and finally 3% in October 2017.<br /> <br />So, what sort of figures are we talking about then?</p>
<p>
<p>It is likely that dentists will be looking at paying out an annual pension contribution of anything between £279 (for an employee on £15,000 or less) to £974 (for an employee earning in excess of £40,000). <br /> <br />Despite the gradual introduction of these payments, one thing is certain: unless the government has a change of heart, all GDPs will need to have a found a way to tighten their belts by 2014.</p>
<p>
<p>Fortunately, with another three years to go before then, wise practice principals will start looking at ways to cushion the blow.<br /> <br />For more information please visit <a href=http://www.lansdellrose.co.uk>www.lansdellrose.co.uk</a> or call Lansdell & Rose on 020 7376 9333.</p>
<p>^1297900800^3694^Pensions – the last thing on your…^Compulsory Pension Contributions (CPC) may be the last thing on dentists’ minds as they try to cope with the recent VAT rise, as well …^<br />
Dental book profits go to charity^
<p>Why is it that when it comes to new opportunities, it’s always the same dentists who get to them first? There has never been a better time to be in dentistry, but what does the future hold?<br /> <br />These questions and more are answered in: Brush: Proven strategies to make you and your dental business shine.<br /> <br />Successful dentist and thought leader James Goolnik shares with you his blueprint to creating both a successful life and a successful dental practice.</p>
<p>
<p><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/gool.jpg alt=

And James chose Dentaid to receive all the profits of his book.

The first project they plan to assist is a dental programme for rural poor in Cambodia.

Andy Jong, of Dentaid, says: ‘James’s generous support from his book will mean our Cambodian partner can launch their oral health education programme into more schools and offer significantly better quality community oral health care from the surgeries they will now receive.
 
Business coach, Chris Barrow, adds: ‘This book is relevant, authentic and overflowing with practical wisdom/great ideas – it shows how any dentist with passion, knowledge, skill and the right attitude can follow James to the summit of personal and professional achievement. Read it – there is always room at the top.’
 
The book launches on 11 March and we will be offering 10 lucky readers a FREE copy in a competition next month.

^1297900800^3695^Dental book profits go to charity^Why is it that when it comes to new opportunities, it’s always the same dentists who get to them first? There has never been a better …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/brushcover.jpg
Save your pennies for dentist trips^

The recession is hitting the pockets of everyone – but dentists are urging people not to neglect their teeth.

Concerns about the economic climate are leading patients in England to cancel dental appointments and defer treatments they need, according to dentists.

Experts at the British Dental Association (BDA) report that the unfortunate knock-on effect of these decisions is an increase in the number of patients presenting at surgeries requiring emergency treatment.

‘Visiting the dentist at appropriate intervals will ensure you
get the help you need to maintain good oral health’

A survey carried out by the BDA found that 59% of dentists questioned had seen their patients cancel appointments, while 68% reported decisions to defer treatment.

Unsurprisingly, given these trends, more than a third of practitioners said they had seen an increased demand for emergency treatment during the past twelve months.
 
Dr Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA’s executive board, said: ‘It’s understandable that, at a time when there is widespread concern about household finances, some patients’ financial anxieties are leading them to defer dental appointments and treatment.

‘Achieving short-term money savings at the expense of longer-term health problems really isn’t wise though. Neglecting your oral health can increase both the complexity of the problems you face and the cost of the treatment you must eventually have. Visiting the dentist at appropriate intervals will ensure that you get the help you need to maintain good oral health.’


The British Dental Association (BDA) is the professional association for dentists in the UK.

 

^1297900800^3696^Save your pennies for dentist trips^The recession is hitting the pockets of everyone – but dentists are urging people not to neglect their teeth.Concerns about the econom…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/pink-pig.jpg
Research shows rise in smoking^^1297900800^3697^Research shows rise in smoking^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/cigarette-and-smoke.jpg
Growth expected in dental implant sector^^1297900800^3701^Growth expected in dental implant s…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/implants.jpg
Long or short sleeves – ‘same number of bugs’ ^

A new study suggests that, where bacteria are concerned, there is no difference in the risks of contamination between doctors wearing long sleeves and those wearing and short sleeves in practice.

Researchers from the University of Colorado assessed the accurateness of the statement that longer sleeves lead to more contamination. 
 
Here in the UK, guidelines advise against physicians wearing long-sleeved white coats in the belief that it decreases the transmission of bacteria. 
 
Within the dental arena, the cross-infection advice within HTM 01-05: Decontamination in Dental Practice in which the Department of Health offers guidance on decontamination in primary care dental practices, states: ‘Short sleeves allow the forearms to be washed as part of the hand hygiene routine.
 
‘Dental staff need to be aware of the hazards that may be encountered in the decontamination process and may wish to wear long-cuffed gloves or disposal long-sleeved gowns to protect their arms.’

But this latest study challenges the current thinking.
 
The Colorado group tested the uniforms of 100 physicians at Denver Health randomly assigned to wearing a newly washed, short-sleeved uniform or their standard long-sleeved white coat.

A sample of 50 physicians were asked to start the day of the trial in a standard, freshly washed, short-sleeved uniform, and the 50 physicians wearing their usual long-sleeved white coats were not made aware of the trial date until shortly before the cultures were obtained, to ensure that they did not change or wash their coats. 
 
Cultures were taken from the physicians’ wrists, cuffs and pockets – and no significant differences were found in bacteria colony counts between each style.

Lead researcher, Marisha Burden, says: ‘We were surprised to find no statistical difference in contamination between the short- and long-sleeved workwear. We also found bacterial contamination of newly laundered uniforms occurs within hours of putting them on.’

The researchers discovered that, despite the freshly laundered uniforms being virtually sterile prior to being worn, nearly 50% of the bacteria counted at eight hours were already present after only three hours of wear.

Marisha Burden adds: ‘By the end of an eight-hour work day, we found no data supporting the contention that long-sleeved white coats were more heavily contaminated than short-sleeved uniforms.  Our data do not support discarding white coats for uniforms that are changed on a daily basis, or for requiring healthcare workers to avoid long-sleeved garments.’

^1297900800^3698^Long or short sleeves – ‘same n…^A new study suggests that, where bacteria are concerned, there is no difference in the risks of contamination between doctors wearing long s…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/dentistsarm.jpg
A generation of smiles^

Caring for your teeth is a lifelong job and the importance of good dental care should never be underestimated.

Here, Denplan’s chief dental officer, Roger Matthews, serves up his top tips in taking care of teeth throughout their development.

1. No pause when pregnant
Pregnant mothers should practice good dental care, even before their baby is born as evidence suggests that bacteria present in their mouths can determine if their child will be prone to decay.

2. Baby, you’re looking good   
Babies’ dental care is really important, even before the first tooth comes in, so parents should schedule in a dentist appointment before their child’s first birthday and every six months afterwards.

3. It’s child’s play
Children should be supervised when brushing their teeth until at least seven years of age. Be sure to invest in a good toothbrush and brush with a fluoride toothpaste.

4. Inbetweeners 
Once teeth start to touch together, flossing should be introduced as part of a daily routine. It’s a skill your dentist or hygienist should be able to help you with.

5. Teen rebels
Teenagers are often conscious about how they look, but some trends such as lip and tongue piercings can chip and fracture teeth as well as increasing the risk of infection.

6. Growing in wisdom
If wisdom teeth start to cause soreness, you can try bathing them in comfortably hot water with a teaspoon of salt. It’s also a good idea to see your dentist more regularly during this time, to make sure you’re not experiencing anything unusual.

7. Snack attacks
Avoid snacking between meals – all foods have hidden sugars which put teeth under constant attack and can then cause decay.

8. Cosmetic solutions
Adults can expect a little darkening of the teeth as they get older, so cosmetic improvements such as whitening could be a good option.

9. Don’t let things slip
In later life, denture wearers can use products such as Fixodent to help increase the comfort and confident feeling that dentures won’t slip.

10. All powered up
Some people find that arthritis, for example, makes brushing more difficult, so power brushes can be very important here. It’s a good idea to speak with your dentist for advice.

 

^1297900800^3699^A generation of smiles^Caring for your teeth is a lifelong job and the importance of good dental care should never be underestimated.Here, Denplan’s chief de…^
Polar bear gets grizzly over rotten tooth ^

A polar bear in a Scottish zoo underwent a major op to have his tooth pulled out.

Staff at the Highland Wildlife Park at Kingussie noticed their two-year-old polar bear, Walker, had a swollen jaw and investigated further.

Walker weighs 38 stone and was treated by whole team of vets.

When antibiotics failed to cure the decaying tooth, medics realised he would need dental surgery.

So, a team of four vets put Walker to sleep with anaesthetic, lifted him on to a table built of hay bales to support his massive bulk and removed the infected tooth that caused the swelling.

 /></p>
<p>
<p>A spokeswoman for the zoo confirmed that Walker – who was brought to Scotland from a zoo in Holland in November – made a quick recovery.</p>
<p>She said: ‘He had a slight swelling on the side of his face’ but the op went smoothly.</p>
<p>His teeth were X-rayed and they considered root canal, but further investigation revealed he would have to have to culprit extracted.</p>
<p>
<p>Vets believe Walker may have broken the tip off a tooth which led to an infection.</p>
<p>Walker shares an enclosure with 28-year-old female, Mercedes. His attempts to play with her were initially met with a cold shoulder but their relationship is said to have improved in recent weeks.</p>
<p>
<p><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/bear-2.jpg alt=

^1297900800^3700^Polar bear gets grizzly over rotten…^A polar bear in a Scottish zoo underwent a major op to have his tooth pulled out.Staff at the Highland Wildlife Park at Kingussie noticed th…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/bear-full.jpg
Bat map begins^

In a clever use of GPS technology, biologists have ‘mapped’ the topography of bat teeth as if they were uncharted mountain ranges.

Scientists at a university in Massachusetts in the US wanted to understand how toothy ridges, peaks and valleys have evolved to allow different species to eat everything from hard-shelled insects to blood and nectar.


Like any specialised tool, teeth are designed to match the task, in this case breaking down food. Tooth shapes are very specialised to meet specific functions.

Different species of bats eat different types of food and this is reflected in their teeth.

For example, the fruit-eating species had teeth with sharp outer edges to pierce the fruit and large surfaces with tiny indentations to help grind the pulp.

The research is a major step forward in understanding the feeding systems of mammals.

^1297900800^3702^Bat map begins^In a clever use of GPS technology, biologists have ‘mapped’ the topography of bat teeth as if they were uncharted mountain range…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/bat.jpg
Bat map begins^^1297900800^3703^Bat map begins^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Bat-skull-and-canines-photo.jpg
Students celebrate clinician awards success^

The 34th annual Student Clinician Programme Awards celebrated the hard work of the dental students involved and the valuable contribution they made to the future of their profession.

First place went to Deema Marzouq for her presentation on ethical issues with the use of animal-derived products in periodontics.

Second place was awarded to Thomas Hughes for his presentation on the suspension bioreactor culture of embryonic stem cells for cost-effective applications within regenerative dentistry.

Katherine O’Donnell took third place for her presentation on the role of LL-37 in periodontal wound healing.

The names of the winners and runners up were announced at the prestigious gala event held at the Ritz-Carlton Powerscourt hotel in County Wicklow.

The programme’s winner received an all-expenses paid trip to Las Vegas as an honoured guest of Dentsply International, which will take place at the American Dental Association in October. The runner up received a cash prize of £500.

Participating students each completed a research project in an area of their choice. The shortlisted entries demonstrated original thinking, and their projects were written logically and in a professional style. As always, the standard of work was incredibly high.

Entrants from 16 dental schools across the UK and Ireland saw their projects scrutinised by a panel of experts including Professor Nairn Wilson, head of school and dean of King’s College London Dental Institute; Professor Robert McConnell, University Dental School and Hospital, Cork; Dr Susan Hooper, consultant and senior lecturer at Bristol Dental School; and Dr John R Drummond, consultant senior lecturer at the University of Dundee School of Dentistry.

^1297987200^3704^Students celebrate clinician awards…^The 34th annual Student Clinician Programme Awards celebrated the hard work of the dental students involved and the valuable contribution th…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Carter-Dentsply-Awards.jpg
Students celebrate clinician awards success^^1297987200^3705^Students celebrate clinician awards…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Mcconnell-at-Dentsply-awards.jpg
Sexy fun vampire film lures young to the dentist^

A health authority has gone viral hoping that a humorous sexy vampire short film streamed on YouTube will get young patients through the doors of local NHS dentists.

Using the video-sharing site, NHS Northamptonshire has posted an advert that features a raunchy scene which goes horribly wrong when a vampire’s female victim flags up his bad breath.

Amanda Borland, Northamptonshire NHS’ primary care contract manager led the team responsible for the project which led to the creation fo the short film, Mouth Wide Open.

She says: ‘A humorous viral approach is great way to get our message across to the approximately 40,000 young people in the county that have not visited a dentist in the last two years.

‘We want them to understand the importance, and know how easy it is to find a dentist and get a check up every year. You do not have to register with a dentist and you can change your dentist whenever you like. This innovative approach has created a positive interest from the SHA, the Department of Health and other NHS regions.’

The film – which is tagged ‘Want a dentist after dark? Text ‘dentist’ to 64746 to find your nearest NHS dentist’ – has generated so much interest it’s already clocked 6,000 hits.

As part of NHS Northamptonshire’s research, a large proportion of people aged between 18-24 were found not to be visiting a dentist.

From a population of around 60,000 people in this age group approximately two-thirds (40,000) had not attended within the last two years.

This information helped the team develop a targeted campaign to the relevant audience. It held several focus groups across the county, with a range of young people from various backgrounds.

The aim of the focus groups was to find out why this audience was not accessing NHS dentistry, and what would prompt them to go. Of these:
• 92.6% of those asked said vanity
• 96.3% said bad breath
• 85.2% attracting potential partners

The focus groups also told the team virtually all participants said YouTube was their favourite video-sharing site.

For them to pass a viral film onto their friends, it would have to be funny, sexy or gory. From this feedback, the concept was created.

At the end of the viral, viewers can text the number that is shown to receive a free SMS your nearest three NHS dentists.

NHS Northamptonshire says that the benefits of a viral campaign are:
• It reaches the target audience
• It has a long shelf life
• It can continue over a long period of time, having a ‘pay it forward’ effect
• It can be promoted through so many different avenues.

Since its launch in December, it has attracted 6,000 ‘hits’.

The Department of Health has promoted it as an example of innovative good practice improving access, other SHAs and PCTs have shown interest in the campaign.

Success is being measured by the Business Services Authority figures on an ongoing basis to ascertain if access has improved.

If you wish further information then please contact Amanda Borland at NHS Northamptonshire, [email protected]
 
You can view the video by simply clicking here

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Dental implant debate reveals favoured system^

The first ever dental implant debate involving manufacturers, clinicians, academics and students, and hosted by the Peninsula Dental School, has revealed significant profession views on the industry.

Entitled Why choose our titanium? The implant debate and your choice, the event attracted four dental implant manufacturers and more than 80 delegates, including general dental practitioners, academics and year three and four dental students.

The four implant manufacturers that took part were Astra Tech, Neoss, Dentsply and Straumann. Each was given the opportunity to demonstrate their implant systems and those attending the debate were able to ask questions and vote for the system they preferred.

At the beginning of the debate, clinicians were asked to identify their preferred manufacturer of dental implants. More than 44% said they favoured Straumann, with a third stating manufacturers other than those taking part in the debate.

Following the debate, delegates were asked which if the four manufacturers they would adopt for clinical practice. Dentsply led the field, followed by Astra Tech, Neoss and Straumann.

When asked which system they thought would be easiest to use, more than half chose Neoss.

A summing up of the results of the debate and subsequent delegate votes showed that Dentsply fared best overall, followed closely by Astra Tech.

The event was well-received by delegates. Around 92% said it was ‘excellent’ or ‘good’, while 87% said it met their expectations ‘completely’ or ‘mostly’.

Mr Matthew Jerreat, acting associate director of clinical dental education and Year 4 lead at the Peninsula Dental School, commented: ‘We are very pleased that this event – we believe to be the first of its kind – was such a success and proved to be so useful to our clinical and academic colleagues, and our students.

‘We hope that we gave the four manufacturers a useful platform from which to demonstrate their products, and that this experience will help today’s dental practitioners and those of tomorrow to choose the most appropriate dental implant system for their patients, with informed knowledge and confidence.’

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‘Can you give my dog braces?’ and other odd dental requests^

Dentists are the experts when it comes to oral care, but sometimes patients have special requests for their smiles.

Prosthetic fangs, gold ‘grills’, tooth tattoos – these might sound crazy to you, but wait until you hear some other requests.
                    
The Chicago Dental Society surveyed more than 300 members to find out the strangest dental requests they’d ever received from patients. Their answers might shock you!
                    
Here they are:

10) Can you extract my tooth without anaesthesia?
              

9) Please wire my mouth shut to aid in my diet.
                    

8) Can you ID this set of dentures left in the bathroom of the bar I work at?
                    

7) I will pay you or your hygienist to floss my teeth at my office every day.
                    

6) Pull all my teeth, and just give me dentures.
                    

5) I just broke off my engagement. Can you prepare my tooth so that I can keep the diamond in it?
                    

4) Will you give me local anesthesia in my lips? I’m going in for permanent lipstick tattoos on my lips, and would like to avoid the pain
                    

3) May I have an emergency cleaning visit? It’s my high school reunion and I need a bright, white smile to face my old boyfriend.
                    

2) Can I keep the teeth you pull out of my mouth? I’d like to make a necklace out of them.
                    

And the number one strangest dental request ever received…
                    

Can you give my dog braces?
                    

The survey was conducted for the Chicago Dental Society’s 146th annual Midwinter Meeting, which will bring more than 30,000 dental professionals to Chicago 24-26 February.

The Midwinter Meeting is a forum for dentists to learn about new products, technologies, and methods.

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Dental hygienists appoint website feeder^

The British Society of Dental Hygiene & Therapy has appointed Emma Fisher DipDH DipDT to the new role of website feeder.

Emma is responsible for updating the BSDHT website (www.bsdht.org.uk) with reference material and the latest research findings essential to the roles of dental hygienist and dental therapist.

She worked as a dental nurse before taking a Diploma in Dental Hygiene and Dental Therapy and graduating in 2001.

After working in a practice, she moved to teaching and last year became a programme director at the Academic Unit of Hygiene and Therapy, University of Sheffield.

Speaking of her role as website feeder for the BSDHT, Emma said: ‘I am very interested to promote dental research and this appointment will enable BSDHT members to obtain current, relevant information which will enrich their knowledge and contribute to the continuing provision of the best possible care for patients.’

Sally Simpson, president of the BSDHT said: ‘We made this appointment in response to requests from members to have easy access to relevant information and research. We see that as another step in the ongoing development of the BSDHT website and our services to members.’

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NHS contract info goes online for dentists^

NHS Dental Services is launching an online portal for providers and performers this month.

It will enable NHS dentists to access information relating to their contract and the processing of their activity forms ultimately, a bit further down the line, in real time.

The portal will enable dentists to access this information at any time just by logging in. This will help them in managing their contracts and their practices by giving them immediate access to key information.

Currently, providers and performers need to ring the NHSDS helpdesk to enquire about any of these issues.

There will also be a section within the portal that can be used to distribute messages to providers and performers as a group, as a sub-group or even individually, by contract.

The data that will be accessible online initially includes:
• Contract start and end dates, where applicable
• Principle practice addresses and other associated addresses performer information
• Total contract value
• Contracted UDA/UOA
• Full activity breakdown, past and present
• Status of claims
• Vital signs reports
• Performance to date against contracted UDA/UOA
• PCR running total accessible all in one place.

Prior to the launch, usability testing was carried out in selected practices and the response has been very positive.

Alastair Mackay and David Campbell, co-principals of Battle Road Dental Practice in St
Leonards in Sussex, say: ‘The dental portal will be a useful tool for managing our practice, with
vital information being immediately accesible all in one place.

‘This also gives us a glimpse to what the future holds with regard to managing submissions and other correspondence with the BSA.’

NHS DS will be contacting all providers and performers in mid/late March to give them a
unique activation code allowing them to register on the portal.

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Healthier ready meals thanks to dental plaque?^

Scientists have discovered an artificial substitute for salt, which could mean healthy convenience foods and ready meals in the future.

A team of researchers suggests the compounds, found in dental plaque, could help food manufacturers slash the amount of salt used in pre-prepared meals.

The experts at the University of Nottingham found that compounds called dextrans can trick the human brain into tasting food saltier than it really is.

The team said that dextrans, which are commonly found in dental plaque, could soon be used to help food producers reduce the amount of salt in their ready meals and snack products.

Professor Bettina Wolf, who led the study, says: ‘Though reducing the salt content in processed food could significantly improve the health of the population, the detrimental change in flavour presents a major challenge as consumers generally find low salt products unacceptable.’

She adds that ‘high concentrations’ of low-molecular dextrans could be used to enhance the consumer’s perception of salt in ‘unseasoned’ foods.

The Food Standards Agency is currently running a campaign to cut salt consumption and has set targets for the food industry to reduce salt use by up to half by 2012.

Dextran is a starch-like molecule that is made by certain types of bacteria found in dental plaque.

It is also used medically as a way of reducing blood clotting.

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Dental charity stages golf tournament^

A fundraising golf tournament is being held in aid of dental charity, Bridge2Aid.

The annual golf tournament will be held at Hankley Common Golf Course, in Farnham Surrey on 30 August 30 2011.

Voted the 50th best golf course to play in the UK by Golf World magazine and soon to host the Open Championship prequalifying competition in June, Hankley Common provides the perfect setting for Bridge2Aid’s tournament this summer.

Starting the day with a light breakfast, followed by 18 holes and topped off with a delicious three-course lunch, prize giving and a special auction with a round of golf at the prestigious Loch Lomond up for grabs – this year’s tournament is set to be the best yet!

If you’re a budding golfer, keen to host a day out for your team or simply looking to support the dental charity, there are now 25 teams available to book in one of Surrey’s finest golf courses.

A team of four can be booked now for just £488.

For more information on the day or to book your team contact Stuart Thompson now on 01483 304944.  Alternatively for more information on the course, go to www.hankleycommon.co.uk.

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Mouth cancer diagnoses follow free screenings^^1298332800^3713^Mouth cancer diagnoses follow free …^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Cork-queue.jpg
Pensioner opts for braces to fix teeth she hated^

In their seventies, most people are thinking about taking things more quietly.

Yet at the age of 76, Doreen Hurley made the life changing decision to fix the teeth she had hated all her life.

As a self-confessed coward (who couldn’t even face having her ears pierced), Doreen was apprehensive about the discomfort braces might cause, yet was reassured by the advances in modern orthodontic technology and the technical knowledge of her orthodontic specialist to help her achieve an age old ambition.
 
Doreen’s dentist had previously expressed concern over the stability and state of her teeth, which were not decaying but were very crooked and had wide gap between the two central upper teeth.

Doreen’s gums were also receding, so she was initially referred to a periodontist to treat her gum disease.

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<p><em><strong>Before</strong></em></p>
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After

Once the condition of her gums had been stabilised, her mouth was considered to be in a fit state for orthodontic treatment which eventually led to her long-awaited ‘brace day’.

Doreen confesses she was anxious about having ‘a set of wires on her gnashers’, however the excitement of moving ahead with her treatment prevailed over her fears.

The support of her family encouraged Doreen still further.

Three generations of women in the Hurley family went through orthodontic treatment at the same time, and their stories, laughter and shared inability to eat toffee bonded the women together.
 
Doreen was thrilled with the end result of her treatment, and stated ‘yes yes yes, it was worth all the time, cost and trouble… my teeth looked fantastic’.

She feels eternally grateful to her orthodontic specialist Peter Huntley of Quality Orthodontics in the West Midlands, whom she describes as her ‘knight in shining armour and blue latex gloves’.
 
Doreen’s age defying story has won her a prize – a Philips Sonicare toothbrush worth £150 to ensure the future health of her gums and newly corrected teeth.

The British Orthodontic Society’s Against the Odds Competition, which was devised to raise awareness of the impact of orthodontic treatment. The competition was judged by a panel of orthodontic specialists from the BOS along with a psychologist who assessed both the impact of the treatment on the entrants along with the aesthetic results of their treatments.
 


Straight talking
Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry concerned with the growth of the teeth, jaws and face. Nearly one million people in the UK started having orthodontics last year and more adults than ever are seeking treatment. Why? Orthodontic treatment is about making the best of your teeth; it’s about improving the harmony of your mouth and jaws. Once you can bite together correctly, you can eat more comfortably and care for your teeth and gums more easily.  Orthodontics is all about creating a naturally, healthy smile.

Braces are more than a way to create a stunning smile; they can improve dental health and function.  They can be used to move teeth that are overcrowded or crooked, which are harder to brush and floss, since improper cleaning can lead to tooth decay and other dental problems.

Orthodontic treatment can also correct bite problems which could hinder eating and create a greater risk of gum disease, tooth and bone loss.  Bite problems may occur when the upper and lower jaws don’t come together properly. Uncorrected bite problems can cause teeth to wear down, make for difficult chewing, and put stress on the jawbone, producing pain.

The British Orthodontic Society is a charity set up to bring together all the dentists with special additional training in orthodontic treatment (which can be from 3 to 5 years after qualifying as a dentist).  The charity offers on-going learning and support for the orthodontic profession and funds research into new treatments. The BOS is also there to help anyone interested in orthodontic treatment; whether they are considering, undergoing or have completed treatment – or caring for someone who is.
 
To find your nearest orthodontist, obtain impartial advice or to find more information visit www.bos.org.uk.

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Scotland’s dentists to register over child protection^

Children’s Minister Adam Ingram has confirmed that Scotland’s Protecting Vulnerable Groups sheme will go live on 28 February 2011.
 
The Scheme had been due to start last November, but ministers took the decision to postpone its introduction to ensure the system which supports it is fully fit for purpose and robust.

All dental professionals in the UK must be registered with the General Dental Council (GDC) and follow othe ‘Standards for dental professionals’ (available at www.gdc-uk.org).

This document lays out six key principles that dental professionals should apply to their daily work.

Principle 5 tells registrants to ‘maintain their professional knowledge and competence’.

It goes on to say in principle 5.4 that registrants must ‘find out about laws and regulations which affect your work, premises, equipment and business and follow them’.

The GDC will have a legal obligation to share information about GDC registrants with the PVG Scheme.

It is waiting to be advised as to exactly what information it will have to share, but it is likely to be anything which could indicate that a registrant poses a risk to children or vulnerable adults.

The GDC may also receive information about its registrants from the scheme.

It has already been decided by Council that such information should not result in automatic erasure from the register, but should be considered as an allegation of impaired fitness to practise through the usual channels.

The GDC is looking carefully at how the PVG will affect registrants and what role the Council will play. It is liaising with other regulators and working out how best to share relevant information alongside existing guidance on protecting patients.
 
Employers will be sent supplies of the new PVG Scheme application forms and be kept up to date with progress by the Scottish Government.

A help service is available on 0870 609 6006 or registrants can email [email protected]

A comprehensive package of training and guidance is already available at www.disclosurescotland.co.uk.

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One-stop-shop for dental team ^

The marketing campaign for BDTA Dental Showcase 2011, complete with its very own little dental man, is now live!

The campaign has been developed in response to feedback from the dental industry.

Research by the BDTA has consistently shown that people visit Showcase to see what’s new, broaden their knowledge and take advantage of special offers, all of which are clearly conveyed through the campaign.

The crisp, clean advertisement design is in line with the general style of previous award-winning Showcase adverts which have proved popular amongst the trade and profession in the past.

Tony Reed, executive director, sas: ‘The marketing campaign for Showcase 2011 enables us to communicate the key benefits of visiting Showcase and uses fun imagery to get the message across.

‘As the UK’s largest dental exhibition, Showcase really is ‘Your one-stop dental shop’.’

BDTA Dental Showcase 2011 takes place at the NEC, Birmingham from 20-22 October 2011. For further information on the UK’s biggest dental exhibition, visit www.dentalshowcase.com.

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Stop wasting time over ‘doctor’ title, dentists say^

The General Dental Council (GDC) must prioritise its role in protecting the public and stop wasting time and resources on whether dentists should be allowed to continue using the courtesy title ‘doctor’, the British Dental Association (BDA) has argued in a letter to the GDC.

The letter has been sent ahead of a meeting of the GDC’s Council today (24 February 2011), which is due to consider a recommendation by GDC’s Standards Committee that dentists no longer be permitted to use the courtesy title.
 
The BDA’s letter argues that, at a time when the GDC faces financial constraints and significant difficulties coping with the demands of its Fitness to Practise caseload, it should focus its resources on addressing this problem, a role the BDA believes is far more crucial to the GDC’s mission of protecting the public.

The letter also challenges the GDC to publish details of the resources it has already expended in reviewing this issue and the resources it believes would be necessary to implement and enforce a new position if one is adopted.
 
