More men dying in UK as a result of alcohol

More people in the UK died from alcohol-related deaths in 2010 than in 2009 with the figure rising by 126 to 8,790 from 8,664.

However, this increase was limited to males with the number of deaths rising from 5,690 in 2009 to 5,865 in 2010.

The number of female alcohol-related deaths fell over the same period.

Within England and Wales, alcohol-related death rates were highest in the North of England and Wales in 2010.

During the last decade rates were highest for those aged 55-74 and lowest for those aged under 35, according to an Office for National Statistics

(ONS) release Alcohol-related deaths in the United Kingdom, 2010.

In 2010:

·  Males accounted for 67 per cent of all alcohol-related deaths in the UK

·  Male alcohol-related death rates in the North East were 22.6 per 100,000 population, 21.3 per 100,000 in the North West and 18.9 per 100,000 in Wales.

·  Alcohol-related death rates were lowest in the East of England, 11.7 per 100,00 population for males and 5.5 per 100,000 for females

Excessive consumption of alcohol is a major preventable cause of premature mortality with alcohol-related deaths accounting for almost 1.5% of all deaths in England and Wales in 2010.

In 2008, the Department of Health estimated that alcohol harm cost the National Health Service £2.7 billion each year at 2006/07 prices.

There is widespread interest in the ONS release of these statistics since it allows health administrations to monitor alcohol-related deaths and develop policies to protect the health of the public.

Charitable organisations, such as Drinkaware, Alcohol in Moderation and Addaction use the statistics to educate people about the risks associated with alcohol consumption and to target support services to vulnerable groups and to inform public opinion and policy.

The causes of death defined as alcohol-related are listed in full in the bulletin  and include alcohol dependence, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis.

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