oral healthMore than half (58%) of Brits feel having bad teeth would negatively affect their confidence at work.

Women were more self-conscious, with 67% saying poor oral health would affect their confidence, compared to 49% of men.

Generation Z are the age group most conscious of their teeth, with 69% admitting it would affect their confidence.

‘Dental cover is the most popular voluntary health benefit offered,’ Andrew Bower, managing director at Unum Dental, who carried out the research, says.

‘This research emphasises just how important dental insurance can be for an employee’s confidence and their workplace performance.’

Dental insurance scheme

Despite the importance Brits associate with their oral health, the study found check-up costs put many off visiting their dentist.

However, 30% of workers said they would pay for dental insurance if an employee scheme was in place.

And 38% believe they would be more likely to go for a check-up if they had cover.

‘By providing dental insurance, employers offer peace of mind to their employees when it comes to dental and oral health,’ Mr Bower continued.

‘This allows them to instead focus on feeling confident in social situations and getting the most out of life.’

Brushing habits

More than a quarter (27%) of British adults admit they don’t brush their teeth twice a day.

And a third of British adults (33%) say they never floss, according to the latest Consumer Oral Health Survey.

Women are more likely to brush at least twice a day (77%), compared to 69% of men.

‘A proper brushing and flossing routine is an essential part of good oral health,’ Dr Catherine Rutland, dental spokesperson for Simplyhealth Professionals, said.

‘It helps to prevent tooth decay and gum disease.

‘Cleaning between your teeth daily is essential to remove plaque and particles of food that brushing can’t reach.’


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