The letter also warns of the significant harm a move to strip dentists of this courtesy title could do.

It points to the potential for the public’s trust in the profession to be diminished by a decision that could appear to downgrade the profession, and predicts confusion about the qualifications of many dentists from overseas whose qualifications are of an equal standing to their UK-trained counterparts but whose degree designations confer on them the right to use the ‘Dr’ title.
 
Dr Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA’s executive board, said: ‘That the GDC is choosing to devote time and resources to this issue when it should be concentrating on addressing the backlog of Fitness to Practise cases identified as an issue by the Council for Healthcare Regulatory Excellence is nothing short of astounding.

‘Dentists and dental care professionals have seen hefty increases to their annual retention fee and will not be impressed by this profligate use of the GDC’s swelled funds.
 
‘The use of this courtesy title is not an important issue for the public. A ban has the potential to confuse patients, harm the reputation of the profession and create confusion about the equivalence of dentists who have qualified in different countries.

‘We urge the GDC Council to reject the recommendation of its Standards Committee and instead concentrate on the areas of its work that deliver a real benefit to the public.’
 
The BDA’s letter is available here.

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Celebrity ambassador dentist for Oral-B^

Oral-B has appointed an ‘ambassador’ to promote its oral health range, Procter & Gamble has announced.

Dr James Russell will be the ambassador for the company and will work to highlight the long-term ‘money and mouth’ savings of investing in a good oral hygiene routine.

James is known for his work on Channel 4’s primetime Embarrassing Bodies series.

‘He has exceptional dental credentials,’ says Helen Johnson, oral care business leader at Procter & Gamble.

‘His work with Channel 4’s Embarrassing Bodies will help to heighten awareness of our campaigns and the importance of using good quality products to help achieve and maintain good oral health.’

James is also on the panel of dental experts at www.beamdental.co.uk and can help readers with any queries.

You can visit Beam’s Ask the expert page by simply clicking here

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GP and dentist open new practice^

A Merseyside GP has joined forces with a dentist to launch a new NHS dental practice which will cater for up to 3,500 people in Knowsley, thanks to a government scheme to increase access to dentists.

Origins Dental Centre has launched as part of Knowsley Health & Wellbeing’s work to improve access to dental care and is now accepting new patients at Whiston Primary Care Resource Centre.

The new service has been funded by the Department of Health’s Dental Access Programme which aims to enable more people to see a dentist.

Oral health in Knowsley is significantly poorer than the national average, particularly amongst the borough’s younger population.

This launch follows the latest NHS research* which revealed that 56% of 12-year-olds in Knowsley have at least one tooth which is decayed, missing or already has a filling.

The new service is to be headed up by general dental practitioner Dr Ravi Gollapudi who applied for the Department of Health’s Dental Access funding to launch the new service in Knowsley.

Dr Ravi has teamed up with former Knowsley-based GP, Dr Sudhaker Khandavalli, who has worked in the borough for 28 years and has helped shape the Origins Dental Centre service to ensure it caters for the specific dental health needs of people in the Knowsley.

Dr Gollapudi says: ‘I am delighted to be able to offer thousands of Knowsley residents the opportunity to access services provided by this brand new NHS practice as we know local people have been struggling to gain access to NHS dental services in the borough.

‘I will be working alongside former Knowsley GP Dr Khandavalli and his local knowledge will help us to provide the best service possible to residents.

He adds: ‘We are really focusing on preventative care as well as improving extended hours access to benefit local people and we hope to provide a good quality, friendly and flexible service which will help to bring Knowsley’s oral health in line with the national average.’

Origins Dental Centre will provide a full range of high street dental services including the core NHS service as well as a range of private treatments.

The practice will also provide frequent early morning and late evening appointments for patients in the borough.

Sue Drew, Knowsley Director of Public Health says: ‘Oral health is a priority for Knowsley Health & Wellbeing. Although good progress has been made in the borough over the past few years, there is still room for improvement and I am delighted that we can dramatically improve access to dental services in Knowsley with the launch of this new practice.’

For more information about how to register at Origins in Whiston contact 0151 426 4066.

^1298419200^3719^GP and dentist open new practice^A Merseyside GP has joined forces with a dentist to launch a new NHS dental practice which will cater for up to 3,500 people in Knowsley, th…^
Access to NHS dentists increases again^

For the fifth consecutive quarter, the number of patients seen has exceeded the March 2006 baseline; when the current dental contract was introduced.

A total of 28.9 million patients were seen in the 24-month period ending December 2010, an increase of 773,000 (2.7%) on the March 2006 baseline.

This measure has steadily increased since its lowest point in June 2008.

The percentage of the population seen by an NHS dentist exceeds the March 2006 baseline in four Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs).

Dental activity
There were an estimated 9.9 million Courses of Treatment (CoTs) in Q2 2010/11, an increase of 0.3 million (2.7%) on Q2 2009/10.

CoTs rose for each treatment band except ‘Other’ in Q2 of 2010/11 compared to the corresponding quarter in 2009/10.

There was an estimated 3.5% increase in Units of Dental Activity (UDAs) over the corresponding period.

This greater percentage increase in UDAs over CoTs is due to a higher rise in more complex, band 3 activity, which generates a higher number of UDAs than simpler, band 1 activity. There was an estimated 6.8% increase in Band 3 CoTs (and therefore UDAs) from Q2 2009/10 to Q2 2010/11, compared to an estimated 2.5% increase in Band 1 treatments.

Growth in CoTs was seen in eight SHAs from Q2 2009/10 to Q2 2010/11.

The largest percentage increase was seen in South Central SHA which saw a provisional 5.4 per cent increase in CoTs in the period.

A Department of Health spokesperson said: ‘Whilst access to NHS dentistry has improved since May 2010, we are clear that more needs to be done to increase the proportion of people able to access NHS dentistry, especially for children.

‘The White Paper set out our intention to bring in a new dental contract based on registration, capitation and quality to drive this. Our aim is to improve oral health for adults and children as well as increase access to NHS dental services, and pilots to test elements of the proposed new system will start in the spring.’

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CQC compliance guide – Step 2, Acceptance^

There is a great deal of negativity surrounding the whole issue of CQC compliance. There are three approaches which seem to prevail: the first equates to ‘the end of the world is nigh’, the second is all-consuming panic and the third is one of ‘we’ve got that covered and we are getting on with running our practice efficiently and moving on to more inspiring things’.

I personally have probably started out with the second and hope soon to be in the third, I’m sure I’m not alone. Clearly, there is still a minority who truly believe the world will end.  CQC is a set of habits – they will take a bit of effort to adopt, but once they are there, they won’t require too much more effort.
 
In the summer, a medical GP moved her practice to our building. In order to practice she had to show compliance with CQC (medics have had to comply for a couple of years).

She had previously been in an independent partnership but, under the umbrella of a private hospital, so most of the requirements had been handled by the umbrella organisation.

She knew she had to sort it for herself as well as setting up her new practice and that she would be inspected. She got her head down and diligently put the paperwork in order at the beginning.

When inspected apparently the comment from the inspector was that she was ‘the most inspirational GP she had met in a long time’.

The inspector was not commenting on her ‘box-ticking abilities’, she was commenting on the fact that she had set up something of value which was inspiring. She had done what was necessary, set it aside and got on with all the other things on the agenda.
 
CQC has been added to the 1,001 other things that we have to do in our practices and as practice owners we are in danger of feeling overwhelmed.

However, once the systems and habits are in place, we will all move on with the confidence of knowing the house is in order. We will emerge as more confident owners and leaders than before.

There is not a successful business in the civilised world which is not subject to regulation and that will have chosen to be  systematised. That is how they achieve the necessary consistency to be successful and are able to expand and diversify as they wish. 
 
Thousands of pounds are spent by many dentists each year on business gurus to take their practices forwards, many fall at the first hurdle because they can’t be bothered, first of all, to deal with the boring things – the starting place for much of this is uncannily similar to the CQC requirement.

Much of it is sound business practice, most of it is not new but has just not been regulated.  Some of it is excessive but nothing is without its advantages. Systems, that is all this is, and with it a giant accompanying checklist – anyone who has tried to systematise their practice starting from anywhere other than the very beginning has had an equally big headache, albeit a self-inflicted one.
 
CQC will soon have had its day and we will all move on – if we play it right instead of becoming a profession of ‘grumpy old men’ we will move forwards with proper line management and delegation.

Systems and policies will be in place which take the stress out of so many situations. Invaluable feedback from patients, which we are justified in asking for and can use to improve our practices still further, will be commonplace.
 
Over the years, the dentists I have met – who are in control of their practices instead of being controlled by them – are the ones who have signed up to the ‘Investors in People’-type schemes – whether officially or a version of their own design.

They have seen a need and put the necessary disciplines in place. The ones who have stood still or struggled are the ones who have felt self indignant.

The ‘grumpy old men’ will probably close their doors and find an excuse which says it was someone else’s fault… the reality is they have probably been struggling to stand still for years.  I believe you either move forwards or backwards.

I am going forward positively and there will be many others who will do so, too!

^1298505600^3720^CQC compliance guide – Step 2, Ac…^There is a great deal of negativity surrounding the whole issue of CQC compliance. There are three approaches which seem to prevail: the fir…^
Cheryl Cole’s cosmetic dentistry inspires Brits^

A recent survey has identified cosmetic dentistry as the procedure most people would be willing to undergo.

Conducted by YouGov, the survey found that around half of those questioned were not interested in having any cosmetic surgery. But of those who would consider it, cosmetic dentistry was the most popular option.

Following the research, Dr Anoop Maini, a member of the board of directors at the British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, suggested that the British public are becoming more open to the idea of cosmetic surgery because of its prevalence in the media.

He says: ‘We have seen a couple of high-profile celebrities, in particular Cheryl Cole, who have gone ahead and had some cosmetic dentistry done.

‘So, as soon as an individual smiles obviously Joe Public starts to see that and cosmetic dentistry is no longer seen as the domain of the celebrities and it has actually gone into the [consciousness] of the average person.’

^1298505600^3721^Cheryl Cole’s cosmetic dentistry in…^A recent survey has identified cosmetic dentistry as the procedure most people would be willing to undergo.Conducted by YouGov, the sur…^
Meditation – ‘it’s better than Botox’!^

Every woman wants to look 10 years younger but this means either going under the knife or spending hundreds, even thousands, of pounds on Botox and other beauty products.

There is another way!

According to Mary Pearson, author of Meditation: the stress solution, people who meditate regularly, do look younger.

‘We have up to 60,000 thoughts running through our heads every day. Our minds are crammed full of things to do, work, relationships, worries, the past, the future. We juggle all these thoughts on a daily basis and it is no wonder that we often feel exhausted and this shows on our face.

‘Stress and worry can result in lines and wrinkles,’ Mary explains.

Mary’s formula to looking 10 years younger is to mediate everyday for just 15-20 minutes.

‘Most women spend an hour a day on their beauty regime. By incorporating mediation into this routine, the results will start to show within a week. It’s truly better than Botox!’

Mary’s basic recipe for meditation:

*Find a quiet time and a quiet space

*Sit in a comfortable position that you can maintain for 15-20 minutes – for most people this is sitting on a straight backed chair, with both feet placed firmly on the floor

*Relax into your position

*Begin to focus on an activity or an object, e.g. your breath, a mantra, etc.

*If your mind wanders, gently bring it back to the object of your focus

*Let everything else go

 


Meditation: the stress solution is published by the HotHive priced £9.99 with a free CD of guided meditation. It is available from www.mary-pearson.co.uk, Amazon and all good bookstores.

 

^1298505600^3723^Meditation – ‘it’s better than Bo…^Every woman wants to look 10 years younger but this means either going under the knife or spending hundreds, even thousands, of pounds on Bo…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Blond-cover-woman.jpg
GDC postpones vote on ‘Dr’ title^

Today’s decision by the General Dental Council (GDC) to postpone a vote on whether dentists should be able to continue using the ‘Dr’ courtesy title so that an impact assessment can be carried out allows proper consideration of the issue, the BDA has said.

The decision to take the recommendation back so that the impact of the issue can be properly considered follows a warning from the BDA earlier this week that a change to the rules on this issue would create confusion, be perceived as a downgrading of dentistry and could disadvantage UK-trained dentists.
 
In a letter to the GDC, the BDA also warned that implementing a change would mean resources being wasted.
 
Dr Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA’s executive board, said: ‘The GDC’s decision to defer its vote on this issue affords time for common sense to prevail.

‘We believe a change would cause needless confusion for patients and unnecessary expense for dentists. The GDC can also concentrate on sorting out its Fitness to Practise processes, which we believe should be its priority. We are urging the GDC to reject this proposal when the vote is taken.’

^1298505600^3727^GDC postpones vote on ‘Dr’ title^Today’s decision by the General Dental Council (GDC) to postpone a vote on whether dentists should be able to continue using the &lsqu…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/dentistsign.png
Treating gum recession with Alloderm^

Traditionally, it has been not feasible to treat exposed gums, but with Alloderm it is now possible to reverse this sign of ageing and give patients back a beautiful smile by covering up areas of gum recession.
 
Historically, treatment was geared to maintenance of existing gum tissue following its loss, but now this loss can be predictably reversed, producing great and long lasting results.

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<p><em><strong>Before</strong></em></p>
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<p><strong><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/al2.jpg alt=

After

Case report
A 35-year-old woman self-referred regarding the degree of localised gum recession at site 23. She presented with localised acute dentinal sensitivity and was concerned about the cosmetic implications in relation to her smile.
 
She had been previously advised that nothing could be done and any treatment would be limited to class V composite/GIC restorations and/or desensitisation measures (Sensodyne toothpaste, topical Fluoride application).
 
Examination revealed 3mm of localised gum recession, traumatic in origin with excellent oral hygiene and a well informed and well motivated patient.

The first part of the treatment was to re-educate the patient in stringent oral hygiene measures with emphasis on a corrective brushing technique.
 
Radiographs were then taken to assess interproximal bone levels and the vascularity in the area of potential treatment. Following this the corrective aesthetic gum grafting procedure was discussed in some detail and the basis of how Alloderm work was again discussed in some detail.
 
The stringent post-operative protocol was again re-emphasised.
 
Treatment was scheduled and carried out.

Discussion
Alloderm is donated human tissue which is processed to remove all cells resulting in a product which promotes rapid revascularisation.

The graft is then ready for implantation to help the body begin its own tissue regenerative process. It exhibits a remarkable versatility to convert into functional tissues that provide structural support.

It is widely used in medicine for plastic and reconstructive surgery and is used in challenging hernia and abdominal surgeries, breast reconstruction, treatment and repair of burns and now can be clinically applied in cosmetic gum grafting techniques.

It works by repairing damaged tissue by providing a foundation for new tissue regeneration. The components preserved in Alloderm contain the information that will help a patient’s own tissue to grow into the graft after placement.

Soon after placement, blood flows from tissue into the Alloderm. Next, the patient’s own cells move into the Alloderm and begin the process of tissue regeneration. Over time, Alloderm allows regrowth of healthy gum tissue.
 
After surgery, the patient will have some initial swelling and possibly some mild bruising. One should avoid pulling on the lip to look at the area of surgery or to persistently rub the tongue over the area. This could lead to increased swelling and delayed healing.

Brushing the area of surgery should be avoided for seven to ten days as brushing the site could damage the graft in the early healing phase. Patients should continue brushing in all other areas as normal.

Healing times differ from person to person and also on the complexity of the procedure. Excellent results would be visible immediately after surgery with complete maturation of the graft taking up to three months to occur.

The body’s natural healing process will stimulate your cells to enter the graft and begin the regeneration and integration process shortly after surgery.

Summary
There are minimal side-effects to this simple procedure with some initial swelling and possible mild bruising after the Alloderm graft has been fitted, similar to that of any other minor cosmetic procedure.
 
During this simple and fast healing process, gums appear natural and there is no sign of the Alloderm graft, just your own restored and healthy gum tissue.

Consider this a quick fix treatment that lasts a lifetime and a procedure with nominal downtime unlike other invasive dental surgery
 
Alloderm allows for the predictable treatment of receding gums and is a major breakthrough at both cosmetic and wider health levels.


Current Concepts in Soft Tissue Managements around Teeth and Dental Implants
Lecture + Hands On Training (6hrs CPD)
Course objectives:

 

• It will present the aetiology of gingival recession and the different techniques used to enhance the aesthetic emergence profile of site and the health of the peri-implant tissues. Oral plastic surgical procedures like connective tissue augmentation, mucogingival treatment and special soft tissue flap designs for predictable root surface coverage will be presented.
 
• Biological and clinical aspects of simple and advanced soft tissue surgical techniques including the key elements for esthetic success will be presented, with particular relevance to the peri-implant gingival framework
 
• Flap design, flap management and suturing methods
 
• Treatment plan clinical scenarios requiring soft tissue grafting around implants and natural teeth
 
• Decision making based on outcome of available soft tissue protocols and biomaterials
 
Dates: Tuesday 3 May 2011 and Tuesday 26 July 2011
Cost: £375 inclusive of lunch + refreshments
 

For more information, email [email protected] or visit www.drsimondarfoor.com.

^1298505600^3725^Treating gum recession with Alloder…^Traditionally, it has been not feasible to treat exposed gums, but with Alloderm it is now possible to reverse this sign of ageing and give …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/al2.jpg
How to create an award-winning dental website^

I feel extremely privileged to be asked to write an article for www.dentistry.co.uk following the success of TheSmileLounge.org.uk website at the 2010 awards in December – Best Website and Best Specialist Referral Website awards.

It’s not possible for me to write about ‘What makes an outstanding website’ without touching on some fundamentals of individual marketing and design. This will become apparent later but, for now, let’s consider why having a good website is essential.

Why have a website?
Consider how many times a month someone recommends a product, service or offer to you about anything from the latest gadgets to fashion, furniture, business or a holiday. Now recall the ‘digging’ you do without fear of hard sell from staff or feeling like you have to book that haircut because ‘you’re here now’.

That’s right, in our own time, at our leisure, anonymously; we all ‘surf’. On computers, laptops even phones and now via the TV. Customers can compare competitors, prices and service standards without even giving you, your team or the expensive new refurbishment the chance to wow them! Consumer e-integration is growing fast. Your competitors have websites, Tweet patients, have apps supporting and educating viewers, why? Simple. To remain at the forefront of people’s minds when choices are made about where to invest.

But not just any website!
The worldwide web is a technological phenomenon. That means competition. A search for ‘dentist’ in any town of any developed country will produce numerous results for consumers to sift prior to any commitment. I visit lots of practices and see numerous websites. I have concluded that there are generally three bands (excluding not having a website!) that dental websites fit into:
• Extraordinary/innovative
• Common
• Unbecoming.

Unbecoming websites
You do not want one of these. They are more damaging than no site at all. We would all drive past a car showroom if its forecourt presented dented, damaged stock, without even bothering to find out what they may have inside. Add a large dollop of ‘this is my personal healthcare we’re talking about’ and you see my point.

Common websites
These websites tend to be ‘nice’. Pleasant to look at, generally [generically] informative and structured noticeably similarly. I have wondered whether some sites are identical with the exception of the logo.

Developers need to be competitive and profitable and templates enable reduced build-time, therefore increased profits. This is not a criticism, merely an observation, but it won’t create an upper echelon site.

Extraordinary, innovative websites
If a website captures imagination, a desire to view more, has clear navigation, provides everything the viewer expects, and more, then you will have a successful website. This is achieved differently depending on the business. For example, Amazon’s website (give or take a fantastic business model) isn’t highly defined with design – it doesn’t need to be. It does what I identify above by offering loads of products on a personalised basis at low prices. Compare this to the latest Audi UK website, full of design and looking very innovative.

So, how does Fruit do it?
When we start a website project, we always use a set process, because it works. We will always create a new design and a uniqueness to a site to prevent slipping into the ‘common website’ category.
I have always developed a site the same way and I keep it simple. We work with clients along two strands:
• Objective elements: These are not specific to the creation of your website, but without consideration your website will certainly fail. Each element impacts upon the other and ultimately creates, at the core of your business, your brand.
As a synopsis, in order for your practice to be a success, you must clearly establish what products/services you provide. In turn, you must determine who you wish to target your products/services at and you must ascertain the most appropriate message to send to your audience. This is a good time to also point out that the very best website alone won’t ensure your business will succeed. Brand strength will. This will form the subject of a later article in its own right. However, we are happy to support you with all branding issues.
• Creative elements: These are specific to the creation of your website. Each element impacts on the other and these are all ultimately controlled at their core by a budget.

Our secret…
Once a budget is established, our process begins with content. We entirely disregard design or structure at this stage. Depending on the amount of content, and how it is to be presented we then review the budget; and then consider a structure and navigational path for the site, pages, etc. Only towards the end of this stage do we then start to consider design artwork concepts. The three elements then come together to form the completed site.

While we work, we overlay the two strands of elements. Your message forms how content is delivered; your products/services determine the structure of the site, and the design aims to attract the appropriate audience.

Take, for example, an orthodontic practice, similar services but the message would be entirely different if we were creating for a children’s NHS practice, as opposed to a private practice aimed at career adults, while design would differ again – although maybe not the message – if the orthodontist had chosen to target young adult actresses and dancers.

Our secret is that we don’t rush the process. If you expect a site in a week, there are people out there who can and will do that and create one of the first two categories I mention, but we did create the best website and best specialist referral website in the UK!

There is a raft of data used to measure the success of websites. How many new visitors it achieves, how long they spend on each page, and so on. In a nutshell, the more time someone spends on your website, the more likelihood of them investing in your business or returning in future to invest.

Imagine your website is the window to your business. If there isn’t one – or people don’t like what they see – they won’t come through the door!

^1298505600^3726^How to create an award-winning dent…^I feel extremely privileged to be asked to write an article for www.dentistry.co.uk following the success of TheSmileLounge.org.uk website a…^
‘Hollywood smile ruined my life’^

Chanetelle Houghton claims that getting a Hollywood smile has ruined her life.

The Big Brother star says having veneers fitted has left her in so much pain that she can’t eat or kiss her boyfriend Rav Wilding.

The 27-year-old is so distraught at the results she is reported to be seeking legal advice.

Chantelle had veneers fitted a few days after Christmas after jumping at the chance to make her teeth look whiter and straighter but noe she’s claiming to be seeking legal advice.

For the full story click here

^1298592000^3728^’Hollywood smile ruined my life’^Chanetelle Houghton claims that getting a Hollywood smile has ruined her life.The Big Brother star says having veneers fitted has left her i…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/d7a83f24ac3c7710dbf7097f9fc6bb96_extra.jpg
Public needs to prepare for orthodontic treatment changes, warns BDA^^1298592000^3729^Public needs to prepare for orthodo…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/girls-with-braces.jpg
Dental company wins Sunday Times prize^

The team at Practice Plan are ecstatic after not only making the prestigious ‘Sunday Times Top 100 Companies to Work For’ for a second year running, but also climbing up a further three places from last year’s position!

The company, who now hold the 31st place in the list, beating off stiff competition from hundreds of different organisations, recently took a team of ten from across the business, including

Managing director, Nick Dilworth, and travelled to London for the black tie ceremony hosted by BBC newsreader, Bill Turnbull, where they collected their award.

Nick Dilworth, managing director, explained: ‘To go to 31st from 34th last year based on 567 entries for this category, whereby only 50% were in last year’s Top 100 is a phenomenal achievement.

‘This is worthy recognition for the continued effort and focus of the whole team to drive the business forward. I was particularly delighted to learn that when staff where asked about their overall view of their job, 87% responded that they love their job.’

This year’s list was based on feedback from over 37,500 employees, making it the most comprehensive survey of its kind in the country, and the reputation of the list continues to build, attracting even more organisations each year, which makes gaining a place increasingly difficult.

Kerrie Harding, quality assurance, who was at the awards, said: ‘I am proud and lucky to work at Practice Plan. The number of benefits and support we receive as employees are exceptional, everyone gives 110% on a day-to-day basis – and, most importantly, we have fun while we’re doing it!’

Practice Plan doubled its celebrations after also being named an ‘extraordinary’ company to work for, having achieved 3 Star Status in the Best Companies Accreditation, also for the second year running.

Out of the 1,165 organisations who applied for the award, only 84 received the ultimate 3 Star Status, Practice Plan being one of them.

For more information on Practice Plan, please call 01691 684135 or visit www.practiceplan.co.uk.

^1298937600^3739^Dental company wins Sunday Times pr…^The team at Practice Plan are ecstatic after not only making the prestigious ‘Sunday Times Top 100 Companies to Work For’ for a …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/practiceplan2010.jpg
Urgent action needed on RQIA information gap ^^1298592000^3730^Urgent action needed on RQIA inform…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/urgent-stamp.jpg
Brit winner Jessie J marks top spot with ‘whiter teeth’ ^

Brit award winner Jessie J revealed that she celebrated her single reaching number one by getting her teeth whitening.

Appearing on BBC’s Graham Norton Show, she told the chat show host she had some cosmetic dental treatment after her new single, Price Tag, reached the top of the UK’s number one single charts.

Still on a high from her Brit Awards Critics Choice win, Jessie J, 22, told Graham Norton: ‘I got my teeth whitened. I really did though. You think I’m joking, I’m really not.’

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<p>
<p>Due to overwhelming demand, Jessie’s album has had its release date brought forward by four weeks.</p>
<p>Jessie J’s first ever UK and Ireland headlining tour kicks off at the end of March where she will be playing the following dates:</p>
<p>To watch the full TV interview, click <a href=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5PSK-FAtuU>here</a></p>
<p>^1298851200^3731^Brit winner Jessie J marks top spot…^Brit award winner Jessie J revealed that she celebrated her single reaching number one by getting her teeth whitening.Appearing on BBC&…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/JessieJ.jpg<br />
WIN a Clarisonic Skin Cleansing System^
<p>With spring just around the corner, what better way to celebrate the onset of some sunshine with a new skincare routine to revitalise, refresh and renew your skin.<br /> <br />And Beam is offering THREE lucky subscribers the opportunity to WIN a fabulous Clarisonic Skin Cleansing System, which retails in the shops £175.<br /> <br />This is one of the most amazing skincare products out there and will get your skin glowing and radiant, leaving you feeling fabulous for the months to come. <br /> <br />The System – recommended by leading dermatologists – goes beyond basic cleansing and its benefits go beyond just clean skin: Clarisonic improves the appearance of skin tone and reduces the appearance of pore size.<br /> <br />It uses sonic technology to deeply yet gently to clear pores and prepare the skin for increased absorption, releasing your moisturiser’s full potential.<br /> <br />Developed by the lead inventor of the Sonicare sonic toothbrush, the Clarisonic is widely used by cosmetic surgeons and spas and cleans without abrasion or harsh chemicals, making it gentle enough for use twice a day.<br /> <br /><span class=blue_smheadfont>Studies prove the Clarisonic is:</span><br />• Six times more make up removal<br />• Twice as effective at removing grease and dirt<br />• 61% better absorption of vitamin C after cleansing compared with manual cleansing<br />• Gentle enough for use on skin of subjects with rosaea <br />Plus:<br />• After eight weeks, there was a greater improvement in the reduction of the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles on the side of the face where the Clarisonic was used <br />• 81% of participants reported better than previous shaving methods with softer skin and reduced irritation            <br />• 83% of participants reported healthier skin<br />• 70% of participants reported fewer blemishes<br />• 69% of participants reported fewer dry patches<br />• 68% reported decreased appearance of pore size<br /> <br /><span class=blue_smheadfont>Benefits</span><br />• Leaves skin feeling and looking younger and smoother<br />• Cleanses so well that products absorb better<br />• Gentle enough for twice daily use<br />• Helps reduce oily areas, dry skin patches and blemishes<br />• Helps reduce the appearance of visible pores<br />• Reduces the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles<br /> <br /><span class=blue_smheadfont>Skin types and concerns</span><br />• For all skin types<br />• Gentle for use on rosacea, seborrhea and acne<br />• Used and recommended by leading dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons for pre-treatment cleansing and daily use at home<br /> <br /><span class=blue_smheadfont>Features</span><br />• Cordless brush handle<br />• Countertop charging cradle with a universal charger <br />• Sensitive brush head<br />• Waterproof for use in the shower<br />• Proprietary T-TIMER for thorough and even cleansing<br />• 30-day feel and see guarantee<br />• Two-year warranty<br /> <br />To WIN a Clarisonic Skin Cleansing System, simply subscribe to Beam and then click <a href=../../beam/special-offers/index.php>here</a></p>
<p>
<p><a href=../../beam/special-offers/index.php><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/clarisonicx.jpg alt=

^1298851200^3732^WIN a Clarisonic Skin Cleansing Sys…^With spring just around the corner, what better way to celebrate the onset of some sunshine with a new skincare routine to revitalise, refre…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Woman-using-brush.jpg
Go shopping now, dentists urged^

As the general trend for ‘tightening one’s belt’ continues in the UK’s current climate of economic uncertainty, there is some good news that may encourage dental practitioners to purchase certain items outstanding on their surgery shopping lists.

