music licenceDentists playing music in their practice must have relevant licences or risk legal proceedings, the MDDUS has said.

The warnings come after Dentistry.co.uk reported on the case of Società Consortile Fonografici v Marco Del Corso, which found that broadcasting music within dental practices in Italy does not entitle the practice pay remuneration.

The Court of Justice of the European Union told Dentistry.co.uk that as this judgement was made in the Court of Justice it would apply to all EU member states.

‘Any business that plays recorded music in public is legally required to have relevant licences – and dental practices are no different,’ MDDUS head of dental division, Aubrey Craig, says.

‘There are two types of licences protecting different copyright owners.

‘Practitioners need to have both of these licences in order to have permission to play recorded music in waiting areas.

‘Regardless of whether the radio, CD, MP3 or other form of music is played, the licences need to be paid to protect the copyright of those who create, produce and publish the music or performances.’

Music licences

Dental practices must pay licence fees towards PPL and PRS for Music in order to play music on their premises.

The cost of these licences can depend on several factors, such as the size of practice and how recorded music is used in the business.

‘The law in the UK clearly provides that the performance and playing in public of works, sound recordings, films or broadcasts, is an act restricted by copyright and exercisable only with the consent of the copyright owner,’ A PRS for Music spokesperson said.

‘Therefore, PRS for Music has the right to license businesses who use PRS members’ musical works in this way.’

For more information on music fees and what is required in your practice please visit www.prsformusic.com and www.ppluk.com.