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Dentists would not recommend dentistry

A survey has shown that dentists believe the increased cost of training and fall in financial incentives will deter graduates joining the profession.

Around three quarters of dentists (74%) think that the increasing cost of training and education, combined with the falling financial incentives, will deter future generations from joining the profession, according to a new study by Wesleyan, specialist financial services provider for dentists.

Almost a third of dentists (31%) say they would not recommend the profession to someone at the start of their career, and two in five (40%) wouldn't choose the same career again if they had the chance, the survey found.

Samantha Porter, Wesleyan's group sales and marketing director, said: 'We talk with dentists every day and keep on top of the issues affecting them.

'They are experiencing a great deal of change on a number of issues.'

When asked what dentists were most concerned about over the next five years, financial issues were top of the list with 64% of dentists saying they were worried about rising costs and reduced profits.

This was closely followed by the new dental contract for England and Wales (63%) and changes to the NHS pension scheme (55%).

Also of concern were NHS reforms (45%), and the growth of corporate dentistry (37%).

And while they are worried about pensions now, more than three quarters (76%) of dentists only expect their arrangements to get worse in the future.

Wesleyan announced the research findings as it revealed its refreshed brand, designed to take the 173-year-old company into the next stage of its history.

While there will be no change to the nature of its service, it will no longer use the Wesleyan Medical Sickness brand name.

Samantha Porter finished by saying: 'At Wesleyan, we have a long history of performing strongly whilst anticipating and adapting to change, and just as our new branding shows that we recognise the need to move with the times, our customers must to do the same or risk losing out financially in the future.'

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