Accountant Matthew Watson, at Ballard Dale Syree Watson, provides services to a range of clients in the healthcare sector, including many dental practices.

He suggests it may be a good time to remind dentists and dental technicians to consider making any major capital expenditure before April 2012.

The annual investment allowance (AIA) allows most businesses to gain tax relief for their annual capital expenditure, with the current maximum amount being £100,000 per annum.

This allowance will be reduced to £25,000 with effect from April 2012, a huge reduction and loss of potential relief for businesses with large capital outlays after this date.

With items such as wall-mounted X-rays, dental chairs, sterilisers, dental cabinetry and modern equipment technology, £100,000 can soon be spent on necessary capital purchases so it makes sense for dentists to consider making these purchases before April next year.

Matthew says: ‘This is such a large reduction in tax relief that perhaps now is a good time to remind dental practitioners everywhere, that if they are looking to replace or update certain capital items it makes more sense to consider purchasing those items before April 2012. I would suggest that an initial review of a practice’s assets is a good starting point.

‘This allowance means that you receive tax relief now rather than later.  If you spent £50,000 on equipment pre April 2012 and are a 40% tax payer you will save £20,000 in tax relief. If you leave it until after April 2012 you would receive tax relief of £10,000 in the first year, £2,500 in the second year, £1,875 in the third year and decreasing savings over subsequent years. In fact it would take over 10 years to achieve a similar tax saving achieved in one year under the 100% annual investment allowance. This is certainly a valuable relief.’

 


For further information, contact Matthew Watson on 01905 794504 or email
[email protected]

 

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Student scoops top dental award ^

A dental nurse from the University of Hull is being recognised with a special award after scoring the highest mark in a recent national exam.

Emma Jobling from Hedon, near Hull, scored 95% on a paper as part of her Dental Radiography for Dental Nurses and Hygienists course.

The paper is negatively marked – meaning points are scored for correct answers but also deducted if they are incorrect – which makes high scores very hard to achieve.

A total of 737 candidates took the same paper in the UK.

As a result of her exams, Emma has been named the winner of the Outstanding candidate award by the National Examining Board for Dental Nurses in association with the British Society for Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology; she’ll now attend a special awards ceremony on 4 March in Edinburgh.

Emma, who combined her studies while working at the East Yorkshire Dental Studios, says: ‘I was absolutely shocked when I found out my result and to be honest it’s still sinking in.

‘The course was brilliant, there was a lot to take in from both a theoretical and a practical point of view but I really enjoyed it.

‘Initially, I was told my portfolio had to go back to the examiners and I thought Oh no so to then be told I’d got the highest mark in the country was a complete surprise.’

Students, who are already qualified dental care professionals, are taught about a range of topics in relation to dental radiography including X-ray production, radiation physics, imaging and radiographic techniques.

Programme leader Victoria Hewson says: ‘I am absolutely delighted for Emma; this is not an easy exam by any means and to score so highly is a real testament to her achievements.’

‘The syllabus is extremely challenging and coupled with the marking system shows just how well Emma has done. We feel that we’re producing high quality dental nurses and this really demonstrates it.’

^1298851200^3733^Student scoops top dental award ^A dental nurse from the University of Hull is being recognised with a special award after scoring the highest mark in a recent national exam…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Emma-Jobling.jpg
Oral care pathway for babies^

The company behind the first chewable toothbrush for toddlers has launched a unique range of oral hygiene products for young children.
 
Brush-Baby’s innovative oral care pathway is designed to help prevent dental problems in young mouths through a gentle daily routine.
 
The launch follows the success of the Brush-Baby Chewable Toothbrush as an alternative to using just a smaller version of an adult toothbrush.      
 
Company founder and director Dominique Tillen said: ‘Brush-Baby was started after I found my own infant daughter wasn’t interested in learning to brush, she just wanted to chew the toothbrush.
 
‘Now we want to go further and provide mums with a range of products that create an easy to follow pathway for good oral hygiene from birth to childhood, one that which help prevent dental problems and promote good oral health.’
 
There are five products in the Brush-Baby pathway, all specially made and styled to help children get into good habits:
 
• For babies up to 16 months old, Brush-Baby DentalWipes are ideal for establishing a healthy environment for gums and new teeth. The product is formulated and textured to cleanse delicate mouths and baby teeth when unable to brush. The parent puts a wipe on their index finger and wipes around baby’s gums, tongue and cheeks. Brush-Baby DentalWipes are fluoride free and contain xylitol, a naturally occurring sugar that fights the bacteria that cause tooth decay.
 
• For infants up to three years old, Brush-Baby Chewable Toothbrush is a versatile chewable toothbrush and teether that they can use themselves. The dentist-designed brush has been produced because babies naturally want to chew. As they do so, it helps to clean teeth, massages gums and soothes tender teething gums. It may be used with or without toothpaste for brushing and cooled in the fridge for soothing relief during teething. The Brush-Baby Chewable Toothbrush is made of soft and safe silicone with two rows of gentle silicone bristles that clean and massage upper and lower gums and teeth at the same time. It is available in pale pink, pale blue and clear. 
 
• Brush-Baby Baby & Toddler Toothpaste for ages up to three years is unique in that it contains 10% Xylitol, a natural sugar that prevents decay-causing bacteria from producing the acid that rots teeth. It has lower fluoride, is SLS free and is low-foaming which babies can tolerate better. The toothpaste comes in a delicious applemint flavour that encourages babies and toddlers to care for their teeth.

• For children aged 3-6 years, the Brush-Baby FlossBrush helps to remove the plaque between teeth that regular brushing misses. It has an easy-grip handle and a soft, interdental flossing bristle design. Short bristles clean the surface of the teeth while long bristles reach between the teeth and the gingival margin or gumline. The Flossbrush can help address the risk of decay, cavities and gingivitis in developing teeth. It also has a natural silver antibacterial action to reduce the growth of bacteria on the bristles.

•  So that the positive effects of xylitol can be continued, Brush-Baby Children’s Toothpaste has been developed for ages 3-6 years. Like its forerunner this toothpaste contains 10% xylitol, fluoride and is SLS free. It comes in a fun Tutti-Fruity flavour to encourage children to brush.
 
Brush-Baby was launched in October 2008 with a surge of interest in the chewable toothbrush prompting online orders and retail interest. Among the stockists are supermarkets, pharmacies and specialist baby shops.
 
The launch of Brush-Baby’s oral care pathway for children is in line with current thinking on encouraging oral hygiene in children, including the government’s 2010 commitment to put an ‘additional focus’ on early years’ oral health.

According to Department of Health figures, some 30% of British children suffer from decay in an average of 3.5 teeth. 
 
Dr John Milne, who chairs the British Dental Association’s general dental practitioners’ committee, has welcomed the government’s move. He says: ‘Improving oral health of children needs to start much earlier than primary school. Local prevention needs to be targeted virtually from birth to be effective in improving oral health of children.’

^1298851200^3737^Oral care pathway for babies^The company behind the first chewable toothbrush for toddlers has launched a unique range of oral hygiene products for young children. …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/babysmile.png
Survivor urges smokers to give up^

Mouth cancer charity, the Mouth Cancer Foundation, is urging everyone to have regular dental checks, especially if they smoke.

There is a proven link between smoking and mouth cancer and dentists are more likely to detect the early symptoms of mouth cancer.

Early detection can save lives.

85% [1] of head and neck cancers are linked to tobacco use. People who use both tobacco and alcohol are at greater risk for developing these cancers than people who use either tobacco or alcohol alone.
 
The founder of the Mouth Cancer Foundation Dr Joshi says: ‘Research shows that 3 in 4 people who have mouth cancer have smoked at some point in their lives [2].

‘Most people are now aware that smoking carries serious health risks. Smoking drastically increases the risk of Mouth Cancer. It is a thoroughly debilitating disease. We are encouraging everyone to have regular checks at their dentists as dentists know the symptoms to look out for.’ 
 
Every year, nearly one million [3] smokers quit on No Smoking Day, which this year takes place next week on Wednesday 9 March.

People who quit smoking and attend a mouth screening will be taking steps to drastically improve their health.
 
‘I asked my surgeon what would have happened if I hadn’t found the lump when I did. He said that in just months I would have ended up with a lump the size of a golf ball on my neck and I’d have been coughing up blood. Simply, I wouldn’t have survived,’ says Keith Hern.
 
Throat cancer survivor and ‘Bangers and Mash [4] author Keith Hern, 52, from Thames Ditton, Surrey, knows only too well the dangers of smoking.

It was a normal Saturday in May 2007 when Keith discovered a lump in his neck while at home with his wife Madeleine, 52, and their daughter Jessica, now 17.  He was diagnosed with an aggressive form of throat cancer – and he’s since beaten it twice.
 
In his book, a photographic account of his own battle with throat cancer, Keith admitted to smoking and drinking too much.

He says: ‘I drank a fair amount – probably about 50 units a week – and I also used to smoke about 25 cigarettes a day, until I gave up 12 years ago.

‘I ate a lot of red meat and dairy products and consumed too much sugar and coffee – a poor diet, smoking and high alcohol consumption are linked to head and neck cancers.’
 
Keith needed two operations, one to remove a primary tumour on the back of his tongue and another to remove a secondary tumour, which was a lump in his neck.

He then underwent months of invasive chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which left him physically and emotionally drained.
 
In November 2009, Keith was dealt a bitter blow when a routine two-year check-up revealed the cancer had returned. This time it was in Keith’s chest.

Again Keith underwent treatment, involving cycles of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. He did not have any operations, as the chest area was too hard to access. Keith finished his treatment in May 2010 and, in June, was told the amazing news that the cancer had gone.
 
Dr Joshi adds: ‘If all smokers could see the nightmare Keith and many of my patients live with every day I’m sure they would give up smoking immediately.

‘This is a good day to stop. Keith’s story also highlights the importance of oral cancer screening which can detect early  signs of lumps and abnormalities in the head and neck area.’

References
[1] http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Sites-Types/head-and-neck 
[2] http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/about-cancer/cancer-questions/mouth-cancer-how-to-reduce-your-risk#cause
[3] www.nosmokingday.org.uk
[4] Bangers & Mash, by Keith Hern (MX Publishing, £9.99) is his written and photographic account of his ordeal. It is available from www.throatcancersurvivor.co.uk or www.amazon.co.uk.


For more information, visit the Mouth Cancer Foundation at www.mouthcancerfoundation.org

In the UK, nearly 8000 people are diagnosed with Mouth Cancer every year.  Cancers can occur in any part of the mouth, tongue, lips, and adjacent areas like the throat, salivary glands, pharynx, larynx, sinus, and other sites in the head and neck area. In its very early stages, these Mouth Cancers can be easy to ignore.
 
Symptoms include:
1. An ulcer or white or red patch anywhere in the mouth that does not heal within 3 weeks
2. A lump or swelling anywhere in the mouth, jaw or neck that persists for more than 3 weeks
3. A difficulty in swallowing, chewing or moving the jaw or tongue
5. A numbness of the tongue or other area of the mouth
6. A feeling that something is caught in the throat
7. A chronic sore throat or hoarseness that persists more than 6 weeks
8. An unexplained loosening of teeth with no dental cause

^1298851200^3735^Survivor urges smokers to give up^Mouth cancer charity, the Mouth Cancer Foundation, is urging everyone to have regular dental checks, especially if they smoke.There is a pro…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/stopsmoke.jpg
Win £2,000 worth of eMAX restorations^

An award-winning dental laboratory is offering readers the chance to win £2,000 worth of eMAX restorations by simply matching ‘before’ mouths to ‘after’ smiles.

Knight Design Dental, who will be on stand C55 at this week’s Dentistry Show, has amazing prizes up for grabs.

First prize is £2,000 worth of eMAX restorations, second prize is £500 worth of e.max restorations and third prize is £300 worth of eMAX restorations – all produced by Knight Dental Design.

There are 20 prizes of a 15% discount off an eMAX case produced by Knight Dental Design, plus  two trips to Liechtenstein where the winners can take part in the Competence in Composite course at Ivoclar-Vivadent.

There is also a free Multilink Cement Kit available for the first 50 entries.

All cases featured in the competition were produced with IPS eMAX ceramic and all answers can be found at www.knightdentaldesign.co.uk.

Simply click here to enter… but hurry!


Five time UK Dental Lab of the Year Winner, the lab has a long established reputation for aesthetic excellence, technical accuracy and outstanding customer service.

Established in 1982, Knight Dental Design provides cosmetic, restorative and implant solutions for quality conscious dentists and their patients.

 

 

 

 

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Win 15 hours of FREE CPD ^

All dental professionals have a chance to win 15 hours of CPD – via a FREE subscription to one of FMC’s dental journals – by simply filling in an online questionnaire.
 
FMC, Dentistry’s Information Centre, is keen to ensure all dentists and dental care professionals have gained all CPD required by the GDC.
 
Simply click here to go to a questionnaire featuring 11 questions about you, your team and your CPD hours.
 
It only takes a few minutes to complete. Submit your answers, contact details and GDC number and all entries will be entered into a prize draw.
 
The winner will be chosen at random and notified by email and/or phone by 31 July 2011.
 
Visit www.fmc.co.uk to select the journal of your choice which will give you the chance to attain at least 15 hours of CPD for FREE!

 


Terms and conditions:
– Employees of Finlayson Media Communications and their relatives are not eligible to enter this competition
– dentistry.co.uk reserves the right to publish the name of the winner in the dental media
– Entries may be used for publicity purposes (no personal details will be disclosed)
 
Closing date 31 July 2011

 

^1307577600^4100^Win 15 hours of FREE CPD ^All dental professionals have a chance to win 15 hours of CPD – via a FREE subscription to one of FMC’s dental journals – by sim…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Journals-strip-1.jpg
FREE Zoom! tooth whitening prize makes Rich’s day^

Beam is delighted to announce its first Zoom! tooth whitening winner of the month!

Richard Barrett-Constantinou, 25, of Southgate, north London, is beaming as he’s the first reader to be randomly picked from the list of new subscribers.

A delighted Richard, a product validation engineer, says: ‘I would like tooth whitening to make my smile dazzle. My teeth have been tarnished over the years due to the cups of tea I drink – my cup is rarely empty.

‘I would love to have my teeth whitened because I think it would be a much-needed boost to my confidence!

You too could win a smile makeover, courtesy of a Zoom! tooth whitening treatment and the team here at Beam.

Simply register with our website and click here.


*Zoom Whitening Terms and Conditions

Almost anyone can benefit from the Zoom treatment, however the treatment may not be as effective for some as it is others. A consultation is recommended to ensure no underlying oral health issues. You may want to treat existing issues before a whitening treatment and any patient who is periodontic involved, exhibits failing restorations or is otherwise in an unhealthy oral   state may be disqualified from the treatment.

Research has not evaluated possible effects of whitenin  procedure on all patient types. We recommend the following whitening candidates consult a medical doctor before a treatment:
a. Pregnant and lactating mothers
b. Those currently treated by their physician for a serious illness or disorder e.g. immune compromised, AIDS and uncontrolled diabetes, etc.
c. Children under the age of 13 years
d. Light sensitive individuals, including those on PUVA (Psoralen + UV Radiation) or other photochemotherapy.
e. Patients taking any photo-reactive drugs or substances, whether over-the-counter (O.T.C.), prescription or homeopathic.

Zoom only whitens natural teeth. Zoom whitening will not change the colour of crowns/bridges, veneers or fillings. Any restorations in the front of your mouth will need to be replaced so that the colour matches. This cost will not be covered as part of the whitening treatment and will be   something you need to take into consideration before agreeing to the treatment.

There are a variety of participating dental practices across the UK that will carry out the treatment for you, we will endeavour to find the practice closest to you, however we cannot guarantee they will be in your home town, so you will need to be prepared travel a distance within reason. The  journey is at your own expense. Only the winner of the competition can have the Zoom! treatment the treatment cannot be transferred to another person and cannot be exchange for a cash equivalent.

 

^1298937600^3741^FREE Zoom! tooth whitening prize ma…^Beam is delighted to announce its first Zoom! tooth whitening winner of the month!Richard Barrett-Constantinou, 25, of Southgate, north Lond…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/winner1.jpg
Judge rules against dentists in HSE case^^1298937600^3738^Judge rules against dentists in HSE…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Four-courts-dublin.jpg
Keeping tabs on dental instruments^

New regulations such as HTM 01-05 and CQC have meant that dental practices need to do more to protect patients and ensure staff safety.
 
Steritrak, from Carestream Dental, offers dentists a way to simplify the reusable instrument auditing and tracking process, helping to save time and reduce the incidence of human error.
 
Employing a database driven by a barcode system, Steritrak can help you keep tabs on re-usable instruments with ease, helping to identify where in the cycle each instrument tray is at any given time, as well as notifying practice staff when trays are reaching the end of their usable shelf life.
 
Steritrak also makes light work of health and safety protocol auditing, and is able to generate a range of in-depth reports quickly and easily, even listing details such as which instrument trays were used on which patients! Thanks to the quick and user-friendly barcode scanning system, keyboard data entry is also kept to a minimum, streamlining workflow and saving valuable work-time.
 
Fully compatible with the R4 practice management system, Steritrak offers dental practices of all types a headache-free way of processing instrument decontamination safely and effectively.
 
HTM 01-05 compliance is now easier than ever, thanks to Steritrak  – another practical innovation from Carestream Dental.
 
For more information, contact Carestream Dental (formally known as PracticeWorks) on 0800 169 9692 or visit www.practiceworks.co.uk.

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Dental plan company wins Sunday Times prize^

The team at Practice Plan are ecstatic after not only making the prestigious ‘Sunday Times Top 100 Companies to Work For’ for a second year running, but also climbing up a further three places from last year’s position!

The company, who now hold the 31st place in the list, beating off stiff competition from hundreds of different organisations, recently took a team of ten from across the business, including

Managing director, Nick Dilworth, and travelled to London for the black tie ceremony hosted by BBC newsreader, Bill Turnbull, where they collected their award.

Nick Dilworth, managing director, explained: ‘To go to 31st from 34th last year based on 567 entries for this category, whereby only 50% were in last year’s Top 100 is a phenomenal achievement.

‘This is worthy recognition for the continued effort and focus of the whole team to drive the business forward. I was particularly delighted to learn that when staff where asked about their overall view of their job, 87% responded that they love their job.’

This year’s list was based on feedback from over 37,500 employees, making it the most comprehensive survey of its kind in the country, and the reputation of the list continues to build, attracting even more organisations each year, which makes gaining a place increasingly difficult.

Kerrie Harding, quality assurance, who was at the awards, said: ‘I am proud and lucky to work at Practice Plan. The number of benefits and support we receive as employees are exceptional, everyone gives 110% on a day-to-day basis – and, most importantly, we have fun while we’re doing it!’

Practice Plan doubled its celebrations after also being named an ‘extraordinary’ company to work for, having achieved 3 Star Status in the Best Companies Accreditation, also for the second year running.

Out of the 1,165 organisations who applied for the award, only 84 received the ultimate 3 Star Status, Practice Plan being one of them.

For more information on Practice Plan, please call 01691 684135 or visit www.practiceplan.co.uk.

^1298937600^3740^Dental plan company wins Sunday Tim…^The team at Practice Plan are ecstatic after not only making the prestigious ‘Sunday Times Top 100 Companies to Work For’ for a …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/practiceplan2010.jpg
E-services help improve dental care^

Carestream Dental understands that time spent on operational tasks is time lost to patients or growing your business. That’s why it has introduced a host of E-Services designed to save your team time and improve the service you offer patients.
 
These include:
• R4 Dental Web – Reliable, secure broadband access supported by a UK-based team and compatible with all Carestream software and equipment
• R4 DentAssist – IT Support whenever or wherever you need it via broadband
• R4 Online Backup and Recovery Service – a stress-free automatic back-up service designed to protect patient and financial records by storing them safely offsite
• R4 Patient Data Exchange – this convenient system, developed in conjunction with Denplan, helps practices keep track of record changes and unpaid patients without having to waste hours updating records
• R4 Credit Card Processing – for mistake-free, smoother payment transactions. No need to enter the correct amount or have a dedicated phone line – R4 does it all for you via broadband
• R4 Text Messaging – Send appointment reminders to patients via text message and allow them to reply, reducing ‘no shows’ by up to 50%
 
Using its extensive technological knowledge and understanding of the dental sector, Carestream Dental has developed a number of solutions designed to simply your life and improve the efficiency of your practice.
 
For more information, contact Carestream Dental on 0800 169 9692 or visit                       www.carestreamdental.co.uk.

^1298937600^3743^E-services help improve dental care^Carestream Dental understands that time spent on operational tasks is time lost to patients or growing your business. That’s why it ha…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/keyboard.png
Help for dentists affected by alcohol and drugs^

The Dentists Health Support Programme exists to assist dentists with alcohol and drug addiction
problems.

Anyone seeking help with these issues – whether for themselves or with concerns about a fellow dentists can contact a confidential helpline on 0207 487 3119.

Enquirers are put in contact with a local supporter in the appropriate geographical area, or with
the programme’s co-ordinator.

Local supporters are usually retired or semi-retired dentists who are trained and willing to make time to help colleagues.

The local supporter in turn contacts a special referee and help establish whether the dentist needs help. Special referees are dentists who have all recovered from alcohol/drug addiction and who have all received specialist training for this role.

The programme is funded by a trust which raises money from within the profession to finance
training and support for the special referees, who provide the help to dentists.

Local supporters are trained and re-trained from a central budget, although Local Dental Committees usually pay for associated travel costs. In addition, LDCs usually meet the travelling and subsistence costs of local supporters directly involved in casework.

For more details, please contact Michael Stern, the Dentists’ Health Support Trust Treasurer
at 48 Pollard Road, Whetstone, London, N20 OUD.

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Seven reasons to recommend MyOralHealth Pre-Brush Whitening mouthwash^

1. Maintains whitening after a professional whitening session and will gently and noticeably whiten teeth not professionally whitened.

2. Being antibacterial it will reduce plaque and help against gum conditions and bad breath.

3. Enhanced fluoride content will harden the enamel and help protect against cavities and acid erosion.

4. Patients will be motivated to better oral hygiene and their general dental health care.

5. Only supplied to and through dentists it can be dispensed by hygienists or reception staff with little if any input from the dentist.

6. With a cost price to the dentist as low as £4.20 Inc vat and an RRP of £7.00 it will be highly remunerative and could add tens of thousands to their income.

 7. Each bottle will be personalised to the dentist’s own art work and practice logo FREE. An ideal product for enhancing the practice’s image and attracting new patients

Each bottle contains 500ml. Motivated patients would use about 14 bottles a year at a cost of about £98 which equates to about 28 pence a day.

The dentist profits by £3.50 per bottle or £49.00 per year per patient. With just 500 patient users he would earn £24,500 each year, with a 1,000 patients it would be £49,000 – and that is without even lifting a probe.

In summary, the mouthwash will be supporting and enlarging the overall whitening market – without in any way threatening professional whitening treatments – and enhancing the value of these treatments as a result of the additional preventive dental benefits the patients receive.

As the austerity in the economic environment deepens, the mouthwash gives dentists the opportunity to maintain or enhance their income by offering their patients what is essentially a continuous programme of cosmetic care allied to active preventive care with the resultant overall better dental health.
 
To order or for further information contact MyOralHealth by calling 020 8236 2940 or visiting
www.whiteningmouthwash.co.uk or visit them at The Dentistry Show 2011 Stand H46, Birmingham NEC.

^1299024000^3747^Seven reasons to recommend MyOralHe…^1. Maintains whitening after a professional whitening session and will gently and noticeably whiten teeth not professionally whitened.2. Bei…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/IMAG0300.jpg
10 popular misconceptions about diabetes^

Misconception 1: Overeating sugar causes diabetes
So, how exactly does diabetes happen? The reasons are certainly not totally understood. What exactly is known is that simply overeating sugar isn’t likely to cause diabetes. Instead, diabetes begins when something disrupts your capacity to turn foods into energy.

To know what goes on when you’ve got diabetes, keep these things in your mind: Your system reduces most of foods into glucose, a sort of sugar required to power your cells. A hormone called insulin is created inside the pancreas. Insulin helps cells in your body use glucose for fuel.

Listed below are the most typical forms of diabetes and what researchers know about:
• Type 1 diabetes happens when the pancreas cannot make insulin
• Diabetes type 2 takes place when the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin, the insulin cannot work properly, or both
• Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy in certain women.

Misconception 2: You will find lots of rules inside a diabetes diet
For those who have diabetes, you simply must plan your diet. However, the general principal is easy: Following a ‘diabetes diet’ means choosing food that may work with your activities and any medications to help keep your glucose levels as near to normalcy as you can.

Misconception 3: Carbohydrates could be unhealthy for diabetes
Actually, carbohydrates are great for diabetes. They make up the foundation of a proper diabetes diet.

Carbohydrates possess the greatest impact on blood sugar, which explains why you are required to watch the amount of carbohydrates you take in when following a diabetes diet.

Misconception 4: Protein is superior to carbohydrates for diabetes
The major problem is the fact that many foods full of protein, for instance meat, are often filled up with fats. Overeating such fats increases your risk of heart problems. Inside a diabetes diet, protein should account for about 15% to 20% of the total calories you take in every day.
 
Misconception 5: You can adjust your diabetes drugs to ‘cove’ anything you eat
If you use insulin for your diabetes, you might learn to adjust the total amount and type you take to check the quantity of what you eat.

But this does not mean you can eat just as much as you would like, then just use more drugs to stabilise your blood sugar levels level.
 
Misconception 6: You will need to stop trying your preferred foods
There’s no reason to discontinue your preferred foods on the diabetes diet.
 
Misconception 7: You must quit desserts when you have diabetes

Far from the truth! You are able to develop many techniques for including desserts inside a diabetes diet. For example:
* Use low calorie sweeteners in desserts
* Reduce the quantity of dessert. For instance, as opposed to two scoops of frozen treats, have one. Or share a dessert with a friend
 
Misconception 8: Sugar substitutes are dangerous for those who have diabetes
Low-calorie sweeteners tend to be sweeter compared to equivalent volume of sugar, therefore it takes a reduced amount of them to have the same sweetness present in sugar. This will cause eating fewer calories than when you use sugar.
 
Misconception 9: You should eat special diabetic meals
The main difference from a diabetes diet along with your family’s ‘normal’ weight loss programme is this: When you have diabetes, you’ll want to monitor that which you eat a little more closely. This consists of the total of calories you eat and the amounts and varieties of carbohydrates, fats, and protein you consume.
 
Misconception 10: Diet foods are the most useful selections for diabetes
Just because a meal is defined as a ‘diet’ food does not necessarily mean it’s a better option for those who have diabetes. Actually, ‘diet’ foods could be expensive and no healthier than foods found in the ‘regular’ areas of the supermarket, or foods you prepare yourself.

 


Dorothy Kato blogs for the www.diabeticmenus.org blog site. It’s a personal hobby blog that shares ideas to help individuals to prevent/manage diabetes and help spread the consciousness on healthy eating.

