sugar
Stronger action is needed on sugar the FGDP(UK) has said, after huge quantities were found in some carbonated drinks

Stronger action is needed to reduce the consumption of sugar from fizzy drinks, the FGDP(UK) has announced.

This comes after a newly-published study found that the average 330ml can of sugar-sweetened carbonated drink contains more than the adult’s recommended daily allowance of sugar, 30g (7.5 teaspoons).

Some of the drinks in the study were found to contain over 52g of sugar, 12 teaspoons.

‘The recent news that some manufacturers and supermarkets are reformulating their soft drinks ranges is welcome, and shows that the sugar tax is working even before its implementation,’ dean of the FGDP(UK), Dr Mick Horton, said.

‘However the fact that the average fizzy drink contains more sugar than an adult should consume in an entire day, and three-quarters of them contain more than a child’s recommended maximum, proves they simply cannot form part of a healthy and balanced diet, and stronger action is needed.

‘Further restrictions on advertising of high sugar drinks, and a ban on price promotions, would help stop tens of thousands of children having to be hospitalised to have their teeth extracted, and if the government makes reformulation to under 5g of sugar per 100ml mandatory, the savings to the NHS will far outstrip the tax foregone, and more importantly the nation’s health will be improved.’