Mind the gap

Have you ever worried about something so much that it completely overwhelmed you? 

You may think about it in the day (daydreaming), or worry about it at night (nightmares).

The mind is a vehicle which shows us what we haven’t loved in this world and anything which keeps on occupying time and space in your thoughts, you have yet to equilibrate and love. Your mind, in essence, is the gap!

This may sound a bit far-fetched, so let me explain. It is well known that in physics, tiny particles of light energy called photons, can be divided up into positively charged positrons and negatively charged electrons. 

Your authentic and true nature is light. When you are in a state of love and gratitude, you are not emotional, not run by the mind and are in equilibrium. 

In essence, you are whole and complete. When you become emotional, you are similar to the splitting of light into these two states. One positive (elation) and one negative (depression). When you are in either state, above equilibrium or below equilibrium, then you have less ability and power to manifest what you want in this world and are subject to external circumstances. Have you ever been in either of these two generalised states, either elated or depressed about something?

You will find that you are not being efficient or effective. Your authentic self, or some external circumstance will then want to try and equilibrate you. When you are elated, you can waste time or money, and when you are down, you may tend to withdraw and isolate yourself.

‘When you become emotional about something, you are similar to the splitting of light into two states.’
 

I recently consulted with a principal dentist who was having difficulty in coming to terms with the downturn of his practice financially. They were not earning as much as they were a few years ago and this was upsetting to the dentist. Instead of focusing on high priority action steps to bring a new level of order in the practice to make it grow again, the dentist was getting distracted by low priority things which were taking focus off the business.  He was constantly worrying about what to do in the day and having nightmares about the practice at night.  Patients were sensing his desperation and instead of uptaking his treatment as they would have done in the past, he was literally scaring them off!  This of course made his financial situation worse.  He started to resent the practice and blamed everything outside of him for the way he was reacting.  He wasn’t prepared to look inside of himself for the answers to the emotional volatility he was experiencing and the financial volatility the practice was experiencing.

‘Instead of focusing on high priority action steps to bring a new level of order in the practice to make it grow again, the dentist was getting distracted by low priority things which were taking focus off the business.’

After consulting with him, he began to see the hidden blessings of his situation.  I was able to show him that this feedback the practice was giving him was there to test him and press his emotional buttons, which were in fact being pressed.  It was there to show him the lesson which he had not learnt yet about managing his finances and managing his emotions.  We chipped away one by one and confronted all the emotions he had about his practice which were distracting to him.  The future fears of what may happen to the practice and him, and the past remembered guilts i.e. the things which he was regretting.
 

‘After consulting with him, he began to see the hidden blessings of his situation.’
 

We planned a strategy to get him focused and back on track with choices that were in line with growing the practice.  We looked at his savings and arranged for a regular monthly portion of his income to be set aside and not touched.   He began to build a financial cushion for himself.  He began to focus and get clear on what he wanted to happen, and not what he thought may happen.  Rather than being distracted by his mind, which became the gap between him and the practice, he brought his heart back into the practice.  His mind became present and poised.  He calmed down and accepted his situation and was determined to do something about it.  Slowly and surely his practice started to grow again as he became re-inspired.  This gave him further inspiration to carry on with a newly found momentum.

‘Rather than being distracted by his mind, which became the gap between him and the practice, he brought his heart back into the practice.’
 

As one of the world’s richest men Warren Buffet quotes: 'Until you can manage your emotions, don’t expect to be able to manage money.'

In practice, if you are going through a similar financial crisis, then it is wise to look at the situation without being run by your mind or your emotions. In the Dental Mastery Experience, I show you how to deal with situations in your own practice like this one, and how to re-ignite the heart of your practice from a state of purpose.

This article is copyrighted

Dr Nav Ropra is an international public speaker, human behavioural educator and dentist.  He is dedicated to inspiring individuals, dentists, dental practices and organisations. For more information, visit www.drropra.com.

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