 

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Oral health in Northern Ireland needs support, says BDA
^^1299024000^3746^Oral health in Northern Ireland nee…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/claudette-christie.jpg<br />
Belching dentist punished for breaking wind ^
<p>A belching dentist who broke wind regularly in front of patients and staff has been reprimanded by the General Dental Council (GDC).</p>
<p>
<p>Matthew Walton, a dentist in Shrewsbury in Shropshire, repeatedly broke wind in front of patients and work colleagues – an act the GDC committee ruled was unprofessional and inappropriate.</p>
<p>
<p>He also made V-signs behind the backs of patients, swore and was, generally, offensive.</p>
<p>
<p>The committee told Mr Walton that ‘Between August 2006 and December 2007 you were in practice as a dentist at the Green End Dental Practice and while in practice: <br />• Regularly belched and broke wind in front of patients and staff <br />• Regularly made rude gestures by sticking up two fingers behind the backs of patients and to practice staff <br />• Regularly swore in front of staff and patients <br />• Regularly made offensive remarks to patients in that you asked them to show you their money before providing treatment and/or asked patients to pay at reception before you would provide treatment to them<br /> • Regularly spoke and behaved in an abrupt and rude manner to patients<br /> • Made unacceptable and offensive remarks about patients to staff relating to patients.</p>
<p>
<p>The committee also heard how he was unco-operative and obstructive in his behaviour with dental nurses and listened to countless examples of specific occasions when Mr Walton was offensive to  patients.</p>
<p>
<p>The GDC is to consider his punishment at a later date.</p>
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A major help in identifying caries^
<p>With more than 30 years of experience in the UK dental market, Clark Dental is well-placed to provide dental care workers with a comprehensive range of affordable clinical equipment to assist them in their everyday practice. <br /> <br />With preventive and primary oral healthcare continuing to be an important focus, identifying caries before they turn into more serious problems is a major help to both practitioners and patients, especially nervous ones.<br /> <br />Now, Clark is able to offer dental care professionals an innovative means of identifying and keeping track of carious teeth at an early stage, thanks to the CarieScan PRO. <br /> <br />Simple to use and offering extremely accurate readings, the CarieScan PRO™ can detect early carious lesions not readily visible to the naked eye and before they can be detected on a radiograph, enabling early intervention and reducing the need for invasive treatments.  <br /> <br />Employing AC Impedance Spectroscopy (ACIST) to determine the changes in tooth mineral density, the CarieScan PRO™ is safer to use than x-rays, allowing for frequent monitoring.</p>
<p>
<p>In addition, the readings are unaffected by stain or toothdiscolouration, minimising the risk of false positive results.</p>
<p>
<p>Studies show CarieScan PRO to be 92.5% accurate at determining both carious and healthy teeth.<br /> <br />Patients will love its painfree methods, while practitioners will appreciate its straightforward, user-friendly operation and sterile disposable sensors.<br /> <br />Cut down on X-rays and increase nervous patient attendance with the CarieScan PRO – another practical dental solution from Clark Dental.<br /> <br />For more information on cutting-edge equipment solutions, please call Clark Dental on 01268 733 146 or email enquiries@clarkdental.co.uk.<br /> </p>
<p>^1299024000^3749^A major help in identifying caries^With more than 30 years of experience in the UK dental market, Clark Dental is well-placed to provide dental care workers with a comprehensi…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/rendering.jpg<br />
Considering the change from NHS to private practice?^
<p class=MsoNormal>If you are considering your options out of the NHS but are unsure about how to proceed, join Practice Plan and special guest, Chris Barrow, for a two-hour evening seminar dedicated to giving you practical and simple advice on how to make a seamless and successful transition.<br /> <br />Practice Plan has helped hundreds of NHS practices across the UK to successfully convert to private practice and we’ll have experts on hand to answer all your questions and support you in any way we can. <br /> <br />Each event is FREE, just choose the venue that’s right for you…<br /> <br />Monday 16 May             6.00pm  Maidstone<br />Thursday 26 May           6.00pm  Leeds<br />Tuesday 14 June            6.00pm  Newcastle<br /> <br />Before you make any decisions, Practice Plan can help you:<br />–       Carry a full risk analysis on your specific circumstances<br />–       Undertake a comprehensive financial review of your practice<br />–       Calculate the most appropriate hourly rate for private care<br />–       Devise a communications plan that’s right for your team and patients.<br /> <br />To reserve your FREE place, please call Emma on 01691 684171 or email emma.bateman@practiceplan.co.uk.<br /> <br />Visit <a href=http://www.practiceplan.co.uk/optionsoutofthenhs>www.practiceplan.co.uk/optionsoutofthenhs</a></p>
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<p><a href=http://www.practiceplan.co.uk/optionsoutofthenhs></a></p>
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<p>^1299024000^3748^Considering the change from NHS to …^If you are considering your options out of the NHS but are unsure about how to proceed, join Practice Plan and special guest, Chris Barrow, …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/CB-image.jpg<br />
Hypnosis in practice – not just for irrational fears^
<p>The March 2011 issue of <em>Preventive Dentistry</em> is out soon – and here’s a rundown of the key oral health news features, clinical studies and latest dental innovations for all dental professionals.</p>
<p>We put the finalists of Preventive Practice of the Year 2010 competition in the spotlight – the team at Confident Dental Care in Stroud, Gloucestershire – who have a preventive ethos second to none. The practice has researched and created its own Confident Steps to Health, a programme that’s evidence-based and patient friendly – and may be going places, too!</p>
<p>There are two hours worth of CPD articles – Shaun Howe talks perio, probes and probity in a CPD article sponsored by Philips and, in a Johnson & Johnson-sponsored CPD article, there’s a look at how changing practice can improve plaque control.</p>
<p>There’s another in the series of handy cut-out-and-keep How to… guides with a checklist to staying ethical and new columnist, Bal Chana, president of the British Association of Dental Therapists, offers her view on the GDC’s Scope of Practice.</p>
<p>The British Society of Dental Hygiene & Therapy’s president, Sally Simpson, joins regular columnists Pam Swain and Jan Baxendale and guest columnist dentist, Peter Galgut.</p>
<p>James Goolnik talks social networking, Ann Gilbert considers patient-specific risk assessment and we look at a toothpaste revolution while there’s a look at an amazing solution to relieve the pressures of accurate perio charting.<img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Pg-01-prev.jpg alt=

Plus, the rise and rise of children’s eating disorders and what the dental team can do to help, and two clinical hypnotherapists consider how best to use hypnosis in the practice.

And you can now subscribe to Preventive Dentistry magazine at the exceptional low price of £39! (was £59, SAVE 35%)

• One year’s subscription (print) which is six issues costs £39

• Three years’ subscription (print) which is 18 issues costs £78.

Call the Preventive Dentistry team on 01923 851771 or email [email protected]

 

^1299024000^3750^Hypnosis in practice – not just f…^The March 2011 issue of Preventive Dentistry is out soon – and here’s a rundown of the key oral health news features, clinical studies…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/marchprev.jpg
Hypnodontics for the whole dental team^

The Institute of Hypnotherapy for Medical and Dental Practice is staging two courses specifically for dentists and the dental team.

They will be taught by Dr John Butler who has more than 20 years experience and who founded the IHMDP.

Hypnodontics Foundation Course (1 Day)
This course can be taken by dentists and staff working in contact with patients in a dental practice.

It covers skills in using hypnosis both formally and informally in interactions with patients to alleviate anxiety and experience of pain and facilitate giving treatment to anxious patients, both adults and children.

The course includes the following main topics:
– Alleviate dental anxiety and phobia in patients
– Ease pain and discomfort in patients
– Improve patient compliance for dental procedures
– Boost attendance for check-ups and cleaning
– Reduce/ eliminate needle phobia
– Increase patient satisfaction
– Improve staff well-being due to increased cooperation of patients

Each course is limited to 40 available seats. This enables our trainers to deliver the highest service and training to dental staff. Therefore early booking is encouraged to avoid disappointment.

Date: 4 October 2011
Venue: Central London
Cost: £150

Advanced Hypnodontics Course (1 Day)
Graduates of the foundation course or with previous hypnodontics training are eligible to attend the advanced course to increase their skills in dental hypnosis.

The course includes the following main topics
– Hypnoanalgesia for anaesthetic averse patients
– Reduction/elimination of pain and discomfort during and after dental
procedures
– Improvement of haemostasis during dental procedures
– Hypnosis for dental patients with severe dental anxiety and phobia
– Stress management for dental personnel
– Hypnosis to reduce/ eliminate gagging
– Hypnosis for bruxism

Date: 5 October 2011
Venue: Central London
Cost: £150

There is a discount for booking both courses.

Book your seat today
To book your course please fill in the online registration form here, phone 0207 385 1166 or send an email to [email protected], stating your name and telephone number and a team member will contact you as soon as possible.

^1299024000^3751^Hypnodontics for the whole dental t…^The Institute of Hypnotherapy for Medical and Dental Practice is staging two courses specifically for dentists and the dental team.They will…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/fear.jpg
M.O.T your smile^

We all know how essential it is to give our cars their annual M.O.Ts – but now it’s time to give that all important treatment to your smile!

Everyday maintenance of our teeth and gums is really important, but by giving yourself a ‘Smile M.O.T’ you can boost your self esteem, improve your overall health and protect your pocket!

To explain how, Denplan’s chief dental officer, Roger Matthews, can help you get started.

COSMETIC HEALTH
Our smiles can often make the biggest first impression, but recent research has found that around 45% of you are unhappy with the appearance of your teeth[1]. People are now far more conscious of their smile and with makeover shows and magazines revealing the secrets of the ‘celebrity smile’ you may be considering some treatment for yourself.

Cosmetic treatments range from simple tooth whitening, to more complex and invasive procedures such as dental veneers. While cosmetic treatments can really make a world of difference to your smile, it’s the little things that can make a big difference. Flossing and brushing regularly is essential to maintain good dental health, but the key is to invest in a great dental hygiene routine. You should also try to steer clear of staining vices like cigarettes, coffee and wine. It’s worth bearing in mind that anything that will stain a white shirt can also stain your teeth!

DENTAL HEALTH
Toothache and other dental problems can make even simple things like eating, sleeping and working a nightmare, but what you may not realise is that poor dental health can lead to long-term general health problems including heart and lung disease. In fact, there’s even a link between gum disease and infertility in men and low birth-weight babies in pregnant women[2] . Many of these have early-warning signs in your mouth which can be spotted by your dentist, so the earlier the signs can be detected, the better.

Denplan arranges dental payment plans that are designed to encourage you to see your dentist regularly and benefit from a preventive approach, which could help you avoid more serious problems in the future.

FINANCIAL HEALTH
A ‘Smile M.O.T’ is not just about focusing on your dental health – it’s also about protecting your pocket. Fear of unexpected bills can really put people off going to the dentist. In fact, recent research has shown that more than four in 10 of us say we can’t afford to go [3]! Having a dental payment plan can help you guard against unexpected dental bills and make budgeting far easier. Dental payment plans are different from other health cash plans – put simply, cash plans will usually only offer a contribution, which is a small amount towards average dental costs in the UK.


References

[1] YouGov survey on behalf of the British Orthodontic Society (BOS) – March 2010

[2] National Dental Survey on behalf of the British Dental Health Foundation (BDHF) – May 2009

[3] YouGov survey on behalf of Denplan Ltd – October 2010

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European dental care systems investigated^^1299110400^3753^European dental care systems invest…^^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/decare-euro-meeting.jpg
Spring clean your teeth to avoid gum disease^

Spring cleaning is not just for houses – it is also a great ethos to adopt when it comes to avoiding gum disease, advise dental health experts.

Traditionally, spring cleaning has meant thoroughly clearing your house of dust and cobwebs in preparation for the months ahead.

And more recently it has become a metaphor for decluttering and reorganising everything to make our lives run more smoothly. 

So spring is a great time to tackle the hidden oral hygiene problems that could be undermining your body’s overall health, advise the experts from toothpaste and mouthwash manufacturers Eludril and Elgydium.

Consistently good oral health is vitally important because it can be an early warning sign of health problems elsewhere in the body.

‘Many health conditions have been linked to gum disease,’ advise the experts Eludril and Elgydium.

‘For example, those with gum disease are almost twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease as those without gum disease.

‘People with diabetes seem to suffer more from gum disease and this makes it very difficult for them to control their blood sugar levels.

‘Pregnant women with gum disease may be seven times more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small.

‘And a link has even been suggested between the incidence of gum disease and breast cancer.’

Eludril and Elgydium experts recommend the following approach to spring cleaning our mouths:

* Brush your teeth at least twice a day for around two minutes. It is too easy to overlook this when you are tired and it is late. If you are at home for the evening, get ready for bed before you start feeling tired. That way, you brush your teeth and floss when you are more alert and it is less of a chore. Just don’t eat or drink anything afterwards

* Floss every day, as this reaches areas that a toothbrush might miss. Get into the habit, it does not take long at all

* Visit your dentist or hygienist on a regular basis, as this will ensure that signs of gum disease are spotted and treated as soon as possible. Not been to your dentist/hygienist for a while? Pick up the phone and make that all important appointment

* Replace your toothbrush regularly (every three or four months or as soon as the bristles look worn). Add this to your next shopping list or buy it online

* Avoid starchy, sugary foods and drinks as these make the problem worse. Think about what you eat and its effect on your health

* Eat plenty of fresh foods and vegetables and avoid snacking between meals. If you are hungry between meals, snack on something healthy like fresh fruit, particularly apples or raw vegetables such as carrots. Not only are they good for you but the action of chewing will stimulate saliva flow which reduces the build-up of bacteria.

They add: ‘Should you be aware of the early signs of gum disease, visit your dentist as soon as possible, as the condition is easily and effectively treated if caught early and need not result in any long-term health issues.’

These are the gum disease symptoms you should be looking out for: 

• Sore gums or swollen gums are often early indicators of gum disease (often known as gingivitis)
• Bleeding gums, it is not usual for gums to bleed so if they do there is something wrong
• Receding gums, a sign that gum disease has been left untreated for some time. 

If you have receding gums, the root of your tooth will be exposed and this will often result in local sensitivity and pain.

As this condition worsens, a receding gum line will de-stabilise your teeth and they will gradually loosen, move and ultimately either fall out or have to be extracted.

Quick, easy and effective treatments are available for those who have detected the early signs of gum disease.

Experts from Eludril and Elgydium recommend that you check with your dentist for advice on which gingivitis treatment is right for you.

‘The gold standard treatment for gum disease for many years has been chlorhexidine which has been proven effective against the key organisms that cause gum disease. It works by inhibiting the build-up of dental plaque.’

Eludril mouthwash – which contains chlorhexidine – is an antibacterial and analgesic solution used to prevent and treat gum disease.

Choosing the right toothpaste is just as important. The Elgydium toothpaste range includes a regular anti-plaque paste, containing chlorhexidine, to help prevent dental plaque and tartar build-up.

There are also whitening, sensitive and decay protection toothpastes – but unlike many whitening toothpastes, the whitening agent in Elgydium Whitening (Sodium Bicarbonate) is micropulverised to reduce harmful abrasion of the teeth. 

Elgydium Sensitive contains a unique new-generation Fluoride called Fluorinol clinically proven to reinforce teeth against decay by binding to the enamel five times more effectively than ordinary fluoride. 

Elgydium Decay Protection also contains Fluorinol, as well as a special agent called Siliglycol that keeps more fluoride on teeth ­– even after rinsing ­– to give day-long protection against decay.

For further information about protecting teeth against gum disease, visit www.gumproblems.co.uk.

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Sex assault dentist erased despite testimonials^

A married dentist who was jailed after a judge found him guilty of sexual assault has been struck off the dentists’ register.

In September 2010, Roger Klein, a 42-year-old married father, was ordered to spend 15 months in prison (later reduced to 12 months following an appeal) and sign the sex offender’s register for 10 years by Judge Martin Rudland.

He was accused of sexual assault by a female patient, who claimed he had pinned her down and tried to touch her inappropriately.

The General Dental Council (GDC) committee said at a hearing in February that:’Mr Hockton, on your behalf, submitted that whilst your conduct was serious, it would be disproportionate for the Committee to erase your name from the dental register.

‘He stated that this was an isolated incident and there is no risk of harm to patients or the public. He drew the Committee’s attention to the need not to lose the services of an excellent dentist.

‘Mr Hockton referred to the devastating personal and financial consequences of this conviction on you and handed in a letter from you which the Committee has read. He put before the Committee a bundle of testimonials from patients and professional colleagues.

‘Five patients gave evidence and spoke highly of you and of their regard for your clinical abilities and personal qualities. All would be willing to continue as your patients.’

But added: ‘The Committee, having listened to the representations from both sides, has decided that, it is in the public interest and consistent with the decision already taken on sanction, that the suspension should take immediate effect. This is necessary to maintain public confidence in the profession.’

Mr Klein was manager of the Regent Cosmetic Dental Practice in Knutsford, Cheshire.

^1299110400^3756^Sex assault dentist erased despite …^A married dentist who was jailed after a judge found him guilty of sexual assault has been struck off the dentists’ register.In Septem…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/gavel2009.png
Day in the life of Portsmouth Dental Academy^

There is definitely such a thing as a typical day in so much as I can be sure that it will start early and finish late. I left at 6.30am this morning and, as I live on the Isle of Wight, my day starts each morning with a ferry ride across the Solent, an experience that can vary according to the weather.

My first meeting at 8.30am was the daily discussion with all the staff about the order of the day. This morning, I had one-to-one meetings with three members of staff and an impromptu meeting with a student – they know I will always make time to see them.

Between meetings, I caught up with some emails and, in the afternoon, I observed our clinical examination programme. Tonight, I’m representing the university at a school governors meeting back on the Isle of Wight and I hope to be home by 9.00pm.

Having been the head of School of Professionals Complementary to Dentistry SPCD since it opened, I took on the director’s role in January 2010. The Dental Academy is a brand new, purpose-designed facility to train final-year undergraduate dentists alongside dental care professionals. It developed out of the work we did to prepare a bid for a dental school in 2007.

We were disappointed when the bid was ultimately unsuccessful but, with the determination of a hugely creative and resourceful team and support from our partners at King’s College London Dental Institute, the Dental Academy was born.

We’re proud that it’s the first of its kind in the country and it’s generated a lot of excitement. One of the first things we did was to invite the local dental community to come in to see the facilities that resulted in significant professional interest. We’ve had significant local media coverage and have already attracted a good supply of patients.

At any one time, we have more than 100 students studying with us, which makes it a lively place to work.

Our courses are designed to lead directly to employment opportunities in a variety of settings, including independent general practice, corporate dental practice, specialist periodontal practice, the NHS and in hospitals and health promotion services.

I have lots of interaction with students. I get to see the students on a regular basis and teach a number of subjects across the programmes. It’s a friendly and open environment and I see students all the time around the building. I’m always bumping into them in the corridor that links the original building to the new extension, nicknamed ‘the mouthwash corridor’ because of its pink glass panels.

It’s a good way of saying ‘hi’ and catching up with them informally. We capture and respond to student feedback at weekly practice team meetings, through the formal teaching evaluation process and through the student/staff committee process and I meet regularly with all of the course representatives.

We receive patient feedback via a survey twice a year and by actively encouraging comments and feedback in a book held at reception, all of which helps us to reflect and improve upon what we do.

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<p>The new purpose-built facility has given us the space to realise our approach to training dental and DCP students together in teams – just as they would work together in practice.</p>
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<p>A dental student, acting as the team leader, refers patients to dental hygiene/therapy students within one of the four practices and they all learn from each other.</p>
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<p>A practice meeting is held every Friday for students and staff to come together to review their patients and individual cases, etc. Our facility has nearly doubled in size, so we’ve recruited a number of additional clinical supervisors and tutors, dental nursing, administrative and technical staff. We have an excellent team of some 60 staff.</p>
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<p>Societal values are very much at the heart of study here. We target the ‘hard to reach’ communities and our community-based activities include taking a dental bus out to schools and even providing treatment for children visiting from Chernobyl.</p>
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<p>We teach our students to see their roles as health promoters and to work very much in partnership with the patients who use the services, encouraging them to take responsibility for their oral health.</p>
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<p>We want to learn more about the needs of local people. For example, we’re currently undertaking survey work and initially targeting young males and school-aged children.</p>
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<p>My email inbox gets very full, very quickly and I try to keep up with email traffic when I’m on the move. I inevitably start many emails with an apology for the length of time it has taken me to come back with a reply. Amy Fullick is the school administrator and looks after me and the clinical directors. She is very talented and highly organised – she makes my day-to-day working life manageable and she is absolutely invaluable.</p>
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<p>Evening meetings and events are a normal part of the role. For example, this week I have evening commitments on four out of five nights, including an overnight trip to the University of Kent where I’m an external examiner.</p>
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<p>I think you have to be organised in this kind of job. I like to be methodical and I’m a great list person and have two whiteboards in my office covered with things to do. When I need to order a third, I’ll know I’m in trouble!</p>
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<p>To relax, I do two aerobics and dance classes a week as I find it’s a great way of relieving stress. I love reading and I’m known as ‘bookworm’ to my family and friends. However, nothing beats a hot bath, candles and a glass of wine.</p>
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<p>The University of Portsmouth Dental Academy offers four main programmes<br />1. BSc (Hons) in Hygiene and Dental Therapy – three-year, full-time programme accepting <br />24 students each year<br />2. Certificate of Higher Education in Dental Nursing – 18-month, full-time programme accepting 20 students each year. <br />3. Foundation Award in Science and Dental Therapy – six-month, part-time programme for registered dental nurses who do not have the academic entry requirements to go straight onto the Hygiene Therapy degree. This programme recruits eight students each year.<br />4. The dental undergraduate primary care programme – 80 final (fifth year) dental students from KCLDI join the DCP students each year.  Each student is with the Dental Academy <br />for a 10-week placement (1:4 rotation)</p>
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<p>Sara Holmes was appointed to the University of Portsmouth in 1998. She was one of the main drivers behind the development of the School of Professionals Complementary to Dentistry (SPCD) that opened in 2004, and its recent metamorphosis into the University of Portsmouth Dental Academy. Sara has presented and published widely on the enhancement of dental education and recently undertook her Professional Doctorate Viva. She began her career as a dental nurse and has worked in primary and secondary care settings. She received an MBE for services to dental education in 2006.</p>
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<p>^1299110400^3757^Day in the life of Portsmouth Denta…^There is definitely such a thing as a typical day in so much as I can be sure that it will start early and finish late. I left at 6.30am thi…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/SaraHolmes.jpg<br />
X-Factor’s Aiden ‘not a fan of the dentist’^
<p><em>X-Factor</em> star Aiden Grimshaw has admitted he’s ‘not the biggest fan of the dentist’.</p>
<p>The 19 year old said on Twitter: ‘Had to go to the dentist today! Not the biggest fan of the dentist me!’</p>
<p>The <em>X-Factor</em> finalist recently appeared on the cover the of most recent issue of the <em>Gay Times</em> in which he shows off a toned body as he poses with his shirt off.</p>
<p>Discussing his trademark style, he told the magazine: ‘Although the hair is on my head, the quiff was an accident.</p>
<p>‘Merely a brushing of the hair. It was just me being lazy. But it stuck…’</p>
<p>The intense singer, much missed by fans, is currently on the <em>X-Factor</em> tour and has been reported as saying he’d love to duet with <em>X-Factor</em> finalist – and friend – Matt Cardle.</p>
<p>^1299196800^3758^X-Factor’s Aiden ‘not a fan of the …^X-Factor star Aiden Grimshaw has admitted he’s ‘not the biggest fan of the dentist’.The 19 year old said on Twitter: ‘Had to go to the denti…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/aiden.jpg<br />
Dental hygienists’ board game aids study ^
<p>Two dental hygienists have come up with the perfect solution to the tedious, studying slog dental hygiene students face leading up to the all-important board exams – turn it into a game.<br /> <br />Pass It! incorporates more than 1,000 important dental hygiene questions in a fun board game that will prepare any dental hygiene student for the board exams without the boredom, study fatigue or information overload usually associated with the intense exam studying.<br /> <br />US dental hygienists, Karen Isbister and Carrie Clotworthy, created the game during their studies for the board exam and have subsequently decided to release their secret studying aid to dental hygiene students across the country.<br /> <br />Pass It! does what textbooks and study notes can’t do — it keeps students engaged, competitive and focused.</p>
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<p>Karen Isbister says: ‘Dental hygiene students will be astounded by how much they learn and how painless the process can be. And with our carefully selected, targeted questions, students can be assured that when they play Pass It! they will be prepared for the dental hygiene board exams.’<br /> <br />Pass It! can be played in groups from two to four players.</p>
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<p>The information on the question cards are all culled from textbooks, board exam material and hygienists’ personal experience, and represent the most relevant information for board exam test-takers.</p>
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<p>Certain questions pertain to specific board exam ‘requirements’ like X-rays and dental materials, and none of the questions are multiple choice.</p>
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<p>Contestants move their game piece around the board as they answer correctly to questions. Wildcard spots like the ‘Tooth Fairy’ and the ‘Cavity Creep’ keep the game entertaining.<br /> <br />The game works well for auditory learners, as questions are read aloud, and visual learners, as questions are read by contestants on a rotating basis.<br /> <br />Pass It! has been reviewed by the directors of dental hygiene schools across the States to very positive feedback and Karen and Carrie will be displaying and selling the games at dental hygiene conferences.<br /> <br />Given the importance of passing the board exams – students can wait months before re-testing after a failed exam – the board game can mean the difference between passing the exam and becoming a dental hygienist, or wasting months re-studying for a second chance at the exam.<br /> <br />And considering the price of textbooks, the $119 price tag for the game — which can be split between four contestants — is affordable even for students.<br /> <br />The game can also be used by experienced dental hygienists looking to brush up on details they might have forgotten.<br /> <br />For more information on Pass It!, or to order the board game, visit <a href=http://www.passitgame.com>www.passitgame.com</a>.</p>
<p>^1299196800^3759^Dental hygienists’ board game aids …^Two dental hygienists have come up with the perfect solution to the tedious, studying slog dental hygiene students face leading up to the al…^<br />
Philips launches world first at BDA^
<p>BDA delegates will be able to witness the unveiling of a world innovation in oral health at the Dental Conference in May.</p>
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<p>In a profession where the word ‘new’ is often used but rarely lives up to the billing, this is literally a world first, possibly on the scale of the introduction of sonic technology for tooth cleaning.</p>
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<p>The new product is not a toothbrush, but it is an innovation from Philips’ immediate field of competence in oral healthcare and bio-film management of dental plaque.</p>
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<p>If that were not tantalising enough, Philips will also be announcing ground-breaking developments to the Sonicare sonic toothbrush range which will take brushing upscale to an altogether more sophisticated level.</p>
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<p>As well as launching not one but two new Sonicare products at the BDA, Philips, is also presenting the full suite of current Sonicare toothbrushes, each of which has different specialist features.</p>
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<p>At the core they are all based on pioneering sonic technology, however Philips recognises that people have varied oral health needs and are at different life stages, so has developed specific Sonicare toothbrushes to target different requirements.</p>
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<p>For users who want to achieve an advanced level of oral health there’s the FlexCare+ with five different brushing modes; for those who are motivated by whiter teeth there’s the HealthyWhite; for those wanting an introduction to sonic cleaning and want to transition from manual brushing there’s the HydroClean and for children there’s the Sonicare For Kids brush to set up good cleaning habits for life.</p>
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<p>With so many options to choose from, it is little wonder that over 17 million people have switched to Sonicare.</p>
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<p>Philips is located on stand C16 at the BDA Conference.</p>
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<p>For more information, visit <a href=http://www.sonicare.co.uk/dp>www.sonicare.co.uk/dp</a>.</p>
<p>^1299196800^3760^Philips launches world first at BDA^BDA delegates will be able to witness the unveiling of a world innovation in oral health at the Dental Conference in May.In a profession whe…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/top-secret.jpg<br />
Brace yourself for a perfect aesthetic match^
<p>An orthodontics practice is joining forces with a facial aesthetics expert to provide patients with a complete set of treatment options.</p>
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<p>Lincoln Orthodontics is expanding the range of services it offers to patients looking for that perfect smile after teaming up with Dr Guinevere Smith from Facial Perfection.</p>
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<p>Guin, who is a qualified dentist and expert in facial aesthetics, will be holding a clinic at Lincoln Orthodontics on the third Wednesday of every month offering non-surgical treatments, including line softening and dermal fillers.</p>
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<p>She’ll also be on hand to speak to visitors to Lincoln Orthodontics’ Open Day on Saturday 2 April.</p>
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<p>Since qualifying from the University of Sheffield’s School of Clinical Dentistry in 2005 Guin has studied advanced techniques in Botulinum toxin (Botox) and fillers (Restylane). <br />She is able to provide expert advice and a comprehensive treatment plan for anti-aging and facial skin care.</p>
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<p>Specialist orthodontist and owner of Lincoln Orthodontics, Dr Matthew Clare, said the services Facial Perfection offers complement those already on offer at the Deacon Road practice.</p>
<p>
<p>‘In the past people had to put up with the smile they were born with but thanks to advances in technology that is no longer the case,’ explained Matthew. ‘We transform patients’ smile by guiding their existing teeth from their original position into an ideal one using invisible, removable and fixed braces.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Attitudes towards appearance have changed, with cosmetic dentistry and non-surgical facial treatments becoming increasingly popular.  We’ve helped over 1,700 adults improve their smile in the last five years and in a recent MORI poll of adults in England and Wales aged 15 and over 48% said they would like their smile improved.</p>
<p>
<p>‘People used to think they had to make do with their appearance, particularly when it came to their teeth, but when they realise they can do something about their smile it’s hugely empowering.</p>
<p>
<p>‘When a patient’s treatment is complete it can be life-changing: their confidence levels visibly soar and it even changes how they react with other people.’</p>
<p>
<p>Guin added: ‘I’m delighted to be working with Matthew and his team of specialist orthodontists who are dedicated to helping people achieve the smile they’ve always wanted.<br />‘In some cases however this may require additional treatments such as teeth whitening, rejuvenating the skin around the patient’s mouth or enhancing their lips to improve their facial profile.</p>
<p>
<p>‘More and more people are realising that just because they’ve reached a certain age it doesn’t mean they are past their sell-by date. We all want to look the best we possibly can whatever our age and often it’s just a case of giving nature a helping hand!</p>
<p>
<p>‘We can make small changes which have a dramatic impact on how people look and feel without the need for more invasive surgery.’</p>
<p>
<p>To book a free consultation with Guin at the Lincoln Orthodontics Open Day on Saturday 2 April from 10am-4pm, call 01522 533363.</p>
<p>^1299456000^3763^Brace yourself for a perfect aesthe…^An orthodontics practice is joining forces with a facial aesthetics expert to provide patients with a complete set of treatment options.Linc…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/ortho-copy.jpg<br />
After CQC, comes CPC…^
<p>Practice principals should take note: compulsory pension contributions (CPC) are officially back on the cards, with the roll-out of this new scheme beginning next year.</p>
<p>
<p>By the end of the enrolment period (2014), employers – including practice principals – can expect to be paying a 3% contribution annually towards employee pensions.<br /> <br />On top of the many additional running costs that the private sector has had to absorb in recent years, including VAT increases and the hidden price of making practices Care Quality Commission-ready, CPC will come as something of a blow to employers, including dental businesses, who do not already have a pension scheme in place for workers.<br /> <br />Although small businesses (50 employees or fewer) such as dental practices will not be directly affected until August 2014, principals may wish to start planning ahead in order to minimise any impact on their long-term budget so that patients and services remain unaffected.<br /> <br />Rather than simply go along with the scheme as it stands to avoid appearing uncaring to staff, practice principals do have some viable alternatives to consider which could prove to be less painful financially but still benefit employees. <br /> <br />It is a little known fact that CPC compliance can actually be achieved by instituting a salary sacrifice pension plan. Asking staff to take a small cut in salary, the balance of which goes towards their pension pot, not only results in lower income tax for staff (because their overall taxable income will be less) but could also reduce National Insurance contributions for both employer and employee by 13.8%, savings that could be added to the worker’s pension pot. In the long term, this could mean that final pensions could be increased by up to 31% larger – and all this, without costing the employer a penny! <br /> <br />Salary sacrifice pensions can create a win-win scenario for both employer and employee and will certainly save GDPs a lot of money, all of which can then be reinvested back into the company, ultimately benefiting patients – that of corporation tax, the sums soon start to add up in your favour.<br /> <br />For more information please visit <a href=http://www.lansdellrose.co.uk>www.lansdellrose.co.uk</a> or call Lansdell & Rose on 020 7376 9333.</p>
<p>^1299456000^3761^After CQC, comes CPC…^Practice principals should take note: compulsory pension contributions (CPC) are officially back on the cards, with the roll-out of this new…^<br />
Get the smile factor like Cheryl Cole!^
<p>The Smile Factor is the theme for this year’s National Smile Month (15 May-15 June).</p>
<p>The aim of the campaign is to put the smile back on peoples’ faces and help them display their full personalities through the Smile Factor theme.</p>
<p>
<p>Now into its 35th year, National Smile Month remains an integral part of the Foundation’s work in promoting greater oral health.</p>
<p>
<p>As in previous years, the Foundation will also be raising the awareness of a healthy diet and the link between good oral health and good overall body health and promoting the three key messages of brush for two minutes twice a day using a fluoride toothpaste, visit your dentist regularly, as often as they recommend and cut down on how often you have sugary foods and drinks.</p>
<p>Chief executive of organisers, the British Dental Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter, described the thinking behind this year’s campaign.</p>
<p>Dr Carter said: ‘A smile can be a very powerful show of emotion, yet not everyone has the confidence to do so.</p>
<p>
<p>‘They say you can hide behind a smile if you are not happy or are self-conscious about your teeth, so many people are missing out on showing their very own ‘Smile Factor’.</p>
<p>
<p>Others are being held back by poor oral wellbeing and its impact on their general health. This year’s campaign is designed to challenge those perceptions and get you smiling again.’</p>
<p>Every year, the Foundation encourages local communities, practices and individuals up and down the country to take part and get involved in National Smile Month and, as ever, there will be a wide range of different ways in which people can do just that. There will be many family and community events throughout the campaign – all of which need your support.</p>
<p>If you’d like to find out more about National Smile Month, wish to take part in an event or organise one, all campaign material is now available.</p>
<p>
<p>Please call the Foundation’s PR Department on 01788 539792 to request a copy.</p>
<p>^1299456000^3762^Get the smile factor like Cheryl Co…^The Smile Factor is the theme for this year’s National Smile Month (15 May-15 June).The aim of the campaign is to put the smile back o…^<br />
Open wide to fluoride!^
<p>Ever wondered why the dental team raves about this word? Here, a bit of information for you to ‘take in’ as to why this is…</p>
<p>
<p><strong>WHAT IS FLUORIDE?</strong><br />Fluoride is a naturally occurring element fluorine. It is an essential component of body fluids and soft tissues. Most fluoride in the body is deposited in bones and teeth.</p>
<p>
<p>Calcium fluoride is the form found naturally in water supplies. Sodium fluoride is the form added to artificially raise levels in drinking water. Fluoride is found naturally in water, soil, rocks, air and many plants.</p>
<p>
<p>It is found in some foods, too! Fish bones, tea and beer and salt and it is routinely added to toothpaste and mouthwash and drinking water in some areas.</p>
<p>
<p>Sometimes, a dentist will use topical gels and filling materials that contain fluoride to help strengthen teeth.</p>
<p>
<p><strong>WHY IS FLUORIDE GOOD FOR TEETH? </strong><br />Teeth are composed largely of the mineral compounds CALCIUM and PHOSPHATE.</p>
<p>
<p>Research over the past 60 years has shown that fluoride produces an effect in a number of different ways which combine to slow and help prevent the decay process and also reverse decay in its early stages.</p>
<p>
<p><strong>HOW DOES IT WORK? </strong><br />The transparent sticky layer that forms on the teeth daily is called plaque – It is made up of bacteria and debris.</p>
<p>
<p>When sugar is put in the mouth the bacteria feed on the sugar and cause acid – this is called an acid attack and causes demneralisation which is the start of the decay process.</p>
<p>
<p>Fluoride can reverse the decay process in its early stages by remineralisation of the enamel with new mineral crystals.</p>
<p>
<p>Fluoride toothpaste and mouthwashes evoke this mechanism.</p>
<p>
<p>When fluoride enters developing teeth from the diet via the bloodstream from fluoride ingested the mineral crystals are incorporated and theoretically the teeth are more resistant to acid attack.</p>
<p>
<p>The parts of teeth that are most susceptible to decay are the natural grooves, pits and fissures on the biting surfaces.</p>
<p>
<p>Fluoride entering the teeth at the developing stages can reduce the depth of these.</p>
<p>
<p>So, now you know!</p>
<p>
<p>I hope you ‘absorbed’ some of the information and if a question comes up in the pub quiz – you can be the nerd with the knowledge!</p>
<p>

<p>
<hr />
<p>Caroline Lunch is a dental nurse at Perfect 32 dental practice in Beverley, East Yorkshire. Visit <a href=http://www.perfect32.com>www.perfect32.com</a>.</p>
<p>^1299456000^3764^Open wide to fluoride!^Ever wondered why the dental team raves about this word? Here, a bit of information for you to ‘take in’ as to why this is…WHA…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Nicka’s-pics-096.jpg<br />
Dental charges: up in England, frozen in Wales^
<p>The government has confirmed that dental charges will increase, just days after it was revealed that dental charges will be frozen in Wales.</p>
<p>
<p>From 1 April the increases will be:</p>
<p>
<p>• The dental charge payable for a band 1 course of treatment will increase by 50p from £16.50 to £17<br />• The dental charge for a band 2 course of treatment will increase by £1.40 from £45.60 to £47<br />• The charge for a band 3 course of treatment will increase by £6 from £198 to £204.</p>
<p>
<p>Meanwhile, Welsh dental patients will continue paying same level of charges as the Welsh Assembly government has decided to freeze them for the fifth consecutive year, the Welsh health minister Edwina Hart has announced.</p>
<p>
<p>‘By freezing dental charges in Wales for the fifth year running, we are maintaining access to NHS dentistry for the people of Wales, ensuring charges remain affordable and in doing so helping to tackle oral health inequalities,’ said Ms Hart as she announced the decision.</p>
<p>
<p>In England, the Department of Health defended the charges, which make the government £450million a year.</p>
<p>
<p>A spokesman said: ‘This is valuable income that helps the NHS to ­maintain vital services for patients.’</p>
<p>^1299456000^3765^Dental charges: up in England, froz…^The government has confirmed that dental charges will increase, just days after it was revealed that dental charges will be frozen in Wales….^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/price.jpg<br />
Brace yourself for a perfect aesthetic match^
<p>An orthodontics practice is joining forces with a facial aesthetics expert to provide patients with a complete set of treatment options.</p>
<p>Lincoln Orthodontics is expanding the range of services it offers to patients looking for that perfect smile after teaming up with Dr Guinevere Smith from Facial Perfection.</p>
<p>Guin, who is a qualified dentist and expert in facial aesthetics, will be holding a clinic at Lincoln Orthodontics on the third Wednesday of every month offering non-surgical treatments, including line softening and dermal fillers.</p>
<p>She’ll also be on hand to speak to visitors to Lincoln Orthodontics’ Open Day on Saturday 2 April.</p>
<p>Since qualifying from the University of Sheffield’s School of Clinical Dentistry in 2005 Guin has studied advanced techniques in Botulinum toxin (Botox) and fillers (Restylane). <br />She is able to provide expert advice and a comprehensive treatment plan for anti-aging and facial skin care.</p>
<p>Specialist orthodontist and owner of Lincoln Orthodontics, Dr Matthew Clare, said the services Facial Perfection offers complement those already on offer at the Deacon Road practice.</p>
<p>‘In the past people had to put up with the smile they were born with but thanks to advances in technology that is no longer the case,’ explained Matthew. ‘We transform patients’ smile by guiding their existing teeth from their original position into an ideal one using invisible, removable and fixed braces.</p>
<p>‘Attitudes towards appearance have changed, with cosmetic dentistry and non-surgical facial treatments becoming increasingly popular.  We’ve helped over 1,700 adults improve their smile in the last five years and in a recent MORI poll of adults in England and Wales aged 15 and over 48% said they would like their smile improved.</p>
<p>‘People used to think they had to make do with their appearance, particularly when it came to their teeth, but when they realise they can do something about their smile it’s hugely empowering.</p>
<p>‘When a patient’s treatment is complete it can be life-changing: their confidence levels visibly soar and it even changes how they react with other people.’</p>
<p>Guin added: ‘I’m delighted to be working with Matthew and his team of specialist orthodontists who are dedicated to helping people achieve the smile they’ve always wanted.</p>
<p>
<p>‘In some cases however this may require additional treatments such as teeth whitening, rejuvenating the skin around the patient’s mouth or enhancing their lips to improve their facial profile.</p>
<p>‘More and more people are realising that just because they’ve reached a certain age it doesn’t mean they are past their sell-by date. We all want to look the best we possibly can whatever our age and often it’s just a case of giving nature a helping hand!</p>
<p>‘We can make small changes which have a dramatic impact on how people look and feel without the need for more invasive surgery.’</p>
<p>^1299456000^3766^Brace yourself for a perfect aesthe…^An orthodontics practice is joining forces with a facial aesthetics expert to provide patients with a complete set of treatment options.Linc…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/ortho-copy.jpg<br />
North of England gets innovative dental showroom^
<p>Henry Schein Minerva recently celebrated the opening of its new showroom and training centre in Leeds which was attended by some of the North of England’s leading dental professionals.</p>
<p>
<p>The showroom is situated immediately off Junction 27 of the M62 and has been extensively equipped with a full surgery set-up, three further individual treatment centres, featuring Sirona, KaVo, and Belmont as well as a dedicated dental innovations area featuring the very latest 2D and 3D digital X-ray equipment.</p>
<p>
<p>The facility also houses a lecture room for 30-plus delegates which will be used for some of Henry Schein Minerva’s education courses and is available for the local dental community to use as a resource.</p>
<p>
<p>Simon Gambold, managing director of Henry Schein Minerva UK, was delighted to welcome local practitioners to the Centre for the opening.</p>
<p>
<p>He said: ‘I am so pleased that we have been able to invest in this training and showroom facility that provides our customers in the North of the country with the ability to see the latest equipment and dental technology for themselves, in one convenient location.’</p>
<p>
<p>During the evening, guests were able to meet representatives from Henry Schein Minerva’s equipment division and Dental Innovations as well as from Software of Excellence, giving them an insight into the full range of equipment and technology available from Henry Schein Minerva.</p>
<p>
<p>For more information visit <a href=http://www.henryschein.co.uk>www.henryschein.co.uk</a>.</p>
<p>^1299542400^3767^North of England gets innovative de…^Henry Schein Minerva recently celebrated the opening of its new showroom and training centre in Leeds which was attended by some of the Nort…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/showroom-HSM-copy.jpg<br />
Dentists in the dark over CQC fees^
<p>BDA calls for clarity on CQC fees   Dentists must be told what fees are to be charged for registration with the Care Quality Commission (CQC), the British Dental Association (BDA) has argued today.</p>
<p>
<p>In a letter to CQC, the BDA has said that it is unacceptable that dentists still don’t know what fees are to be charged, even though the deadline for registration is just three weeks away.</p>
<p>
<p>The letter also expresses the hope that the time that has been taken to consider this issue indicates that CQC has been able to reconsider the proposals published for consultation which would have seen small practices pay £1,500 to register.</p>
<p>
<p>In its response to that consultation the BDA argued that no fee should be charged, a point reiterated in today’s letter.</p>
<p>
<p>The BDA’s letter also highlights the plight of many dentists who must begin again their efforts to secure a Criminal Records Bureau check, after being told that primary care trusts have not supplied to CQC the required verification.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA executive board, said: ‘It is staggering that dentists are still in the dark about CQC fees so close to the deadline for registration. We call on CQC to make an announcement on this issue immediately so that practices have the information they need to plan effectively for the new financial year.</p>
<p>
<p>‘The BDA has made a strong case for no fee being charged for registration and we hope the delay means that CQC has been able to reflect on responses to its consultation and will draw a sensible conclusion that reflects the economic circumstances and the resources dental practices have invested in becoming registered.’</p>
<p>^1299542400^3768^Dentists in the dark over CQC fees^BDA calls for clarity on CQC fees   Dentists must be told what fees are to be charged for registration with the Care Quality Commission (CQC…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/darkquestion.jpg<br />
Make your habit disappear in a puff of smoke      ^
<p>According to the World Health Organization, tobacco kills up to half of its users, and the annual death toll of more than five million worldwide – an average of one person every six seconds – accounts for one in 10 adult deaths.</p>
<p>
<p>Up to half of current smokers will eventually die of a tobacco-related disease, one of which is mouth cancer, a disease that still affects some one to 10 people per 100,000 globally.</p>
<p>
<p>The British Dental Health Foundation actively campaigns on mouth cancer action for greater awareness of the killer disease, operating under the tagline of ‘If in doubt, get checked out’ in an attempt to encourage dentists and other health professionals to educate the public.</p>
<p>On Wednesday 9 March, No Smoking Day will once again attempt to get as many people as possible to quit the addiction, something nearly two thirds of the UK’s smoking population wishes to do.</p>
<p>
<p>Events will be held across the UK organised by a variety of health professionals and stop smoking services to reach smokers who wish to quit.</p>
<p>Latest figures show over 5,300 new cases of mouth cancer a year are diagnosed in the UK, while over 50% of those diagnosed survive beyond five years from diagnosis.</p>
<p>
<p>As one in five people in Great Britain smoke, the figures make grim reading for anyone with the addiction, as Richard Davidson, 51, can testify.</p>
<p>For 20 years, Richard was what you’d call a ‘heavy smoker’. Like many who are 16, a life of ignorant bliss and a blasé ‘it won’t happen to me’ attitude plagued his every day thinking, until in 2005, smoking changed his life for good.</p>
<p>‘I gave up smoking in my mid thirties and thought I’d be OK. It was nine years later when I was diagnosed with oral cancer, and although the doctors who treated me couldn’t say for sure whether it was as a result of my smoking, all the evidence points to it as the main reason.’</p>
<p>Richard’s experience is symptomatic of tobacco-related diseases, as any sign of problems take years to develop. There are early mouth cancer warning signs, including ulcers which do not heal within three weeks, red and white patches in the mouth and lumps or swellings in the mouth or neck.</p>
<p>Chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, Dr Nigel Carter, recommends only one course of action if you find any of these symptoms.</p>
<p>Dr Carter said: ‘Tobacco is the number one cause of mouth cancer, linked to around three-quarters of all cases of a disease, which kills one person every five hours in the UK. With new cases occurring all the time, many people still remain unaware of this risk.</p>
<p>‘Early detection and prevention are key to curbing the effects of oral cancer and considerably increases survival chances, allowing for simpler treatment and results in a better quality of life for sufferers.’</p>
<p>Unfortunately for Richard, his wasn’t found early enough, and as a result, his was a brutal experience of just how mouth cancer can affect your life on a daily basis.</p>
<p>‘My treatment was pretty unpleasant. I had four operations in six weeks, forty minutes of Radiotherapy on my throat every day, while all liquids and painkillers were fed to me through a tube directly into my stomach. I have a persistent dry mouth and require a ventilator at night to help me breathe. It’s a truly harrowing experience.’</p>
<p>Discharged in December and doing well, Richard thinks if sharing his experience can stop someone else going through the pain and suffering he did, it’s a good thing. What’s most interesting about his case is that at the time of diagnosis he was in the RAF and a very fit person, yet even his body was put under intense stress.</p>
<p>‘I currently work at a local primary school, and the attitude of children towards habits like smoking is appalling. Like I did, all they think is that it’ll never happen to me. Through the work of both the British Dental Health Foundation and No Smoking Day, hopefully we can educate people about the risks of smoking and the damage it can do to you, your family and the rest of your life.’</p>
<p>For information and free expert advice on oral health issues call the National Dental Helpline on 0845 063 1188, or alternatively visit www.dentalhealth.org Please visit the Foundation’s Twitter accounts: dentalhealthorg, mouthcancerorg and add our Facebook fan–page: ‘British Dental Health Foundation’.</p>
<p>
<p>For smoking cessation support, you can also contact the NHS Stop Smoking Helpline on 0800 022 4332, or visit <a href=http://www.nosmokingday.org.uk>www.nosmokingday.org.uk</a>.</p>
<p>^1299542400^3769^Make your habit disappear in a puff…^According to the World Health Organization, tobacco kills up to half of its users, and the annual death toll of more than five million world…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/pinksmoke.jpg<br />
Root canal therapy is nothing to fear^
<p>Top dentists in the UK are launching the Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign – www.savingteeth.co.uk – to provide information to patients who have a tooth infection that could result in tooth loss.</p>
<p>
<p>The campaign was prompted by the widespread lack of awareness amongst patients that many teeth can be saved by endodontics (root canal therapy).</p>
<p>
<p>Recent figures for the NHS show that two million teeth were removed last year but only approximately half a million root treatments were undertaken. The options for replacing a lost tooth might be a bridge, a denture or an implant.</p>
<p>
<p>In the interests of dental health, however, if the natural tooth can be saved through root canal therapy and adequately restored, it should be first choice.</p>
<p>
<p>The campaign’s key messages are:<br />• Saving a tooth is, where possible, better for the health of your mouth<br />• A well root-treated tooth covered with a crown can survive for many years if not for the rest of your life<br />• If a tooth becomes infected and left untreated bone loss can occur.</p>
<p>
<p>Backing for the Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign, spearheaded by root canal specialist Julian Webber, a world leader in the field of endodontics and his colleague and endodontic specialist, Trevor Lamb, is growing.</p>
<p>
<p>Supporters include recognised authorities in areas such as restorative dentistry, oral surgery, and the psychology of dentistry along with patients and high profile supporters Michael Winner and Peter Snow.</p>
<p>
<p>The campaign would like to see the NHS recognising and remunerating the additional skills and costly equipment used by specialists and dentists with additional training.</p>
<p>
<p>With new dental payment systems about to be piloted next month (April), and widespread agreement that the NHS should be rewarding quality, it is an ideal time to introduce commissioning of specialist treatment in general practice.</p>
<p>
<p>Julian Webber says: ‘While an extraction is sometimes inevitable, it should not be regarded as the easy option. It’s true that it can be carried out quickly but afterwards, many patients will not want a gap in their mouth and will seek some form of replacement, whether it’s an implant, bridge or denture and these take time. Keeping your natural teeth is often more economical in the long-term as well as being better for health.’</p>
<p>
<p>The recent Adult Dental Health Survey shows that 30% of all adults are extremely anxious about having a tooth drilled. However, modern local anaesthetics can ensure that all dental procedures that involve drilling, including root canal treatment, are painless.</p>
<p>
<p>Professor Tim Newton, Professor of Psychology as applied to dentistry, says: ‘When you feel anxious, it’s not easy to make choices. Fear of dental treatment remains a significant barrier to dental care for many people. People who are anxious will often avoid dental treatment, and when they do attend often make decisions which they might not make if they were less anxious – for example to have teeth extracted rather than have to attend for more appointments for treatment to restore their teeth.’</p>
<p>
<p>In the US, Root Canal Awareness Week starts at the end of this month with the aim of teaching the public that root canal treatment shouldn’t be feared, and that endodontists can provide a virtually pain-free experience.</p>
<p>
<p>In support of their Root Canal Awareness Week, the American Association of Endodontists carried out a survey that reveals that 70% of Americans fear losing a natural tooth although that same percentage also fears root canal treatment, the exact procedure that can save their teeth.</p>
<p>
<p>Nigel Carter, chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, described root canal therapy as ‘a vital tool’ in the battle to maintain improvements in oral health, and said: ‘The Foundation thoroughly supports the aims of the Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign in raising public awareness of the value of root canal therapy as one of the means available to today’s modern dentist to help ensure all of the public achieve healthy teeth for life.’</p>
<p>
<p><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/dentures.jpg alt=

Jeff Foulser, a patient who has had root canal treatment, says: ‘I remember both my parents taking their teeth out and putting them in a glass beside their bed. It’s certainly not what I want. I think it’s a great idea to have a campaign to remind us all of the value of root treatment and seeing your dentist.’

Campaign supporter, Peter Snow, concludes: ‘It may surprise you that it is well known within the medical profession that those with a healthy mouth live longer. The Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign aims to encourage patients to keep their teeth for life.’

For more information, visit www.savingteeth.co.uk.

^1299628800^3771^Root canal therapy is nothing to fe…^Top dentists in the UK are launching the Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign – www.savingteeth.co.uk – to provide information to pat…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/eyefear.jpg
Dentists in unique position to help smokers quit^

Dental experts believes No Smoking Day tomorrow (9 March) provides an ideal opportunity for the dental team to talk to patients who wish to quit smoking.

With around 21% of the UK’s population still smoking, the risk of developing mouth cancer, the fifth most common cancer in the UK, is a growing concern amongst those in the dental profession.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, says: ‘When you consider that your mouth and teeth are susceptible to the effects of the 4,000 or so chemicals contained in cigarettes, it is encouraging to know two thirds of people who do smoke want to give up.

‘Many people are now aware of the dangers smoking can cause, including tooth staining, dental plaque, bad breath, tooth loss and gum disease, which has been linked to serious medical problems and fatal heart and lung diseases. The habit has also been linked to premature and low birth weight babies. The Foundation continues to support No Smoking Day.’

Tobacco is the most likely cause of mouth cancer, linked to around three-quarters of all cases of a disease which kills one person every five hours in the UK.

With new cases occurring all the time, many people still remain unaware of the risk smoking poses.

Dr Carter said: ‘The dental profession is in a unique position to warn patients of the risks and consequences of smoking.

‘In September, dentists in Dublin and Cork offered free mouth examinations, and six cases of mouth cancer were found. This only serves to further reinforce the message that regular visits to the dentist can help detect early signs of mouth cancer.’

Early mouth cancer warning signs include red and white patches in the mouth, ulcers which do not heal within three weeks and lumps or swellings in the mouth or neck.

Early detection and prevention are key to curbing the effects of oral cancer and considerably increases survival chances, allowing for simpler treatment and results in a better quality of life for sufferers.

For information and free expert advice on oral health issues call the National Dental Helpline on 0845 063 1188, or alternatively visit www.dentalhealth.org.

For smoking cessation support, you can also contact the NHS Stop Smoking Helpline on 0800 022 4332, or visit www.dentalhealth.org.

^1299542400^3770^Dentists in unique position to help…^Dental experts believes No Smoking Day tomorrow (9 March) provides an ideal opportunity for the dental team to talk to patients who wish to …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/cigarette-cancer.jpg
Scientists discover why we crave chocolate^

Scientists have discovered that taste cells have several addition sugar detectors on top of the previously known sweet receptor.

This could be a key step in developing strategies to limit overconsumption, according to this study. Senior author Robert F Margolskee, MD, PhD, a molecular neurobiologist said: ‘Detecting the sweetness of nutritive sugars is one of the most important tasks of our taste cells.

‘Many of us eat too much sugar and to help limit overconsumption, we need to better understand how a sweet taste cell knows something is sweet.’

‘Scientists have known for some time that the T1r2+T1r3 receptor is the primary mechanism that allows taste cells to detect many sweet compounds, including sugars such as glucose and sucrose and also artificial sweeteners, including saccharin and aspartame. However, some aspects of sweet taste could not be explained by the T1r2+T1r3 receptor.

‘For example, although the receptor contains two subunits that must join together for it to work properly, Margolskee’s team had previously found that mice engineered to be missing the T1r3 subunit were still able to taste glucose and other sugars normally. The results show that several sugar sensors from intestine and pancreas also are present in exactly those same sweet-sensing taste cells that have the T1r2+T1r3 sweet receptor.

‘The taste system continues to amaze me at how smart it is and how it serves to integrate taste sensation with digestive processes.’

The different sugar taste sensors may have varied roles. An intestinal glucose sensor also found to be located in the sweet-sensitive taste cells may provide an explanation for another mystery of sweet taste: why just a pinch of table salt tastes sweet or salt added to baked goods enhances sweet taste.

Known as SGLT1, this sensor is a transporter that moves glucose into the sweet taste cell when sodium is present, thus triggering the cell to register sweetness. In pancreas, the sugar sensor known as the KATP channel, monitors glucose levels and triggers insulin release when they rise.

The authors speculate that KATP may function in sweet taste cells to modulate taste cell sensitivity to sugars according to metabolic needs.

For example, this sensor may respond to hormonal signals from the gut or pancreas to make taste cells less responsive to sweets after we have just eaten a sugary piece of pecan pie and do not need additional energy.

First author Karen K Yee, PhD, a cellular physiologist, says: ‘Sweet taste cells have turned out to be quite complex. The presence of the KATP channel suggests that taste cells may play a role in regulating our sensitivity to sweet taste under different nutritional conditions. This knowledge may some day help us understand how to limit overconsumption of sweet foods.’


• SOURCE: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online March 7, 2011

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Dentists plan to ease fear of root canal therapy^

Leading dental professionals in the UK are launching the Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign – www.savingteeth.co.uk – to provide information to patients who have a tooth infection that could result in tooth loss.

The campaign was prompted by the widespread lack of awareness amongst patients that many teeth can be saved by endodontics (root canal therapy).

Recent figures for the NHS show that two million teeth were removed last year but only approximately half a million root treatments were undertaken.

The campaign’s key messages are:
• Saving a tooth is, where possible, better for the health of your mouth
• A well root-treated tooth covered with a crown can survive for many years if not for the rest of your life
• If a tooth becomes infected and left untreated bone loss can occur.

Backing for the Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign is growing.

It’s spearheaded by endodontist experts Julian Webber and Trevor Lamb.

Supporters include recognised authorities in areas such as restorative dentistry, oral surgery, and the psychology of dentistry along with patients and high profile supporters Michael Winner and Peter Snow.

The campaign would like to see the NHS recognising and remunerating the additional skills and costly equipment used by specialists and dentists with additional training.

With new dental payment systems about to be piloted next month (April), and widespread agreement that the NHS should be rewarding quality, it is an ideal time to introduce commissioning of specialist treatment in general practice.

Julian Webber says: ‘While an extraction is sometimes inevitable, it should not be regarded as the easy option. It’s true that it can be carried out quickly but afterwards, many patients will not want a gap in their mouth and will seek some form of replacement, whether it’s an implant, bridge or denture and these take time. Keeping your natural teeth is often more economical in the long-term as well as being better for health.’

The recent Adult Dental Health Survey shows that 30% of all adults are extremely anxious about having a tooth drilled.

However, modern local anaesthetics can ensure that all dental procedures that involve drilling, including root canal treatment, are painless.

Professor Tim Newton, Professor of Psychology as applied to dentistry, says: ‘When you feel anxious, it’s not easy to make choices. Fear of dental treatment remains a significant barrier to dental care for many people.

‘People who are anxious will often avoid dental treatment, and when they do attend often make decisions which they might not make if they were less anxious – for example to have teeth extracted rather than have to attend for more appointments for treatment to restore their teeth.’

‘In the US, Root Canal Awareness Week starts at the end of this month with the aim of teaching the public that root canal treatment shouldn’t be feared, and that endodontists can provide a virtually pain-free experience.

In support of their Root Canal Awareness Week, the American Association of Endodontists carried out a survey that reveals that 70% of Americans fear losing a natural tooth although that same percentage also fears root canal treatment, the exact procedure that can save their teeth.

Nigel Carter, chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, described root canal therapy as ‘a vital tool’ in the battle to maintain improvements in oral health, and said: ‘The Foundation thoroughly supports the aims of the Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign in raising public awareness of the value of root canal therapy as one of the means available to today’s modern dentist to help ensure all of the public achieve healthy teeth for life.’

Jeff Foulser, a patient who has had root canal treatment, says: ‘I remember both my parents taking their teeth out and putting them in a glass beside their bed. It’s certainly not what I want. I think it’s a great idea to have a campaign to remind us all of the value of root treatment and seeing your dentist.’

Campaign supporter, Peter Snow, concludes: ‘It may surprise you that it is well known within the medical profession that those with a healthy mouth live longer. The Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign aims to encourage patients to keep their teeth for life.’

For more information, visit www.savingteeth.co.uk.

^1299628800^3772^Dentists plan to ease fear of root …^Leading dental professionals in the UK are launching the Saving Teeth Awareness Campaign – www.savingteeth.co.uk – to provide in…^
Chief dental officer goes digital^

Chief dental officer for England, Barry Cockcroft, has gone digital.

An e-version of his CDO update is now available online – to make it easier to reach dentists up and down the country.

The February issue is currently live and topics include the latest on contract reform, the outcome of the fluoridation JR and the forthcoming NHS Dental Services online portal launch for providers and performers.

Plus, there are all the usual regular updates from the Department of Health dental policy team – including a look at the adult dental health survey, decontamination and blood borne viruses and the latest on CQC registration.

To see February’s issue, click here. The next issue is due out in April.

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<p>^1299628800^3774^Chief dental officer goes digital^Chief dental officer for England, Barry Cockcroft, has gone digital.An e-version of his CDO update is now available online – to make i…^<br />
Dental software company to the rescue^
<p>Practice management software company Software of Excellence has come to the aid of the 200 practices who have, until now, been customers of TAB Dental.</p>
<p>
<p>With 1 April and a new fee structure on the horizon, TAB Dental found themselves unable to meet their ongoing commitments in terms of support and product upgrades.</p>
<p>
<p>They turned immediately to Software of Excellence who has now provided a solution in the form of Exact Evolution.<br /> <br />Software of Excellence is offering TAB customers the opportunity to transfer to Exact Evolution without charge until 1 April.</p>
<p>
<p>Customers then have the option to take advantage of the full Exact Professional product, or a wide range of ‘add on’ products and services if they so wish.<br /> <br />Software of Excellence’s managing director, Brian Weatherly, is delighted that SOE was able to move so quickly to help practices in need.<br /> <br />‘It has been a worrying few weeks for TAB practices, particularly for those with an NHS contract. However, by working closely with Robert and Tracy Collar the owners of TAB Dental, we have been able to provide a no cost, minimum fuss solution that offers TAB Dental customers a like-for-like featured product.</p>
<p>
<p>‘This will give them a secure, reliable and permanent solution. We are also proud to make available to TAB Dental customers a wide range of additional products and services from our international product suites, as well as upgrade options to Exact Professional if these options are of interest.’ <br /> <br />If you want more information about this offer, please call 0845 345 5767 or visit <a href=http://www.soeidental.com>www.soeidental.com</a>.</p>
<p>^1299628800^3775^Dental software company to the resc…^Practice management software company Software of Excellence has come to the aid of the 200 practices who have, until now, been customers of …^<br />
Dentists invited to join child tooth decay study^
<p>Hundreds of dental practices across the UK will be invited to participate in a major trial to assess the benefits of three different methods of managing tooth decay in children.</p>
<p>
<p>Distribution of letters to 300 practices in Cardiff, Dundee, Glasgow, Leeds, London, Newcastle and Sheffield will begin over the next month, asking them if they are prepared to join the FiCTION trial, which has been commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA).</p>
<p>
<p>Dental decay is one of the most common childhood diseases, with over 40% of children in the UK already experiencing obvious decay in their primary (baby) teeth by five years of age, and this statistic has remained largely unchanged for the past 20 years.</p>
<p>
<p>Only around 12% of obviously decayed baby teeth in five year olds are treated with fillings, while the vast majority are left untreated, and dental extractions remain the most common reason for children in the UK to receive an out-patient general anaesthetic.</p>
<p>
<p>The FiCTION trial is led by the University of Dundee and the University of Leeds, working with colleagues at the Universities of Cardiff, Glasgow, London, Newcastle and Sheffield.</p>
<p>
<p>It is examining the benefits of three different methods of managing tooth decay in baby teeth:<br />• Using only preventive techniques recommended in national guidance (better toothbrushing, less sugar in the diet, application of high fluoride varnish and fissure sealants) to stop the decay.<br />• Conventional fillings (numbing with local anaesthetic injections then drilling away decay before placing a filling in the cavity) with preventive techniques<br />• Biological treatment of the decay (sealing the decay into teeth with filling materials or under crowns, generally without the need to use injections or dental drills) with preventive techniques</p>
<p>
<p>The study is also examining what the children, all aged between three and seven, think of the different types of treatments.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Nicola Innes, of the University of Dundee Dental School and one of the lead researchers for the<br />FiCTION trial, says: ‘Dental decay is one of the most common diseases of childhood, with a large health and economic impact.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Conventional clinical opinion is that baby teeth showing decay should be filled, yet the majority of cavities in young children are left unrestored. There is, as yet, no conclusive evidence for the most effective approach to managing decay in baby teeth. With this trial we are looking to provide that evidence.’</p>
<p>
<p>A pilot study preceding the main trial has been running in Tayside, Sheffield and Newcastle and is in the closing stages of recruitment of 200 child patients.</p>
<p>
<p>The main trial is expected to begin early in 2012 and will involve around 200 dentists across the UK.</p>
<p>
<p>Participating dentists will be from general dental practices throughout the UK where children who attend for regular dental care will be invited to take part.</p>
<p>
<p>In addition to the preventive treatment for all children in the trial, they will be randomly assigned to one of the three treatment groups.</p>
<p>
<p>The children will be asked to rate on a special scale any discomfort they felt during each treatment and asked about what they think of the different ways of treating their teeth.</p>
<p>
<p>All children in the trial will be seen by their dentist up to four times per year and checked for any problems which require care.</p>
<p>
<p>For more information on the FiCTION trial, visit <a href=http://www.fictiontrial.info>www.fictiontrial.info</a>.</p>
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Legacy will fund dental archive^
<p>A bequest from former BDA president, John Walford McLean OBE, is to be used to fund work on an archive documenting the history of dentistry since the start of the NHS.</p>
<p>
<p>The recently launched <em>John McLean Archive: A Living History of Dentistry</em>, is being developed in conjunction with King’s College London Dental Institute’s (KCLDI’s) Unit for the History of Dentistry and will fill a void in the dental profession’s recorded history.</p>
<p>
<p>Members of the McLean family presented the BDA Trust Fund with a cheque in support of dental research, which will be used to fund the archive, at a reception held at BDA headquarters in London.</p>
<p>
<p>The reception was attended by trustees of the Fund, representatives of KCLDI and the BDA, and members of the project’s team, including Professor Stanley Gelbier and Dr Steve Simmons from KCLDI’s Unit for the History of Dentistry, and BDA museum staff members Rachel Bairsto, Melanie Parker and Sophie Riches.</p>
<p>
<p>Head of BDA museum services, Rachel Bairsto said: ‘In time, this archive will provide an essential record of the significant evolution of the dental profession from 1948 onwards. This will be invaluable for generations of professionals to come.</p>
<p>
<p>‘We are honoured to be given the opportunity to realise this project through the generosity of one of the most highly-regarded leaders in the profession, John McLean, whose legacy will long be remembered.’</p>
<p>
<p>The project will comprise a series of witness seminars and individual oral history interviews, and encompass the full breadth of dentistry in the UK.</p>
<p>
<p>The first witness seminar, chaired by dean and Head of KCLDI Professor Nairn Wilson and facilitated by the BDA museum’s honorary curator professor Stanley Gelbier, will be taking place on Friday 25 March between 11am and 4pm at the BDA’s headquarters in London.</p>
<p>
<p>The session will explore, amongst other things, dentistry prior to 1956, the role of the Dental Board, the introduction of the General Dental Council, interaction with the BDA, specialisation, and the role of the protection organisations. <br /> <br />The BDA is calling for witnesses to participate in this first seminar to discuss and debate their reminiscences.</p>
<p>
<p>Those wishing to participate should contact Sophie Riches, oral history co-ordinator, at Sophie.Riches@bda.org.</p>
<p>^1299715200^3777^Legacy will fund dental archive^A bequest from former BDA president, John Walford McLean OBE, is to be used to fund work on an archive documenting the history of dentistry …^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/BDA-legacy.jpg<br />
Passionate dental nurses wanted ^
<p>The National Examining Board for Dental Nurses (NEBDN) is seeking to recruit new members to its Panel of Examiners in order to deliver a new assessment of the National Certificate in Dental Nursing qualification in 2011.</p>
<p>
<p>Featuring Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), NEBDN has completely revised the format of the qualification in order to provide a more modern approach to the assessment of dental nurses.</p>
<p>
<p>To become an examiner with NEBDN you must:<br />• Have previous experience of assessing OSCEs within dental training<br />• Be registered with the General Dental Council<br />• Be currently practicing as a dental aurgeon or dental care crofessional <br />• Have two years’ experience since qualification<br />• Be well organised and able to maintain high quality standards<br />• Be passionate about dental nurse education and helping people reach their full potential</p>
<p>
<p>Becoming an examiner will help you to:<br />• Improve your personal development and professional status<br />• Develop your skills and understanding of dental nurse education and training <br />• Gain verifiable CPD through ongoing support and training<br />• Network with other professionals with a commitment to improving dental nurse education</p>
<p>
<p>For further information and an application pack, visit <a href=http://www.nebdn.org>www.nebdn.org</a> or contact sarah@nebdn.org.</p>
<p>
<p>Full training and support will be provided.</p>
<p>
<p>Successful applicants will be invited to an assessment day in May 2011. <br /> </p>
<p>^1299715200^3778^Passionate dental nurses wanted ^The National Examining Board for Dental Nurses (NEBDN) is seeking to recruit new members to its Panel of Examiners in order to deliver a new…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/nurseworking.png<br />
Lego heads wired to educate dental patients^
<p>One of the main aims of the 2010 National Orthodontic Week (NOW) was raising public awareness – and a number of novel initiatives were developed to engage with them during the campaign in order to highlight the benefits of orthodontic treatment.</p>
<p>
<p>After a high-profile launch at the V&A Museum of Childhood last month, the British Orthodontics Society (BOS) staged a week of fun at the museum during half term week, offering visitors the chance to ‘Meet an orthodontist’.</p>
<p>
<p>This is the museum’s busiest week, when 2,000-plus people a day visit, and the Society was given a plum position in the dining area from which they could offer members of the public advice about orthodontics and what it could achieve for them.</p>
<p>
<p>In order to engage with as many young people as possible, the Society commissioned two designers from Legoland to build two Lego heads – graphically illustrating a mouth ‘before’ and ‘after’ orthodontic treatment.</p>
<p>
<p>Visitors were asked to estimate the number of bricks used to make both heads and Philips provided a prize of a Sonicare For Kids for the entrant whose answer was closest to the right number.</p>
<p>
<p>Chairman of the British Orthodontic Society, Dr Nigel Harradine, along with orthodontic consultant, Nikki Johnson, appeared on 15 radio stations during launch day, providing interviews and answering questions about orthodontic treatment.</p>
<p>
<p>Post-broadcast analysis showed they reached an audience of two million listeners and were on air for a total of one hour and 40 minutes, reaching stations as far  afield as Newcastle and the Channel Islands as well as specialist stations targeting both Christian and Punjabi audiences.</p>
<p>
<p>Practices the length and breadth of Britain put on their own National Orthodontic Week initiatives and hightlights included a charity bike ride the equivalent distance of Land’s End to John O’Groats, carried out on a static exercise bike in a practice waiting room, while another held a poster design competition with an art exhibition of the winning entries displayed in the practice during NOW.</p>
<p>
<p>One practice used puppets with large teeth as part of their public outreach initiative, while another gave out NOW branded water bottles to commuters at a local train station.</p>
<p>
<p>If you would like to listen to all the radio broadcasts; see pictures of the Lego heads; participate in the recipe competition [see below], download the winning entries that have already been submitted, in fact to see details of the whole campaign, the dedicated National Orthodontic Week website address is <a href=http://www.nowsmile.org>www.nowsmile.org.</a></p>
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Dentists applaud new smoking plans^
<p>The British Dental Association has joined other members of the Smokefree Action Coalition in applauding this week’s government announcement of a plan to reduce smoking prevalence.</p>
<p>
<p>The plan includes prohibiting the display of tobacco products in large shops by April 2012 and small shops by April 2015 and a commitment to consult on forcing tobacco products to be sold in plain packaging.</p>
<p>
<p>It also sets out targets for the reduction of smoking prevalence in adults, children and pregnant women.<br /> <br />Professor Damien Walmsley, scientific adviser to the BDA, said: ‘Tobacco use has a significant negative impact on dental health, contributing to the increasing number of cases of oral cancers and conditions such as gum disease.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Tobacco is one of the factors that creates and perpetuates oral health inequalities in the UK. As a member of the Smokefree Action Coalition the BDA is committed to eradicating the harm that tobacco does to the nation’s health and we applaud this week’s announcement as a positive step forward.’</p>
<p>^1299801600^3780^Dentists applaud new smoking plans^The British Dental Association has joined other members of the Smokefree Action Coalition in applauding this week’s government announc…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/thumbs-up.jpg<br />
Heavy drinking and gullet cancer – no link^
<p>Heavy drinking is not associated with one of the two most common types of gullet (oesophageal) cancer, suggests research published online in <em>Gut</em>.</p>
<p>Gullet cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide and occurs as one of two main types: squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma.</p>
<p>But while rates of gullet adenocarcinoma have soared in many Western countries over the past three decades, those of squamous cell carcinoma have been falling.</p>
<p>
<p>The squamous cell variety is strongly linked to alcohol consumption.</p>
<p>The authors pooled data from 11 international studies, involving 15,000 participants and 4,600 cases in the Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON) on both types of gullet cancer, plus another arising at the junction of the lower gullet and the stomach (oesophagogastric junction or OGJA for short).</p>
<p>Heavy drinkers – seven or more alcoholic drinks a day – were more than 9.5 times as likely to develop oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma as non-drinkers.</p>
<p>But the authors found no evidence linking this level of alcohol consumption, or, for that matter, any particular type of alcohol, to heightened risk of either oesophageal adenocarcinoma or OGJA.</p>
<p>And light drinkers – half to one unit of alcohol daily – had a lower risk of these gullet cancers than non-drinkers, although low alcohol consumption could simply reflect other aspects of a healthy lifestyle, or chance, say the authors.</p>
<p>The authors say: ‘Our results for [oesophageal adenocarcinoma] and OGJA stand in remarkable contrast to results for [oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma] in this and previously published studies.’</p>
<p>The findings suggest that the risk factors for gullet cancer vary according to the type of disease, they say, adding that other research suggests that weight, smoking, and infection with Helicobacter pylori also confer different levels of risk for the two most common forms of this cancer.</p>
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MPs and peers visit dental institute^
<p>For the first time, a group of MPs and Peers from the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for dentistry visited King’s College London’s Dental Institute.</p>
<p>
<p>They were there to learn more about dental education in the UK and the importance of its links with clinical service provision and research, both dental and across healthcare.</p>
<p>
<p>The visit consisted of: <br />• A tour of the dental institute facilities, including its world renowned craniofacial development and stem cell research laboratories<br />• The clinical facilities for the care of vulnerable and anxious patients<br />• Pre-clinical training facilities, both traditional and innovative.</p>
<p>
<p>Professor Nairn Wilson, dean and head of the dental institute, said: ‘We were delighted to  welcome the APPG for Dentistry to King’s today. I hope we have demonstrated that there is more to a dental school than meets the eye.</p>
<p>
<p>‘At a centre of excellence such as King’s College London Dental Institute undergraduate education is inextricably linked to clinical service provision, research and the education of all members of the dental team.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Dental education at all levels is vital to ensure that members of the dental team of tomorrow are fully equipped to deal with the existing and anticipated future challenges in dentistry in the 21st century.</p>
<p>
<p>‘We were delighted to host the first visit of members of the APPG to a dental school. Having insight of arrangements for dental education is considered important in overseeing the national provision of dentistry.’</p>
<p>
<p>Sir Paul Beresford MP and chair of the APPG for dentistry, said: ‘This was a great opportunity for Members of the House of Commons and the Lords to visit one of the world’s leading dental schools.</p>
<p>
<p>‘It was a chance to witness first hand the fantastic facilities that King’s College London Dental Institute has to offer and further our knowledge in dental education. It is very kind of King’s to have organised this tour for us and the APPG for Dentistry found it extremely helpful and interesting.’</p>
<p>
<p>The APPG for dentistry was established in December 2008 and acts as a focus for dental and oral health issues, raising the profile of dentistry in Parliament and highlighting the views of both patients and the profession.</p>
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A mix of science and art^
<p>I was going to tell you about my experience at the Dentistry Show but I didn’t go! I’d felt a bit poorly in the days leading up to it but nevertheless had loaded the car up ready for an early start on Friday 4 March.</p>
<p>
<p>I duly got up at 6.00am, felt awful and went back to bed. When I visited my GP three days later, she diagnosed laryngitis!</p>
<p>
<p>This meant my ‘mint’ co-founder, Alex Nicolaou, had to do the mint natters we’d arranged for the show single-handed.</p>
<p>
<p>He did very well but, not surprisingly, confessed to feeling exhausted at the end of each day.</p>
<p>
<p>Giving, and taking, advice is remarkably tiring (but should never be tiresome). To those doing hard physical jobs this may sound a bit wimpish but, ironically, physical inactivity can induce fatigue.</p>
<p>
<p>Getting back to marketing, a new (non-dental) client of mine is exhibiting at a major show in a few weeks – something she’s not done before.</p>
<p>
<p>When I spoke with her, she was feeling overwhelmed by stand graphics, the cost of power points, leaflet designs, the need for new business cards, how to man her stand, where to park the car, what to wear – the lot!</p>
<p>
<p>She said she felt as though everything was in progress and nothing could be finalised. She was exhausted before the show had even begun.</p>
<p>
<p>We discussed and agreed an action plan that would see her accomplish this marketing exercise a) without having a heart attack and b) having learned a lot.</p>
<p>
<p>Yes, her graphics may not be the best and, yes, parking the car may cost a fortune but the important thing is that she’ll be at the show.</p>
<p>
<p>She’ll meet potential customers, find out which of her training services they are (and are not) interested in and, most likely, secure some new business.</p>
<p>
<p>My point? While there are many proven principles to be followed in marketing, it remains a mix of science and art.</p>
<p>
<p>You should expect not to get everything right first time but to learn and subsequently adjust your marketing strategy and tactics as you go. The important thing is to be in the marketplace, doing your business.</p>
<p>
<p>And if you are unfortunate enough to be struck down at 6.00am, make sure there’s someone to take your place. Thanks Alex – I guess I ‘owe’ you!</p>
<p>
<p>If you’d like to arrange a mint natter with Alex or myself, email kate@mint-tastic.co.uk.</p>
<p>^1299801600^3782^A mix of science and art^I was going to tell you about my experience at the Dentistry Show but I didn’t go! I’d felt a bit poorly in the days leading up to it but ne…^<br />
Snap-On Smile ^
<p>DKAP offer the impressive portfolio of Den-Mat products online including: Core Paste, Geristore, Tenure and Infinity, to name just a few.  </p>
<p>The latest addition to the Den-mat product range is Snap-On Smile.</p>
<p>
<p>Snap-on Smile simply snaps in and out over your patients natural teeth, as a non-invasive option, it’s easily removable and completely reversible.</p>
<p>It can be the ideal solution for solving a wide variety of both short- and long-term clinical challenges.</p>
<p>
<p>Its applications include: Raising vertical dimension, Cosmetic smile enhancement, Removable cosmetic partial denture and implant temporary.</p>
<p>For more information and to download lab dockets and instructions, visit <a href=http://www.snaponsmile.co.uk>www.snaponsmile.co.uk</a>. </p>
<p>DKAP also offer LUMINEERS porcelain veneers, backed by over 20 years of clinical history Den-Mat has now developed LUMINEERS 2 – 30% stronger than original Lumineers and now with a limited lifetime warranty.</p>
<p>The LUMINEERS philosophy is to preserve natural tooth structure whenever possible. The high strength of Cerinate allows LUMINEERS to be made contact lens-thin, without increased risk of breakage, so you can place veneers without the need for anaesthetic, extensive prepping, or temporaries. </p>
<p>Learn the LUMINEERS technique at a one day placement course, book your place on line today. </p>
<p>A full day study including hands-on training covering contouring, colour modification, placement and finishing.  </p>
<p>Enhance your practice with Den-Mat’s unique Sapphire Plasma Arc Light. Not only a curing light, the Sapphire also supports whitening, potentially life saving Lesion Detection and NEW Soft Tissue management. </p>
<p>Log on today, place an order or book a course place online.  Enter the exclusive promotional code denweb to receive a £20 discount on any order over £100. Valid until for 1 use until 30/04/11</p>
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<hr />
<p>
<p><a href=http://www.dkap.co.uk>www.dkap.co.uk</a><br /><a href=http://www.snaponsmile.co.uk >www.snaponsmile.co.uk </a><br /> <br />Tel:08451 301611</p>
<p>
<p><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/SOS-NEW-AUG-2010-B.jpg alt=

 

^1299801600^3783^Snap-On Smile ^DKAP offer the impressive portfolio of Den-Mat products online including: Core Paste, Geristore, Tenure and Infinity, to name just a few.&nb…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/jg_sos_insert-sm-HI-res-image.jpg
WIN a copy of dentist James Goolnik’s book^

Here is a chance to WIN a copy of successful dentist James Goolnik’s new book, Brush: Proven strategies to make you and your dental business shine.

In it, James shares with you his blueprint to creating both a successful life and a successful dental practice.

Why is it that when it comes to new opportunities, it’s always the same dentists who get to them first? There has never been a better time to be in dentistry, but what does the future hold?

These questions and more are answered inside the book.

James has chosen Dentaid to receive all the profits of his book and the first project they plan to assist is a dental programme for rural poor in Cambodia.

Andy Jong, of Dentaid, says: ‘James’s generous support from his book will mean our Cambodian partner can launch their oral health education programme into more schools and offer significantly better quality community oral health care from the surgeries they will now receive.

Business coach, Chris Barrow, adds: ‘This book is relevant, authentic and overflowing with practical wisdom/great ideas – it shows how any dentist with passion, knowledge, skill and the right attitude can follow James to the summit of personal and professional achievement. Read it – there is always room at the top.’

James qualified in 1992 from King’s College London. He has worked exclusively in the City since 1995. He took two years off to gain a masters degree in conservative dentistry at the world-renowned Eastman Dental Institute.

He is the immediate past-president of the British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and a member of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD).

The AACD is the largest international dental organisation dedicated to advancing the art and science of cosmetic dentistry. He writes for Maxim magazine and has appeared on many television and radio interviews.

The book launches today (11 March) and we are offering 10 lucky readers a FREE copy.

 


All you have to do is simply answer the question:

 

1. Where is the clinic that Dentaid are planning to build?

Email [email protected] with the answer and your name and he will pick 10 winners at random.

Closing date is 31 March 2011.

Usual rules and conditions apply

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<p>^1299801600^3784^WIN a copy of dentist James Goolnik…^Here is a chance to WIN a copy of successful dentist James Goolnik’s new book, Brush: Proven strategies to make you and your dental bu…^<br />
Which ‘ageing’ celebrity has these yellowing teeth?^
<p>It was No Smoking Day this week – and for the third year running Aisleyne Horgan-Wallace was very much involved in the campaign. </p>
<p>She bravely stripped to a bikini to how cigarettes give you knackered lungs, yellow teeth, wrinkly skin and a camel toe.</p>
<p>
<p><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/aileen.jpg alt=

She says: ‘The photographs are a series of dramatic images taken to mark No Smoking Day to show how a person who smokes will age over a 40-year period if they continue to smoke 20 cigarettes each day.’

A key component of this year’s effort was the creation of a WeQuit website and Facebook app which is described as ‘a fab new way to help people quit smoking with help from their friends’.

Featuring prominently on this site is a new video blog which Aisleyne has filmed, where she tells her ‘Quit Story’ with the aim of encouraging people to tell their own stories of the trials and triumphs of quitting the habit.

In the video, she answers a series of questions explaining the reasons why she gave up smoking, how long it took her to give up, her biggest challenges and the role of friends and family. The video ends with an invitation to people to send in their own videos and stories of giving up smoking.

PLUS there’s another video which shows Dragons’ Den business guru, Duncan Bannatyne, as you’ve never seen him before!

You can find the website and Facebook app at www.wequit.co.uk and www.wequit.co.uk/facebook.

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<p>^1299801600^3785^Which ‘ageing’ celebrity has these …^It was No Smoking Day this week – and for the third year running Aisleyne Horgan-Wallace was very much involved in the campaign. She b…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/yellow.jpg<br />
Pension reforms will affect dentists’ morale^
<p>The British Dental Association (BDA) has criticised the recommendations of the Hutton Review, arguing that the proposals are unnecessary and could have a significant negative impact on the ability of dental services to care for patients.</p>
<p>
<p>The review proposes changes including raising the retirement age and basing NHS employees’ pensions on average lifetime earnings, rather than final salaries as is currently the case.</p>
<p>
<p>The BDA is concerned that increasing the retirement age will place additional demands on dentists, who work in a physically demanding and stressful profession.</p>
<p>
<p>It also believes these changes will exacerbate the recruitment and retention issues already faced by salaried health service dentistry, both by prompting a raft of retirements among current staff and making careers in these posts less attractive to young dentists considering their career options.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA’s executive board, said: ‘We are disappointed by these recommendations which we believe are unjustified and potentially damaging.</p>
<p>
<p>‘They come just three years after the implementation of reviews to the NHS Pension Scheme that were agreed between NHS Employers and health unions and are based on a presumption we disagree with, that final salary pensions are unaffordable in the long term.</p>
<p>
<p>‘We believe that these changes, if adopted, will adversely affect the morale of dentists and could exacerbate the recruitment problems salaried dentistry already experiences, meaning that some of society’s most vulnerable patients could find it harder to access appropriate dental care.</p>
<p>
<p>‘We urge government to think very carefully about the ramifications of these proposals.’</p>
<p>
<p>Further information about the proposals, along with the BDA’s submissions of evidence to Lord Hutton’s inquiry, is available at <a href=http://www.bda.org/Huttonfinalsalarypension>www.bda.org/Huttonfinalsalarypension</a>.</p>
<p>^1299801600^3787^Pension reforms will affect dentist…^The British Dental Association (BDA) has criticised the recommendations of the Hutton Review, arguing that the proposals are unnecessary and…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/retirementwatch.jpg<br />
Pension reforms will affect dentists’ morale^
<p>The British Dental Association (BDA) has criticised the recommendations of the Hutton Review, arguing that the proposals are unnecessary and could have a significant negative impact on the ability of dental services to care for patients.</p>
<p>
<p>The review proposes changes including raising the retirement age and basing NHS employees’ pensions on average lifetime earnings, rather than final salaries as is currently the case.</p>
<p>
<p>The BDA is concerned that increasing the retirement age will place additional demands on dentists, who work in a physically demanding and stressful profession.</p>
<p>
<p>It also believes these changes will exacerbate the recruitment and retention issues already faced by salaried health service dentistry, both by prompting a raft of retirements among current staff and making careers in these posts less attractive to young dentists considering their career options.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA’s executive board, said: ‘We are disappointed by these recommendations which we believe are unjustified and potentially damaging.</p>
<p>
<p>‘They come just three years after the implementation of reviews to the NHS Pension Scheme that were agreed between NHS Employers and health unions and are based on a presumption we disagree with, that final salary pensions are unaffordable in the long term.</p>
<p>
<p>‘We believe that these changes, if adopted, will adversely affect the morale of dentists and could exacerbate the recruitment problems salaried dentistry already experiences, meaning that some of society’s most vulnerable patients could find it harder to access appropriate dental care.</p>
<p>
<p>‘We urge government to think very carefully about the ramifications of these proposals.’</p>
<p>
<p>Further information about the proposals, along with the BDA’s submissions of evidence to Lord Hutton’s inquiry, is available at <a href=http://www.bda.org/Huttonfinalsalarypension>www.bda.org/Huttonfinalsalarypension</a>.</p>
<p>^1299801600^3788^Pension reforms will affect dentist…^The British Dental Association (BDA) has criticised the recommendations of the Hutton Review, arguing that the proposals are unnecessary and…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/retirementwatch.jpg<br />
Refine your clinical skills and knowledge^
<p>On offer to GDPs with at least three years of clinical experience, the Postgraduate Diploma in Endodontic Practice provides unparalleled hands-on training in endodontics over two years.</p>
<p>
<p>The first year, taught over 24 full days, provides academic, practical and clinical training delivered through seminars and lectures as well as skills training using extracted teeth in the Eastman’s modern skills laboratories.</p>
<p>
<p>The second year of the course gives participants the opportunity to treat referred patients under supervision in the newly equipped surgeries at the UCL Eastman CPD site at 123 Gray’s Inn Road, as well as attending Consultant new patient clinics at the main Eastman hospital site to further their diagnostic and treatment planning skills.  <br /> <br />Designed for busy practitioners who wish to enhance their knowledge of and expertise in endodontics whilst continuing to work in practice, the course is divided into three components:</p>
<p>
<p>• Endodontic sciences<br />• Clinical endodontics<br />• Practical endodontics<br /> <br />The course provides intensive training for clinicians wishing to refine and improve their practical skills and the learning experience is supported by an interactive website where participants can read course material and take part in online discussions.</p>
<p>
<p>The programme has been designed to assist in meeting the competency requirements for ‘Dentists with a Special Interest in Endodontics’, and to give its successful participants the confidence and skills required to treat patients on referral.<br /> <br />The programme emphasises clinical excellence and provides a foundation upon which practitioners may consider progressing to further postgraduate qualifications such as a full time MSc in Endodontics or Specialist Training.<br /> <br />Closing date: Applications are encouraged by 27 May 2011. There will be a selection process consisting of an interview and aptitude tests; early application is advised.<br /> </p>
<hr />
<p>For further information, please contact:<br /> <br />Miss Nisha Gosai, Registry Officer<br />UCL Eastman Dental Institute, 256 Gray’s Inn Road, London WC1X 8LD<br />t: +44 (0)20 7915 1092<br />f: +44 (0)20 7915 1274<br />e: academic@eastman.ucl.ac.uk</p>
<p>^1300060800^3789^Refine your clinical skills and kno…^On offer to GDPs with at least three years of clinical experience, the Postgraduate Diploma in Endodontic Practice provides unparalleled han…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Dentist-general-pic.png<br />
Raising the profile of cosmetic dentistry^
<p>The British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (BACD) is dedicated to raising the profile of cosmetic dentistry in the UK.</p>
<p>
<p>As a key part of this work, its website at <a href=http://www.bacd.com>www.bacd.com</a> is central to communicating with its membership, the public and the media.<br /> <br />In order to ensure it presents both the appropriate outward face of the organisation and delivers a range of features and benefits for its members and media users, the BACD has decided that its current website now requires a review, redesign and relaunch.  <br /> <br />On this basis, the BACD has launched a formal tender process inviting companies with relevant skills and experience to register their interest for this important project.</p>
<p>
<p>In the first instance, interested parties are invited to complete a pre-qualification questionnaire (PQQ) from which a short-list will be issued a full Brief and invited to submit their proposals.<br /> <br />The tender process is being run in conjunction with leading marketing agency Foundation.  Registration to receive a PQQ should be directed to Foundation via email, bearing in mind that a full briefing document will only be provided to short-listed candidates.</p>
<p>
<p>Enquiries made directly with the BACD or via any other method will not be considered for inclusion in this tender process.<br /> <br />The first deadline in the tender process is for submission of completed PQQ’s by Friday 1 April 2011.</p>
<p>
<p>Short-listed companies will be issued a full brief on or before 11 April and the BACD hopes to announce a winning tender on 1 June 2011.<br /> <br />To request a PQQ, please contact Myke Woollett, client services director at Foundation via email at bacd@foundation-mts.com <br /> <br />To explore the current BACD website, visit <a href=http://www.bacd.com>www.bacd.com</a>.</p>
<p>^1300060800^3790^Raising the profile of cosmetic den…^The British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (BACD) is dedicated to raising the profile of cosmetic dentistry in the UK.As a key part of this w…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/mouse.png<br />
Protein may improve dental implant success^
<p>Using a bone-creating protein to augment the maxillary sinus could improve dental implant success.</p>
<p>
<p>That’s according to experts at Georgia Health Sciences University.</p>
<p>
<p>Dental implants won’t work if the bone in which they are anchored is too thin – and bone thinning is a common cause and consequence following tooth loss.</p>
<p>
<p>The current favoured solution is to supplement the area with bone grafts to stabilise the implant base.</p>
<p>
<p>But that technique is problematic ‘primarily because it involves additional surgeries to harvest the bone’ explains Dr Ulf M E Wikesjö, interim associate dean for research and enterprise in the GHSU College of Dental Medicine.</p>
<p>
<p>In animal studies, he and his team, at the GHSU laboratory for applied periodontal & craniofacial regeneration, found that by implanting the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in the sinus, more new bone will form within four weeks than using conventional bone grafting at the same site.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Wikesjö says: ‘We found that BMP-induced superior bone quality over that following bone grafts, which improves the chances for successful implants.</p>
<p>
<p>‘BMP is phenomenal, because it’s a true, off-the-shelf product with ease of use that can produce real results, and it could be the new gold standard for this procedure.’</p>
<p>
<p>According to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, 69% of adults, ages 35-44, have lost at least one tooth due to decay, disease or trauma, and 26% of adults have lost all permanent teeth by age 74.</p>
<p>
<p> </p>
<p>
<p>The findings of his team’s pilot study were presented March 4 at the Academy of Osseointegration annual meeting in Washington, D C Wikesjö’s GHSU co-investigators include Drs. Jaebum Lee, Cristiano Susin, Nancy Rodriguez and Jamie de Stefano.</p>
<p>^1300060800^3791^Protein may improve dental implant …^Using a bone-creating protein to augment the maxillary sinus could improve dental implant success.That’s according to experts at Georg…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/xray.png<br />
Older women need more dental check ups^
<p>Women should increase the number of times they have a dental check up in a year once they’ve undergon the menopause.<br /> <br />This advice follows a comparison study of women on and off bone-strengthening bisphosphonate therapies for osteoporosis.<br /> <br />The study, by the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Cleveland Clinic, compares 28 post-menopausal women with 28 women on bisphosphonate therapies for at least two years or more. <br /> <br />Leena Palomo, assistant professor of periodontics from the dental school, and Maria Clarinda Beunocamino-Francisco from the Center for Specialized Women’s Health at the clinic, set out to study the long-term effects of bisphosphonate therapies on the jawbone, but instead came up with new findings that impacts on all women who are post menopause.<br /> <br />The participants of the study – between the ages of 51 and 80 – received cone beam CT scans of their jaws and a complete periodontal check for dental plaque, bleeding, and loss of bone attachment and of the alveolar bone socket.<br /> <br />Both groups of women had followed the recommended oral health standards to brush twice daily, floss and have at least two dental check ups a year.<br /> <br />The findings for bone strength and other markers for osteoporosis were similar for both groups. <br /> <br />But the researchers found both groups had increased dental plaque levels, which could endanger the jawbone of normal post-menopausal women and reverse any benefits gained in bone mass.<br /> <br />While women from both groups had similar bone health results and women on the long-term oral bone-strengthening therapies showed no signs of bone death, they had abnormal dental plaque.<br /> <br />Their findings were announced in the article, <em>Is long-term bisphosphonate therapy associated with benefits to the periodontium in postmenopausal women?</em> that was published in the February issue of Menopause.<br /> <br />Menopausal women at risk for osteoporosis also are at risk for periodontal disease, which affects bone that anchors teeth, says Professor Palomo. <br /> <br />A prior study showed that short-term use of bisphosphonates had increased bone density in the jaw.<br /> <br />But over time, if the plaque is left on teeth, it obviously triggers the processes for gum disease. <br /> <br />If that bone loss isn’t stopped, Professor Palomo said, a woman could potentially lose her teeth.<br /> <br />She added that those cytokines also set in motion the process that weakens bones in osteoporosis.<br /> <br />Professor Palomo said women may need to see the dentist as many as four times a year to control dental plaque by deep periodontal cleanings.<br /> <br />‘Women also have to realise that bone disease and gum disease are two separate diseases,’ Professor Palomo said. <br /> <br />The bisphosphonate therapy isn’t enough to keep jawbones strong and healthy, she added, that means getting rid of the dental plaque.<br /> <br /><strong>Journal reference</strong><br />Leena Palomo, Maria Clarinda A. Buencamino-Francisco, John J. Carey, Mala Sivanandy, Holly Thacker. <em>Is long-term bisphosphonate therapy associated with benefits to the periodontium in postmenopausal women?</em> Menopause, 2011; 18 (2): 164-170 DOI: 10.1097/gme.0b013e3181e8e2a2</p>
<p>^1300060800^3792^Older women need more dental check …^Women should increase the number of times they have a dental check up in a year once they’ve undergon the menopause. This advice follow…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/yfs009.jpg<br />
Fellowship for dental dean^
<p>Professor Elizabeth Kay, Dean of the Peninsula Dental School, has been awarded Fellowship Ad Eundem of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) (FGDP(UK)) at The Royal College of Surgeons of England.</p>
<p>
<p>She received her award at the Annual Faculty of GDPs (UK) Diplomates Ceremony in London on 5 March 2011.</p>
<p>
<p>The award of Fellowship is the highest accolade a member of the FGDP(UK) can achieve.</p>
<p>
<p>It is a mark of achievement for those who have made a contribution to patient care or the profession of primary dental care, significantly over and above what might be reasonably expected of a member of the FGDP(UK).</p>
<p>
<p>Russ Ladwa, Dean of the FGDP(UK), says: ‘It is obvious to all to see that Professor Kay has an exceptional enthusiasm for her profession, and a willingness to help others along their chosen path.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Her tireless work and support for dental practitioners to provide an improved quality of care for their patients is well known and I thank Professor Kay for that.’</p>
<p>
<p>Professor Kay adds: ‘I am of course delighted to have been awarded such a prestigious accolade. While it is me who has been made a Fellow, it is an achievement that reflects the hard work and dedication of my colleagues and our students at the Peninsula Dental School, as much as it does me personally.’</p>
<p>^1300060800^3793^Fellowship for dental dean^Professor Elizabeth Kay, Dean of the Peninsula Dental School, has been awarded Fellowship Ad Eundem of the Faculty of General Dental Practic…^<br />
Mum’s diet can lead diabetes for offspring^
<p>New research shows a poor diet during pregnancy can have a negative effect on the baby’s long-term health.</p>
<p>
<p>According to scientists at the University of Cambridge, children born to mothers who had an unhealthy diet during pregnancy are more prone to type 2 diabetes later in life.</p>
<p>
<p>The study establishes a link between the regulation of Hnf4a, a gene linked to type 2 diabetes, and a mother’s diet during pregnancy.</p>
<p>
<p>Prior research has shown that Hnf4a has a role in the development of the pancreas and the production of insulin, and scientists thought that a mother’s diet during pregnancy has a far-reaching influence on the gene, affecting its expression later in a child’s life.</p>
<p>
<p>The idea that environmental factors, such as diet, affect genes throughout life is a proven fact, and the reason behind these effects is epigenetics: modifications to DNA that control how much of a gene is produced.</p>
<p>
<p>To test their theory, researchers altered the protein content of rats’ diets during pregnancy to cause their offspring to develop type 2 diabetes in old age.</p>
<p>
<p>When studying cells from the pancreas of the offspring of both well-nourished and malnourished mothers, researchers found the Hnf4a gene was expressed far less in the offspring prone to type 2 diabetes.</p>
<p>
<p>Though the amount of Hnf4a decreased with age in both groups of rats, when scientists studied the rats’ DNA, they found the aging-related decrease in Hnf4a to be far more pronounced in rats whose mothers had poor diets during pregnancy.</p>
<p>
<p>The scientists then studied DNA from the pancreas cells in humans and proved the expression of Hnf4a in humans is controlled the same way as in rats. Therefore, in humans as well as rats, a decreased amount of Hnf4a leads to a decrease in pancreatic function, impacting its ability to produce insulin.</p>
<p>
<p>Basically, a decrease in Hnf4a means an increase in the risk of diabetes.</p>
<p>
<p>Professor Jeremy Pearson, associate medical director at the British Heart Foundation, says: ‘We already know that a healthy pregnancy is important in shaping a child’s health… The reasons why are not well understood, but this study in rats adds to the evidence that a mother’s diet may sometimes alter the control of certain genes in her unborn child. This research doesn’t change our advice that pregnant women should try to eat a healthy, balanced diet.’</p>
<p>^1300060800^3794^Mum’s diet can lead diabetes for …^New research shows a poor diet during pregnancy can have a negative effect on the baby’s long-term health.According to scientists at t…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/pregnant-spot.jpg<br />
Pink gums, white teeth and no more dental blues ^
<p>Gum health through effective plaque control is just one of the many beneficial features of the newly launched Oral-B Pro-Expert toothpaste.</p>
<p>
<p>Incorporating stabilised stannous fluoride Oral-B Pro-Expert toothpaste provides powerful, long lasting antimicrobial action which fights plaque and consequently gum problems as well as caries.</p>
<p>
<p>Additionally, the antimicrobial properties also guard against oral malodour while other properties of the stannous fluoride help protect against dentinal hypersensitivity stabilised stannous fluoride delivers long-lasting anti-bacterial benefits and is recognised as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent.</p>
<p>
<p>Laboratory and clinical studies have confirmed its ability to inhibit bacterial growth, reduce the ability of bacteria to ‘stick’ to tooth and gum surfaces and to affect their metabolic processes. Indeed, the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs has recognised stannous fluoride as meeting its ADA Seal of Acceptance requirements for anti-caries, antibacterial and gum health efficacy.</p>
<p>
<p>But the gum health benefits do not stop there, thanks to the other newly-matched co-ingredient in the all-in-one Oral-B Pro-Expert toothpaste, polyphosphate.</p>
<p>
<p>This polymer protects against calculus formation (as well as staining) thereby reducing a further cause of plaque retention on the roughened surface of the calculus.</p>
<p>
<p>The duo of plaque reduction agents acts as a proven, powerful force for good gum health.</p>
<p>^1300060800^3796^Pink gums, white teeth and no more …^Gum health through effective plaque control is just one of the many beneficial features of the newly launched Oral-B Pro-Expert toothpaste.I…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Biting-apple.jpg<br />
A lifetime of smiles^
<p>While regular visits to the dentist are an essential part of dental care, be sure to take care of your teeth and gums between appointments.</p>
<p>
<p>Plaque is forming on your teeth all the time but you can avoid its negative effects by brushing and flossing regularly. Here are some tips for good oral care: </p>
<p>• Brush your teeth twice a day <br />• Be sure to use a toothpaste that contains fluoride to protect against cavities <br />• Floss at least once a day <br />• A mouth rinse can help freshen breath and control plaque bacteria <br />• Change your brush (or brush head) every three months</p>
<p>For the best dental care, brushing with a power brush is a great step forward.</p>
<p>
<p>While a power toothbrush can’t replace professional tooth cleaning it can help keep your teeth feeling clean and smooth between dental appointments and many power brushes remove up to twice as much plaque as a manual toothbrush. </p>
<p>With a variety of technologies available to ensure that you brush each section of your teeth for the right amount of time and apply just the right amount of pressure, power brushes will help you get top marks for technique. </p>
<p><strong>Care at every age</strong><br />Different types of dental care are needed at different ages. Kids’ teeth are particularly prone to decay.</p>
<p>
<p>A healthy diet shouldn’t be underestimated and encouraging kids to eat a variety of foods while cutting down on sugary snacks will reduce the likelihood of cavities.</p>
<p>
<p>A range of both manual and power brushes are available to suit every age group and brushing with a good toothpaste twice a day is essential. </p>
<p>When children move into their teens and grow increasingly conscious of their appearance, parents can continue to help them to care for their teeth by reminding them that a healthy smile and fresh breath will keep them looking and feeling their best. </p>
<p>As people age, they may lose teeth due to decay or gum disease and some may need to have dentures fitted. Advances in denture care mean that this is no longer the scary prospect it once was. If dentures are needed, your dentist will ensure best fit. <br /> <br />As well as following a thorough dental health routine, using products that are specifically designed with your needs in mind will help keep dental treatments at bay.</p>
<p>^1300060800^3795^A lifetime of smiles^While regular visits to the dentist are an essential part of dental care, be sure to take care of your teeth and gums between appointments.P…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/lifetime.jpg<br />
Smile makeover costs Liam Gallagher £7,000^
<p>Liam Gallagher has has £7,000 worth of cosmetic dentistry to correct his crooked smile.</p>
<p>
<p>That’s according to a news report at <a href=http://www.mirror.co.uk>www.mirror.co.uk</a>.</p>
<p>
<p>The new story reports: ‘The 38-year-old snaggletoothed Manc, who is currently promoting his new band Beady Eye, was ordered by management to get himself to a dentist – and pronto.</p>
<p>‘Several hours of heavy-duty drilling later, and the singer emerged, puffy-mouthed and dribbling slightly, with a brand-new Hollywood smile. A snip at £7,000.’</p>
<p>Beady Eye marks Liam’s musical comeback, it reports.</p>
<p>It adds that the singer-songwriter ‘knows his teeth have never been his strong point, so he decided now was the time to get them done. Liam had a place recommended to him, and booked in for a consultation. A few weeks later, he went for it, having his grey fillings replaced with white ones, and some veneers put in for a more even look.</p>
<p>‘His new gnashers are a lot more American-friendly too so if Beady Eye do try and conquer the States, at least it won’t be his awful teeth they’re talking about.’</p>
<p>
<p>Nine years ago, he had emergency surgery to repair his two front teeth after he was smashed in the mouth in a bar in Munich.</p>
<p>
<p>And he’s not the first in his family to undergo cosmetic dentistry procedures.</p>
<p>His brother, Noel, with whom he is no longer speaking post-Oasis fall-out, has already had treatment on his teeth.</p>
<p>For more celeb news, click <a href=http://www.mirror.co.uk/celebs/news/2011/03/15/liam-gallagher-coughs-up-7-000-for-cosmetic-dentistry-work-115875-22990288/>here</a>.</p>
<p>^1300147200^3800^Smile makeover costs Liam Gallagher…^Liam Gallagher has has £7,000 worth of cosmetic dentistry to correct his crooked smile.That’s according to a news report at www.mirror…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Beady-Eye-Bring-The-Light.jpg<br />
Relief for tooth sensitivity^
<p>Oral-B’s new all-in-one Pro-Expert toothpaste is set to bring relief to thousands of dentine hypersensitivity suffers, thanks to its inclusion of stabilised stannous fluoride.<br /> <br />While reducing hypersensitivity is just one of the comprehensive range of oral health benefits delivered by Oral-B Pro-Expert toothpaste, for people who experience this painful condition it will probably be enough by itself!<br /> <br />Experienced by a wide cross-section of the population, most notably when eating or drinking cold food and drinks or taking a gasp of cold air, hypersensitivity is caused by nerves which are stimulated in the dentine layer of teeth exposed by tooth wear or periodontal disease.</p>
<p>
<p>Stabilised stannous fluoride, researched in both laboratory and clinical studies acts by partially or completely blocking the tiny tubules of which dentine is composed.<br /> <br />As a multi-benefit dentifrice, the all-in-one oral health advantages of Oral-B Pro-Expert toothpaste are not only clearly understandable for professionals.</p>
<p>
<p>Patients who suffer from hypersensitivity will soon also appreciate its advantages in relieving this condition through advanced technological research.</p>
<p>
<p>By improving gum health and helping to reduce the risk of erosion, Pro-Expert toothpaste will also help guard against the causes of sensitivity for future peace of mind.</p>
<p>^1300060800^3797^Relief for tooth sensitivity^Oral-B’s new all-in-one Pro-Expert toothpaste is set to bring relief to thousands of dentine hypersensitivity suffers, thanks to its i…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Pro-expert-(tube).jpg<br />
Teenager sees the magic of dental braces^
<p>For 16-year old Paisley Laws, having orthodontic braces was not the only challenge she faced when she started her course of treatment in 2007.</p>
<p>
<p>Paisley has cerebral palsy, a condition in which impairment to the immature brain affects movement, posture and co-ordination.</p>
<p>
<p>In Paisley’s case the condition affects her lower limbs, meaning that her balance is poor and she walks slightly differently.</p>
<p>
<p>Despite having two operations to improve her walking while going through her course of orthodontic treatment she persevered with her braces.<br /> <br /><strong>Well won praise</strong><br />Paisley’s treatment lasted just under 16 months and though that seemed to her like a long time, as she says, ‘every visit was worth it’.</p>
<p>
<p>Prior to having braces Paisley had an overjet, which meant her upper teeth and jaw protruded over her lower jaw.</p>
<p>
<p>She was subsequently very conscious of her teeth and hated how they looked.</p>
<p>
<p>Her new straight teeth and stunning smile has made a real difference, as Paisley sums it up ‘I love my teeth now, and my friends and family often comment on how good they look. This gives me a lot more confidence than before I had my treatment’.</p>
<p>
<p>Paisley is equally rapturous about Dr Jonathan Hunter, the orthodontist who performed the treatment, and his team at York Orthodontics: ‘It feels like Jonathan’s worked with magic and I can’t thank him and his team enough.’</p>
<p>

<p>
<hr />
<p></p>
<p>
<p>Pasiley Laws was a finalist in Against the Odds, a competition conceived by the British Orthodontic Society  (BOS), which represents the dental specialty of orthodontics; the  science and art of correcting irregularities of the teeth, bite and  jaws.</p>
<p>
<p>Sara Wallis, feature writer of the <em>Daily Mirror</em>, was one of the judges of the competition and explains that choosing Paisley as one of the winners from amongst the many patients who entered was an easy decision to reach.</p>
<p>
<p>She says: ‘We were so impressed with her bravery and enthusiasm in persevering with orthodontic treatment at a time she was undergoing a number of difficult medical operations.’</p>
<p>
<p>Psychologist Professor Tim Newton, another one of the judges, added: ‘Paisley exemplifies the spirit of the competition, which was to show people that people can achieve their goals against the odds.’<br /> <br />For more on the British Orthodontic Society  (BOS), visit <a href=http://www.bos.org.uk>www.bos.org.uk</a>.<cite></cite><span id=search><span class=f><cite><br /></cite></span></span></p>
<p>^1300060800^3799^Teenager sees the magic of dental b…^For 16-year old Paisley Laws, having orthodontic braces was not the only challenge she faced when she started her course of treatment in 200…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Paisley-Laws.jpg<br />
CRB ‘fiasco’ delays dentists’ CQC registration^
<p>The British Dental Association (BDA) has renewed its call on the government to delay the deadline for dental practices to be registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC).</p>
<p>
<p>This is so that problems with the registration process can be resolved.</p>
<p>
<p>The BDA has written to secretary of state for health, Andrew Lansley, informing him of significant new problems with verification of dentists’ CRB checks.</p>
<p>
<p>It could mean thousands of practitioners are unlikely to be regarded by CQC as satisfying its requirements by the end of March deadline, despite doing all they have been asked to and having the appropriate check in place.</p>
<p>
<p>The BDA’s letter, which highlighted the severe inconvenience and stress many dentists are facing, included a copy of correspondence sent to CQC chief executive, Cynthia Bower, last week, protesting at a new debacle with the registration process.</p>
<p>
<p>This willl see thousands of dentists notified this week that CQC has been unable to obtain countersigned Criminal Records Bureau checks from primary care trusts.</p>
<p>
<p>Many dentists will now have to obtain a new form and have it verified at a Crown post office, the BDA understands.</p>
<p>
<p>Dr Susie Sanderson, chair of the BDA’s executive board, said: ‘CQC registration is a fiasco that seems to lurch from one crisis to another, spreading discontent, creating stress and distracting practitioners from patient care.</p>
<p>
<p>‘It is disappointing, although sadly no longer surprising, that the process has now been pitched into a new crisis. CQC clearly needs time to get the process on track.</p>
<p>
<p>She adds: ‘The dental profession in England is engaging constructively with the government on major changes to contracts and commissioning to help it deliver improvements to patient care. It is important that positive approach is reciprocated.</p>
<p>
<p>‘The government has previously refused BDA calls to exempt dentists from CQC registration and even to delay the process, arguing that it is progressing well. That is clearly not the case. It is time for government to take action to show that it understands the profession’s concerns and halt the development of a crisis of confidence among dentists across England.’</p>
<p>^1300060800^3798^CRB ‘fiasco’ delays dentists’ CQC r…^The British Dental Association (BDA) has renewed its call on the government to delay the deadline for dental practices to be registered with…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/filesa-z.jpg<br />
University’s dentist kit gets investors’ backing^
<p>A medical emergencies kit designed for dentists by a university team has just received a cash injection from local investors.</p>
<p>Dentistry equipment business, ResusPod is a spin-out from the University of Leeds and has just launched its products to market after receiving investment from business angels.</p>
<p>Following a presentation at a Yorkshire Association of Business Angels (YABA) event in September 2010, ResusPod was offered investment by Paul Smith and Tim Ward.</p>
<p>The company’s products provide dentists with medicines, equipment and training to manage medical emergencies.</p>
<p>Business angel, Paul Smith, says that he and co-investor Tim Ward believe ResusPod has the potential to make a huge impact in the dentistry sector.</p>
<p>
<p>Along with finance, the pair is providing hands-on advice and assistance. </p>
<p>He says: ‘The product has massive potential. Tim and I both have experience of compliance-orientated markets and we felt we could help this business both in terms of investment, but also with our knowledge.’</p>
<p>ResusPod was founded by Kathryn Taylor and Julie Burke who are dentists, oral surgeons and academics at Leeds Dental Institute. </p>
<p>The company’s business manager, Mal Jarmolowicz, says: ‘We’ve spent a number of months setting up a commercial deal with a specialist manufacturer and the time is right to launch the product. </p>
<p>‘We’re particularly keen to launch now because regulations which come into force in April this year make it mandatory for dental care professionals to have emergency medical training and equipment in place.’</p>
<p>‘Tim and Paul really understand the compliance issues that we – and our market – are facing and it’s this, along with the incredible back-office support they’re providing to us, that made them such a good match for ResusPod.’</p>
<p>The ResusPod offer covers all the requirements of the new regulations, including medicines in tamper-evident containers and specialist infection control materials.</p>
<p>
<p><img src=/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/ResusPod.jpg alt=

ResusPod customers are supported through a sophisticated inventory management system that will provide them with new medicines/equipment as and when required.

The product had its official launch at the Dentistry Show on 4 March.

YABA has been supported by regional development agency Yorkshire Forward and over the last ten years has been involved in £21 million of investment in companies across the region, creating more than 300 jobs.

James Farrar, assistant director of Business at Yorkshire Forward comments: ‘YABA is a unique regional forum which helps new and expanding businesses access the additional funding and expertise to reach their full potential. It’s great to see businesses like ResusPod benefit from this service and adding to its already significant success.’

^1300233600^3804^University’s dentist kit gets inv…^A medical emergencies kit designed for dentists by a university team has just received a cash injection from local investors.Dentistry equip…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/ResusPod-Team.jpg
Dentist calls time on pub^

A new NHS dentist is to open its doors to 3,000 Stoke-on-Trent patients on 1 April – in an old pub.

The dental practice, run by Primecare Oral Health Services Limited, will replace the former New Phoenix pub on Liverpool Road, Stoke.

The new NHS dentist will be more than welcome in an area where many struggle to afford dental care.

It will provide a range of NHS services including checks-ups, full courses of treatment and oral health promotion.

The practice will open five days a week, Mondays to Fridays, from 8am to 6pm.

Two dentists and a team of dental nurses will be working at the practice which has been set up in the converted premises of the former New Phoenix pub, in the heart of the town.

NHS Stoke on Trent planning manager, Jeanette Sims, said: ‘Stoke-on-Trent has one of the worst rates for decayed teeth in the West Midlands region and indeed the country so we need to do all we can to improve people’s access to NHS dentistry in the city. The new practice in Stoke will help us do that.’

Sarah Campbell, operational director for Primecare Oral Health Services Limited, said: ‘We are really pleased to be opening this new NHS dental facility in Stoke, in partnership with NHS Stoke on Trent. The practice will make it easier for people to get access to dental care they need and improve their oral health.’

Patients can register – and start to book appointments – at the new practice now by calling the dedicated registrations line on 0330 123 9134.

For more information you can also visit www.liverpoolroaddental.co.uk.

^1300147200^3803^Dentist calls time on pub^A new NHS dentist is to open its doors to 3,000 Stoke-on-Trent patients on 1 April – in an old pub.The dental practice, run by Primeca…^
Supermarkets support diet and alcohol misuse plan^

Health secretary Andrew Lansley unveiled signatories to the first phase of the Responsibility Deal which will tackle poor diet and alcohol misuse.

Working in partnership with members of the voluntary sector, business, industry and the retail sector, the Deal can deliver faster and better results than a regulatory route, which is not always available.

Since September, five groups working on food, alcohol, behavioural change, physical activity and health at work have developed a series of pledges for action.

Key collective pledges agreed include:

• Calories on menus from September this year
• Reducing salt in food so people eat 1g less per day by the end of 2012
• Removal of artificial trans-fats by the end of this year
• Achieving clear unit labelling on more than 80% of alcohol by 2013
• Increasing physical activity through the workplace
• Improving workplace health.

Supermarkets including ASDA, the Co-operative, Morrisons, Marks & Spencer, Sainbury’s, Tesco and Waitrose are among more than 170 organisations which have signed up to a broad range of measures designed to help the public to be more healthy.

Fast food outlets including McDonald’s, Pizza Hut and KFC have pledged to remove trans-fats and to put in place calorie labelling.

Drink producers and retailers, including Diageo, Carlsberg, Majestic Wine and Constellation, the producer of well-know brands including Hardys, Echo Falls and Stowells, have pledged to provide clear unit labelling, support awareness campaigns and develop a new sponsorship code on responsible drinking.

Key individual pledges include: The Association of Convenience Stores has committed to work with its members to roll out Change4Life branding into 1,000 stores to improve fruit and vegetable availability in deprived areas.

Andrew Lansley said: ‘Public health is everyone’s responsibility and there is a role for all of us, working in partnership, to tackle these challenges.

‘We know that regulation is costly, can take years and is often only determined at an EU-wide level anyway. That’s why we have to introduce new ways of achieving better results.

‘The deals published today, demonstrate the effectiveness of our radical partnership approach to deliver more and sooner.

‘And it is only the first step. While I’m pleased with the progress we have achieved in seven months and that over 170 organisations have already signed up as partners, we want more organisations to sign up, and also to work with us to develop further collective and individual pledges.

‘These deals will work alongside the Department’s broader plans to take a bold new approach to public health. Public Health England will give local people the money and the power to improve our nation’s health. The money will be ringfenced to be used as it should be — for preventing ill health.’

 

^1300147200^3802^Supermarkets support diet and alcoh…^Health secretary Andrew Lansley unveiled signatories to the first phase of the Responsibility Deal which will tackle poor diet and alcohol m…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/apple.jpg
Second-hand smoke may be a cavity risk^

People who inhale second-hand smoke may be at a higher risk from cavities.

That’s according to a study led by Dr Taru Kinnunen, director of the Tobacco Dependence Treatment and Research Programme at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

Dr Kinnunen said that altought the study was still in its infancy, it found that second-hand smoke caused an increase in risk of cavities because smoke still entered the nasal cavities and the mouth – and, as a result, saliva was impacted.

The premise of the study is that when children are subjected to passive smoke, there is a rise in the number of cavities.

With around 21% of the UK’s population still smoking, the risk of developing mouth cancer, the fifth most common cancer in the UK, is a growing concern amongst those in the dental profession.

Dr Nigel Carter, chief executive of the British Dental Health Foundation, says: ‘When you consider that your mouth and teeth are susceptible to the effects of the 4,000 or so chemicals contained in cigarettes, it is encouraging to know two thirds of people who do smoke want to give up.

‘Many people are now aware of the dangers smoking can cause, including tooth staining, dental plaque, bad breath, tooth loss and gum disease, which has been linked to serious medical problems and fatal heart and lung diseases. The habit has also been linked to premature and low birth weight babies.’

Tobacco is the most likely cause of mouth cancer, linked to around three-quarters of all cases of a disease that kills one person every five hours in the UK.

With new cases occurring all the time, many people still remain unaware of the risk smoking poses.
Dr Carter says: ‘The dental profession is in a unique position to warn patients of the risks and consequences of smoking.’

^1300233600^3805^Second-hand smoke may be a cavity r…^People who inhale second-hand smoke may be at a higher risk from cavities.That’s according to a study led by Dr Taru Kinnunen, directo…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/exhale.jpg
Dental company gears up for charity bike ride^

A team from dental equipment company, A-dec, is peddling for charity in the infamous Coast2Coast bike ride this month.

The route – across the Pennines from Whitehaven to Tynemouth – covers 150 miles over three days and the cyclists are raising funds for dental charity, Bridge2Aid, as well as other UK fundraising organsations.
 
Bridge2Aid is A-dec’s partner charity that carries out oral health care work in the Mwanza region in Tanzania.

The team includes Charlotte Cligg and her partner Ben, Jo Gamble, Stacey Roberts, Tracey McCulloch and husband David, Brian Anderson and wife Sarah, Ashley Woodruff, Ciaran Hynes, and Charlie Cope.
 
They will be supported by Sarah Treble and Eugene O’Malley who all hope to complete the bike ride, setting out on 29 April.
 
Their target is to raise more than £7,500 for Bridge2Aid, NSPCC, MS Society, Breast Cancer Campaign and Leukaemia & Lymphoma Research.

Bridge2Aid work in Tanzania, providing access to emergency dentistry – the largest but most under-resourced healthcare need – in the rural areas and work with the disabled and people affected by leprosy at Bukumbi Care Centre.
 
A-dec have had a close supporting relationship with Bridge2Aid for many years, offering equipment donations and raising funds for the charity in various events and tasks.

You can support A-dec’s team of cyclists by sponsoring them. Click here to make a donation.

^1300233600^3806^Dental company gears up for charity…^A team from dental equipment company, A-dec, is peddling for charity in the infamous Coast2Coast bike ride this month.The route – acro…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Team-A-dec-in-training.jpg
Musical instruments strike toxic note for hygiene ^

A US study reveals that musical instruments are a breeding ground for disease.

Researchers at the Oklahoma State University examined brass and woodwind instruments shared by school students and found they were germ-laden and acted as potential ‘reservoirs of disease’.

Micro-organisms linked to asthma, skin infections and other illnesses and allergies were found on 13 instruments used by a high school band.

These findings were reported in a study published in the March/April issue of the journal, General Dentistry.

More than half of the instruments, which included clarinets, trombones, trumpets, saxophones and oboes, hadn’t even been used in the previous month.

While the study was small, it struck a sour note for disease transmission, said lead author Dr R Thomas Glass, professor of forensic sciences, pathology and dental medicine; adjunct professor of microbiology at Oklahoma State University Health Sciences Center.

Researchers took swabs from 117 sites on mouthpieces, internal chambers and cases. They found: • 442 different bacteria, including species of staphylococcus
• 58 types of mould and 19 yeasts (similar to those often found on dentures, athletic mouthguards and toothbrushes).

While most contamination was in reeds and mouthpieces, there were enough microbes at midpoints and opposite ends of the instruments to transmit illnesses and expose the musicians to toxins, the study found.

According to anecdotal reports from the teacher, half the band students at any given time had experienced respiratory ailments like asthma or bronchitis.

Dr Glass says he doesn’t want to alarm parents or discourage music participation, but ‘we want them to be aware that musical instruments can transmit diseases’, even after long periods without being played.

He says players should take apart their instruments each week and wipe with a damp cloth to remove the biofilm that acts as a breeding ground for germs.

Music stores also sell chemical dips that can be used to sanitise.

He also recommends sterilising an instrument with ethylene oxide every time it is passed along to a new player, which can be done at music shops various industrial sterilisation facilities.

If it is only used by one player, sterilise once a year, or if the child experiences recurrent infections.

^1300233600^3807^Musical instruments strike toxic no…^A US study reveals that musical instruments are a breeding ground for disease.Researchers at the Oklahoma State University examined brass an…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/trumpet.jpg
Time for a dental spring clean^

It’s time to get clean. If you’ve been hunkered down for the winter, get ready to start your Spring cleaning. Now is the time to get your house in order and spruced up for the new season. Sweep out the cobwebs and dirt from Old Man Winter’s vacation at your home.

Now that all that snow and cold weather is moving on to warmer temps, you can feel refreshed.  Your house should reflect an invigorated spirit for spring, and you’ll feel much better about how clean everything looks and feels. As well, you’ll want to start making a checklist of all your healthcare and dental needs to get checked out.

If you have been taking care of your teeth and gums during the winter months, it’s time to go see your favourite dental practitioner for a spring cleaning for your smile.

At least twice per year is the recommendation by most all dentists to get a check-up, and the best time is now before your year gets too far along. If you have a busy social season that is beginning and have travel plans for the summer, now is the time for a dental cleaning and check-up before you get too busy.

Plus, you’ll want to have a beautiful smile for all those parties, proms, and beach excursions you’ll be going to this year.

It is important for your health and appearance to look after your teeth, so affordable dental insurance is a sensible precaution, according to MoneySupermarket.com.

Dental insurance is becoming a necessity in everyday life due to the increased costs of visiting the dentist. Even routine check-ups can be costly. For many people, it is getting increasingly difficult to find a dentist who will provide treatment on the NHS, whilst using a private practice can prove expensive.

With dental insurance you can claim for treatment whether you choose to go privately or via the NHS. Private dental insurance contributes towards routine treatment, dental emergencies and serious dental problems.

But you need to take care of your teeth and gums.

According to the British Dental Association, people may be putting off getting dental treatment due to financial worries. It’s understandable that, at a time when there is widespread concern about household finances, some patients’ financial anxieties are leading them to defer dental appointments and treatment.

 width=370 height=250 /></p>
<p>
<p>Achieving short-term money savings at the expense of longer-term health problems really isn’t wise though.</p>
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<p>Neglecting your oral health can increase both the complexity of the problems you face and the cost of the treatment you must eventually have.</p>
<p>
<p>As well, visiting the dentist at appropriate intervals will ensure that you get the help you need to maintain good oral health. Leaving it could make the situation worse, causing more damage to their oral health and resulting in greater costs in the long term. You need a dental service that helps maintain good oral health and prevents decay, rather than one that is based solely on treatment.</p>
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<p>Research reveals that private dental prices can vary by hundreds of pounds, and it’s not always easy to know what’s included in the consultation or to get the clear pricing information you need to shop around.</p>
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<p>According to Which, private dental practices’ prices can vary wildly – from £45 to £124 for an initial check-up and £250 to £518 for a crown. Plus, patients need to question what’s included in an initial check-up – only 56% of practices in a survey included the cost of an X-ray and just 19% a scale and polish. It’s also good practice for dentists to give patients a treatment plan and cost estimate before work begins. Here are two good tips when shopping around for dental treatment:<br />• When you book your check-up, ask what will be included in the cost. <br />• If a price seems particularly high, question it.</p>
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<p>Eighty percent of people don’t shop around for dental treatment and over one in four of individuals getting a mixture of NHS and private treatment didn’t know which was which – you can always ask for a breakdown of what you’re getting.</p>
<p>
<p>Of course, you shouldn’t just jump at the first dental plan you come across. They do vary a lot and since you will pay a monthly premium for them you should think about what you can afford and what you would get in return.</p>
<p>
<p>A good dental plan must be easy to understand and it should clearly explain the benefits to you upfront, according to Dencover. Many dental plans enable you to claim back the cost of check ups as well as treatments of various kinds.</p>
<p>
<p>But there are usually upper limits, and these are determined by the level of premium you will pay. Shop around so you can compare dental insurance plans and figure out what one looks the best to you. Make sure you read all the small print to see what the exclusions and limitations are. This way you won’t get caught out by thinking you have got one thing when actually you have something else.</p>
<p>Also, if your looking to save money on dental procedures and a dental program costs, you can always consider a discount dental membership like the scheme offered at over 1,000 locations in the UK through Healthy Discounts sponsored by Munroe Sutton.</p>
<p>
<p>For only a few pounds per month, you can save money with dentists who provide immediate savings on dental work; and you can even combine it with a cash plan from you employer if you have additional money to use for dental care to further stretch your savings. </p>
<p>By practising good dental hygiene techniques, you will maintain healthy teeth and a great smile. So, for great spring cleaning to get those winter time cobwebs out of your mouth, here are some great tips to get your smile ready to rock: <br />1. Brushing: Make sure you brush your teeth after each meal <br />2. Daily dental routine: Get into a routine of brushing and flossing your teeth daily. Make sure you brush your teeth at least twice a day. A good time to brush your teeth is in the morning and at night<br />3. Flossing: Make sure to floss at least once a day<br />4. Effective toothbrushes that get positive eesults: The best type of toothbrush to use is a soft, rounded toothbrush that is not to big because you want to make sure that you brush all areas of your teeth and mouth<br />5. Get rid of the old and bring in the new: Remember to replace your toothbrush every 3 to 4 months<br />6. Electronic toothbrushes: You can use an electric toothbrush if you prefer. Research suggests that powered toothbrushes with a rotating brush that moves back-and-forth are better to use than other types of toothbrushes. As an insurance company, we would prefer everyone to be using the best toothbrush they can afford<br />7. Use fluoride: Always brush with toothpaste that contains fluoride. Toothpaste that contains tarter control is good toothpaste to purchase because tarter control toothpaste will help slow down any mineral buildup developing on your teeth. <br />8. Hold your toothbrush the right way: When you brush try holding your toothbrush in a position that will not only brush your teeth, but brush the gums well too. While you brush your teeth, move the brush back and forth brushing your teeth in a circular motion. Brush softly not hard, because you can make hurt your gums and damage your tooth enamel. <br />9. Brush your entire mouth not just your teeth: Brush all tongue and the surfaces of your cheek. Make sure you brush your front and back teeth the best. <br />10. Cleaning your tongue is just as important as cleaning your teeth: Brush your tongue after you brush your teeth. Brushing your tongue helps remove plaque, which can cause your breath to smell bad and you, can also develop bacteria in your mouth if you do not brush your tongue along with your teeth.</p>
<p>
<p>Spring cleaning helps make all things new again. Give your smile a chance to do the same. You’ll be glad you did. And your family, friends, and co-workers will appreciate how great you look.</p>
<p>^1300320000^3808^Time for a dental spring clean^It’s time to get clean. If you’ve been hunkered down for the winter, get ready to start your Spring cleaning. Now is the time to…^<br />
Bryan Robson battling throat cancer^
<p>The former Manchester United and England captain, Bryan Robson, is battling throat cancer.</p>
<p>
<p>Robson, 54, who is currently Thailand’s national team manager, underwent an operation to remove a tumour from his throat on 3 March in a Bangkok hospital, a United spokesman confirmed.</p>
<p>
<p>A laboratory report revealed a cancerous tumour that will need further treatment, according to the Manchester Evening News.</p>
<p>
<p>The spokesman added that surgeons were ‘confident’ the condition could be treated.</p>
<p>
<p>They added: ‘At this moment, Bryan is fine to continue with his role as Thailand coach and his role as ambassador of Manchester United.</p>
<p>
<p>‘Bryan and family have requested that he can continue with his treatment in private and ask that their privacy is respected.’</p>
<p>
<p>Robson, a hero at Old Trafford, joined United in 1981, making 345 appearances and helping the club to two Premier League titles, three FA Cups and the European Cup Winners’ Cup.</p>
<p>^1300320000^3809^Bryan Robson battling throat cancer^The former Manchester United and England captain, Bryan Robson, is battling throat cancer.Robson, 54, who is currently Thailand’s national t…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/Bryan_Robson_616785.jpg<br />
News feature: Can I quote you on that? ^
<p>Hitting the local headlines for all the right reasons and actually making an impact in the minds of reporters, let alone readers, can be a very difficult thing.</p>
<p>
<p>Let’s face it, when it comes to getting column inches in the local ‘rag’, it’s an uphill battle for dentists and other companies, unless there is a dedicated business page.</p>
<p>
<p>The problem with that is a business page is just downright bland and boring and not many people are bothered about reading it without having a specific reason.</p>
<p>
<p>Local newspapers are very much centred on local bread-and-butter news stories. These include anything to do with the likes of councils, community groups, crusades and crowd-pleasing and heart-warming stories.</p>
<p>
<p>That doesn’t leave a lot of space for much else. So the question is how to you get into that space?</p>
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<p><strong>Blatant advertising</strong><br />One big hint; reporters can see straight through press releases and stories that are just there to be blatant advertising for the company or dentist.</p>
<p>
<p>Let’s face it, a dentist is a business, and when a business is trying to get into a paper there is an element of self-publicising.</p>
<p>
<p>One way to ingratiate yourself with a paper is to put your money where your mouth is and spend some cash on actually advertising.</p>
<p>
<p>If you are a regular advertiser, then the editorial team are more likely to give you some space for stories.</p>
<p>
<p>As the saying goes, ‘you scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours’.</p>
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<p>Leading cosmetic dentistry and surgery website – <a href=http://www.myfacemybody.com>www.myfacemybody.com</a> –<cite></cite><span id=search><span class=f><cite></cite></span></span> works with both local and national newspapers to get the word out about the latest treatments and advancements.</p>
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<p>It has worked hard to build relationships with different media outlets, and that is something that has to be done and it takes time, effort and is not an overnight thing.</p>
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<p><strong>Top tips and handy hints</strong><br />Following a few simple rules and hints will help dentists with the local press and harness their power for themselves.</p>
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<p>These include:<br />• Build up a relationship with one specific reporter, this creates a bond and means that you are not going backwards and forwards with anonymous faces and names all the time.  <br />• The sob story – as is proven with television programmes like <em>The X-Factor</em>, sob stories sell well. Any patient who has had their lives changed because of a treatment could be a potential story.<br />• A story which is blatantly advertising is never going to get any more than a few paragraphs in a local paper because reporters can see through these.<br />• Offer your services free of charge to become a local expert that can be called upon for certain stories if needed.<br />• Do not become a media tart – sending too many press releases or getting in touch too much can just be a little boring: pace yourself.</p>
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<p>This advice is something that myfacemybody.com takes on board, which means that it gets the message out there that it wants to and helps publicise its brand.</p>
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<p>The information resource acts as something to help the media and also potential customers, so this works in its favour.</p>
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<p><strong>Make the most of the local media</strong><br />The local media is a useful tool that, if harnessed in the right way, can work out well for all concerned.</p>
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<p>One thing to remember is that local newspapers need you as much as you need them. They may not know it, but a great working relationship could be forged with a little work.</p>
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<p>Some businesses can be scared of local newspapers, but don’t be, as they are a useful tool that can be a big help.</p>
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<p>Move forward and make the most of the media, create working friendship and work together for the good of you both.</p>
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<p>If you would like to engage with local, national or even international media, <a href=http://www.myfacemybody.com>www.myfacemybody.com</a> has the skills to turn your PR dreams into reality. <br /> </p>
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<p>Stephen Handisides is co-hosting The Smile Awards. The prestigious ceremony, offering a drinks reception, splendid three-course meal and the exciting ceremony, takes place on the evening of Friday 25 March at the stunning Royal Garden Hotel in central London.</p>
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<p>The shortlist is:</p>
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<p><strong>Orthodontic Smile – fixed appliances</strong><br />Dr Nilu Abizadeh<br />Dr Michael Cheung<br />Dr Istvan Somoskovi<br />Dr John Scholey<br />Dr Megan Hatfield</p>
<p><strong>Orthodontic Smile – removable appliances</strong><br />Dr Yad Zanganah<br />Dr Megan Hatfield<br />Dr Daz Singh<br />Dr Mike Mew<br />Dr Chetan Kaher<br /><strong><br />Restorative Smile</strong><br />Dr Claire Redley<br />Dr Anoop Maini<br />Dr Michael Heffernan<br />Dr Ian Ollerhead<br />Mr Simon Caxton<br />Dr Ken Harris<br />Dr Sunita Verma<br />Dr Arun Darbar<br /><strong><br />Conservative Ceramic Smile</strong><br />Dr Perdo Goncalves<br />Dr Donald Sloss<br />Dr Nadjafi<br />Dr Daz Singh<br />Dr Ken Harris<br />Dr Richard Lee<br />Dr Shameek Popat</p>
<p><strong>Conservative Composite Smile</strong><br />Dr William Shaw<br />Dr Perdo Goncalves<br />Dr Trevor McKissick<br />Dr Nadjafi<br />Dr Ken Harris<br />Dr Richard Lee<br />Dr Mike Lloyd Hughes</p>
<p><strong>Interdisciplinary Smile</strong><br />Dr Michael Cheung<br />Dr Ken Harris<br />Dr Shameek Popat<br />Dr Donald Sloss<br />Dr Chetan Kaher</p>
<p><strong>Single Implant Smile</strong><br />Dr Yad Zanganah<br />Dr Michael Heffernan<br />Dr Ken Harris<br />Dr Andrew Martin<br />Dr Kamlesh Sachdev</p>
<p><strong>Multiple Implant Smile</strong><br />Dr Michael Heffernan<br />Dr Patrick Holmes<br />Dr Yad Zanganah</p>
<p><strong>Non Surgical Facial Aesthetic Smile</strong><br />Dr Ian Hallam<br />Dr Yad Zanganah<br />Dr Sarah Cuffin</p>
<p><strong>Aesthetic Technician</strong><br />Dr Simon Caxton<br />Mr Richard Gidden<br />Mr Phaedra Kazali</p>
<p><strong>Aesthetic Practice 2011</strong><br />Maple Orthodontics<br />Ollie and Darsh</p>
<p><strong>Generosity of a Smile</strong><br />Dr Alastair Hayes<br />Dr Ken Harris<br />Dr Andrea Ubhi<br />Dr James Kleiber</p>
<p><strong>Patient’s Smile</strong><br />Dr Michael Cheung<br />Dr Ken Harris<br />Dr Eli Joffe<br />Dr Mike Heads<br />Dr Jayme Adams<br />Dr Shameek Popat<br />Dr Arun Darbar</p>
<p>To find out who has won by attending this glamorous ceremony, book your places today by calling Karen Sherwood on 01923 851743.</p>
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<p>Alternatively, contact Karen by email at karen.sherwood@fmc.co.uk.</p>
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<p>Further information about the event is available on the website, which can be found at <a href=http://www.smileawards.co.uk>www.smileawards.co.uk</a>. </p>
<p>^1300320000^3811^News feature: Can I quote you on th…^Hitting the local headlines for all the right reasons and actually making an impact in the minds of reporters, let alone readers, can be a v…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/StephenHandisides.jpg<br />
First impressions count^
<p>Fresh from exhibiting at the Dentistry Show and I’m thinking about visibility.</p>
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<p>Am happy to report wonderful feedback from visitors to my stand who said it looked like a mini art exhibition.</p>
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<p>I am flattered and proud: it displays my values and my roots in graphic design. So, how does your practice look to patients or anyone who passes by? Are they impressed by ­what they see?</p>
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<p>Prospective new patients have few ways to measure the quality of dentistry and will make judgments by other means.</p>
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<p>Displaying a shabby or dated exterior is a bit like wearing your tattiest old clothes to an important function – you’d be letting yourself down, people would probably avoid you and the whole thing would be a bit of an embarrassment. It’s all too easy to trundle along from day to day, tolerating the status quo without looking at things afresh.</p>
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<p>Try viewing your practice with a keen, critical and independent eye and take note of your observations. What is your first impression? Does it look like a high quality practice, or is it in desperate need of a makeover and an eye-catching sign?</p>
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<p>Does it appear to be the best in the area? Would you choose this practice?  With all the clinical skills in the world, a shabby practice will let you down.</p>
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<p>Exterior signage not only identifies the practice, but also reflects the quality of care provided.</p>
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<p>Whether the look is vibrant and eye-catching or calm and sensitive, it is a display that says, ‘this is who we are, this shows the quality of what we offer’.</p>
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<p>Here is your chance to look stunning, to make your practice look irresistibly attractive and to draw new patients in. Are you making the most of this opportunity?</p>
<p>^1300320000^3810^First impressions count^Fresh from exhibiting at the Dentistry Show and I’m thinking about visibility.Am happy to report wonderful feedback from visitors to m…^<br />
S4S sponsors occlusion seminars^
<p>Many of your patients could benefit enormously from wearing a splint, the splint therapy and occlusion seminars, sponsored by S4S, can teach you when, how and why to fit them.<br /> <br />Presented by Dr Helen Harrison (BDS MFGDP), these special one-day seminars cover diagnosing occlusal issues and treatment planning, TMJ function and anatomy, principles of progressive splint therapy, relief of pain and stabilisation, the ‘hands-on’ element includes taking occlusal records, using facebows and the uses, designs and fitting of splints.</p>
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<p>The courses are so far responsible for helping more than 700 GDPs to increase their subject knowledge, while earning verifiable CPD hours.<br /> <br />The next dates for the courses are:<br /> <br />Introduction to occlusional splints for the GDP:<br />• 6 May                                     Birmingham            (£280)<br />• 9 September                        London                        (£280)<br />• 4 November                        Sheffield                        (£280)<br /> <br />Hands on splint therapy (limited to 15 delegates)<br />• 2 December                        Birmingham            (£450)<br /> <br />Book now and get both courses for £550 or book before the 31 May (for the introduction course), or the 30 June (for the ‘hands on’ course) to receive an early booking discount of up to £45 per course!<br /> <br />For more information, call 0114 250 0176 or visit <a href=http://www.s4sdental.com>www.s4sdental.com</a>.</p>
<p>^1300320000^3812^S4S sponsors occlusion seminars^Many of your patients could benefit enormously from wearing a splint, the splint therapy and occlusion seminars, sponsored by S4S, can teach…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/NEW-LOGO-S4S.jpg<br />
‘Tooth’ hearing aid gets European thumbs up^
<p>A novel hearing aid that transmit sound via the teeth has been approved for use in Europe.</p>
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<p>The non-surgical and removable hearing solution transmits sound via the teeth to help people with single sided deafness.</p>
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<p>The Soundbite hearing system is a ‘nearly invisible’ digital audio device and relies on a principle called bone conduction that can deliver clear, high quality sound.</p>
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<p>It consists of a small microphone unit worn behind the ear and an easy-to-insert-and-remove dental retainer-like device which requires no modification to the teeth.</p>
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<p>The hearing system was developed by US company Sonitus Medical Inc who expect it to become a more aesthetically pleasing alternative to the usual hearing aid.</p>
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<p>To learn more about Sonitus Medical and the SoundBite hearing system, visit  <a href=http://www.sonitusmedical.com>www.sonitusmedical.com</a>.</p>
<p>^1300320000^3813^’Tooth’ hearing aid gets European t…^A novel hearing aid that transmit sound via the teeth has been approved for use in Europe.The non-surgical and removable hearing solution tr…^http://dev.dentistry.co.uk/sites/all/themes/dentistry/images/news_images/SoundBite.png<br />
Oral disease – rapid among HIV sufferers^
<p>US researchers investigating what affects oral disease among HIV sufferers have pinpointed changes in mouth bacteria.<br /> <br />Although it is known that oral disease progresses rapidly among people who have HIV but the process is poorly understood.</p>
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<p>Through a one-year grant of almost $330,000 from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at the University of Florida are trying to find out the role of various pathogens in the progression of oral disease among people infected with HIV.</p>
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<p>Gary Wang, an assistant professor of infectious diseases in  the UF College of Medicine, and principal investigator of the study, saud: ‘The hypothesis is that suppression of the immune system by HIV contributes to changes in the oral biota, which then contributes to oral disease.’</p>
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<p>‘The whole idea is to be able to understand the microbial signature early – before patients develop disease. That could lead to development of novel molecular tools and biomarkers to screen for disease. </p>
<p>Estimates vary widely, but up to two-thirds of people who have HIV also have periodontitis, according to a literature review in the journal <em>Periodontology 2000</em>. </p>
<p>For patients whose immune system is compromised, periodontitis further contributes to poor health by hindering proper nutrition. It also affects the ability to derive pleasure from eating. </p>
<p>About 500 to 700 different species of oral microorganisms have been identified, and one person can have up to 100 different species in the mouth.</p>
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<p>In most cases those bacteria do no harm, and may in fact provide benefit by crowding out disease-causing bacteria. Communities of bacteria thrive in a thin film on the teeth, with different types of organisms clustering together into neighborhoods based on mutual benefit. </p>
<p>When the immune response is compromised, as in HIV-infected patients, a shift in the composition of micro-organism communities can allow opportunistic pathogens to grow freely. </p>
<p>The UF team will examine those changes through a pilot study of HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals who have chronic periodontitis. </p>
<p>The work is being carried out in collaboration with the Periodontal Disease Research Center, whose director is study co-investigator Nils Ingvar Magnusson, a professor of oral biology in the College of Dentistry. </p>
<p>The researchers will use sophisticated DNA sequencing techniques and bioinformatics to classify bacteria and identify differences between those in the two groups of patients.</p>
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<p>They also plan to track how bacterial composition in the mouth changes as people’s immune status changes. </p>
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<p>Source: </strong><br />University of Florida Health Science Center</p>
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